California Bills: Search Results

Results 1-10 of 20,003 bills

SB 1107 (2015-2016) - An Act to Amend Section 85300 Of, and to Add Section 89519.5 To, the Government Code, Relating to the Political Reform Act of 1974.

Political Reform Act of 1974

Benjamin Allen / The bill passed both chambers and has been presented to the governor (enrolled).

Existing law prohibits a person who has been convicted of a felony involving bribery, embezzlement of public money, extortion or theft of public money, perjury, or conspiracy to commit any of those crimes, from being considered a candidate for, or elected to, a state or local elective office. Existing law, the Political Reform Act of 1974, provides that campaign funds under the control of a… More
Existing law prohibits a person who has been convicted of a felony involving bribery, embezzlement of public money, extortion or theft of public money, perjury, or conspiracy to commit any of those crimes, from being considered a candidate for, or elected to, a state or local elective office. Existing law, the Political Reform Act of 1974, provides that campaign funds under the control of a former candidate or elected officer are considered surplus campaign funds at a prescribed time, and it prohibits the use of surplus campaign funds except for specified purposes. This bill would prohibit an officeholder who is convicted of one of those enumerated felonies from using funds held by that officeholder’s candidate controlled committee for purposes other than certain purposes permitted for the use of surplus campaign funds. The bill would also require the officeholder to forfeit any remaining funds held 6 months after the conviction became final, and it would direct those funds to be deposited in the General Fund. The Political Reform Act of 1974 prohibits a public officer from expending, and a candidate from accepting, public moneys for the purpose of seeking elective office. This bill would permit a public officer or candidate to expend or accept public moneys for the purpose of seeking elective office if the state or a local governmental entity established a dedicated fund for this purpose, as specified. A violation of the act’s provisions is punishable as a misdemeanor. By expanding the scope of an existing crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. The Political Reform Act of 1974, an initiative measure, provides that the Legislature may amend the act to further the act’s purposes upon a 23 vote of each house and compliance with specified procedural requirements. This bill would declare that it furthers the purposes of the act. Hide

67 times as much $
Support
Oppose

SB 654 (2015-2016) - An Act to Add Section 12945.6 to the Government Code, Relating to Employment.

Unlawful employment practice: parental leave

Hannah-Beth Jackson / The bill was voted on by the Assembly on August 30, 2016.

Existing law prohibits an employer from refusing to allow a female employee disabled by pregnancy, childbirth, or a related medical condition to take a leave for a reasonable time of up to 4 months before returning to work. Existing law also prohibits an employer from refusing to maintain and pay for coverage under a group health plan for an employee who takes that leave, as specified. This bill… More
Existing law prohibits an employer from refusing to allow a female employee disabled by pregnancy, childbirth, or a related medical condition to take a leave for a reasonable time of up to 4 months before returning to work. Existing law also prohibits an employer from refusing to maintain and pay for coverage under a group health plan for an employee who takes that leave, as specified. This bill would prohibit an employer, as defined, from refusing, as specified, to allow an employee with more than 12 months of service with the employer, and who has at least 1,250 hours of service with the employer during the previous 12-month period, to take up to 6 weeks of parental leave to bond with a new child within one year of the child’s birth, adoption, or foster care placement. The bill would also prohibit an employer from refusing to maintain and pay for coverage under a group health plan for an employee who takes this leave.The provisions of the bill would become operative on January 1, 2018. Hide

AB 2251 (2015-2016) - An Act to Add Division 12.5 (Commencing with Section 28100) to the Financial Code, Relating to Student Loan Servicers.

Student loan servicers: licensing and regulation: Student Loan Servicing Act

Mark Stone / The bill was voted on by the Senate on August 29, 2016.

(1)Existing law establishes the Department of Business Oversight as headed by the Commissioner of Business Oversight, who, among other things, generally provides for the licensure and regulation of persons who are engaged in various consumer financial businesses, including, but not limited to, the business of making consumer or commercial loans. This bill would enact the Student Loan Servicing… More
(1)Existing law establishes the Department of Business Oversight as headed by the Commissioner of Business Oversight, who, among other things, generally provides for the licensure and regulation of persons who are engaged in various consumer financial businesses, including, but not limited to, the business of making consumer or commercial loans. This bill would enact the Student Loan Servicing Act providing for the licensure, regulation, and oversight of student loan servicers by the commissioner and would define terms for its purposes. The bill would prohibit a person from engaging in the business of servicing a student loan in this state, directly or indirectly, without a license, unless exempt from the licensing requirement, and would require a licensee to provide specific services to a student loan borrower and comply with reporting, auditing, and other oversight by the commissioner. The bill would require a person applying for a license to, among other things, pay an application fee, sign the application under penalty of perjury, and submit to a criminal background check by the Department of Justice. By expanding the scope of the crime of perjury and increasing who is authorized to receive criminal record information, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The bill would require each licensee to, among other things, file reports with the commissioner under oath, pay to the commissioner its pro rata share of all costs and expenses reasonably incurred in the administration of these provisions, as estimated by the commissioner, and would authorize the commissioner to enforce these provisions by, among other things, promulgating regulations, performing investigations, suspending a license, and enforcing the provisions in an administrative hearing or in court, as specified. The bill would prohibit the public disclosure of specific information provided by a licensee to the commissioner. The bill would make the act operative on July 1, 2018, except for specific authorizations to the commissioner which may be exercised on and after January 1, 2017. The bill would make legislative findings in support of its provisions. (2)The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. (3)Existing constitutional provisions require that a statute that limits the right of access to the meetings of public bodies or the writings of public officials and agencies be adopted with findings demonstrating the interest protected by the limitation and the need for protecting that interest. This bill would make legislative findings to that effect. Hide

AB 2272 (2015-2016) - An Act to Add Section 144.9 to the Labor Code, Relating to Occupational Safety and Health.

Occupational safety and health standards: plume

Tony Thurmond / The bill was voted on by the Assembly on August 30, 2016.

Under existing law, the Occupational Safety and Health Standards Board within the Department of Industrial Relations promulgates and enforces occupational safety and health standards for the state, including standards dealing with toxic materials and harmful physical agents. Under existing law, the Division of Occupational Safety and Health is required to enforce all occupational safety and… More
Under existing law, the Occupational Safety and Health Standards Board within the Department of Industrial Relations promulgates and enforces occupational safety and health standards for the state, including standards dealing with toxic materials and harmful physical agents. Under existing law, the Division of Occupational Safety and Health is required to enforce all occupational safety and health standards, as specified. A violation of these standards and regulations under specific circumstances is a crime. This bill would, by June 1, 2017, require the division to convene an advisory committee to develop a regulation that requires a health facility to evacuate or remove plume through the use of a plume scavenging system in all settings that employ techniques that involve the creation of plume and would authorize certain entities and people to be on the advisory committee, including, among others, practicing physicians and surgeons from affected specialties. The bill would require the division, in developing the regulation to do certain things, including evaluating the use of certain standards adopted by specified organizations as a benchmark. The bill would also require the division, when developing the proposed regulation, to take into consideration recommendations on the evacuation of plume from the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration or National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. The bill would, by June 1, 2018, require the division to submit to the board the proposed regulation. The bill would, by July 1, 2019, require the board to adopt the proposed regulation.The bill would provide that compliance with general room ventilation standards or the use of surgical masks does not satisfy the requirements for protection from surgical plumes under these provisions. The bill would provide that the use of respirators does not satisfy the requirements for protection from surgical plumes under these provisions, except as specified. The bill would require the manufacturer of a plume scavenging system to provide evidence that the system meets specified minimum requirements when installed, operated, and maintained in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. The bill would specify that these provisions do not limit the authority of the division to develop, or limit the authority of the board to adopt, a regulation with a broader scope or broader application than required by these provisions.By expanding the definition of an existing crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide

$0
Support
Oppose

AB 1826 (2015-2016) - An Act to Amend Sections 46000, 46001, 46002, 46003, 46004.1, 46007, 46010.5, 46012, 46013.1, 46013.2, 46014.1, 46014.2, 46014.4, 46014.6, 46016.4, 46016.5, 46021, and 46028 Of, and to Add Section 46003.2 To, the Food and Agricultural Code, Relating to Organic Products.

Organic products

Mark Stone / The bill passed both chambers and has been presented to the governor (enrolled).

Existing law, the California Organic Products Act of 2003 (the act), requires the Secretary of Food and Agriculture, county agricultural commissioners, and the Director of the State Department of Public Health to enforce state and federal laws governing the production, labeling, and marketing of organic products, as specified. Existing federal law establishes the National Organic Program which… More
Existing law, the California Organic Products Act of 2003 (the act), requires the Secretary of Food and Agriculture, county agricultural commissioners, and the Director of the State Department of Public Health to enforce state and federal laws governing the production, labeling, and marketing of organic products, as specified. Existing federal law establishes the National Organic Program which requires operations that produce or handle organic agricultural products to comply with federal organic standards and be certified by a certifying agent, as specified. This bill would revise and recast the California Organic Products Act of 2003 as the California Organic Food and Farming Act and would set forth the purposes of the act. Existing law establishes the California Organic Products Advisory Committee, comprised of 15 members, to advise the secretary on his or her responsibilities under the act. This bill would revise the composition of the advisory committee and would expand the scope of the advisory committee’s duties to include advising the secretary on education, outreach, and technical assistance for producers. The bill would authorize the secretary, in consultation with the advisory committee, to establish procedures for and conduct certain activities, including supporting organic agriculture through education, outreach, and other programmatic activities. The bill would specify that penalties collected by the secretary and fees collected by county agricultural commissioners pursuant to the act’s provisions shall be expended to fulfill the responsibilities authorized under the act, and would exempt from the Administrative Procedure Act the adoption, amendment, or repeal of a registration fee. Existing law requires every person engaged in the state in the production or handling of raw agricultural products sold as organic to register with the county agricultural commissioner and specifies the information required on the registration form. Existing law requires a certification organization that certifies product in the state as organic to register with the secretary and to pay an annual registration fee based on the number of clients the organization has certified, up to a maximum of $250. This bill would require those persons to instead register with the secretary, would revise the registration fees required to be paid by certain registrants, and would revise the information required on the registration form. The bill would also revise the type of information and records that persons who produce, handle, or retail products sold as organic are required to keep or make available. The bill would increase the maximum annual registration fee for certification agencies from $250 to $500. The bill would define certain terms for purposes of the act’s provisions and would make technical and conforming changes to various code sections. To the extent the bill would impose additional duties on county agricultural commissioners, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to these statutory provisions. Hide

AB 1561 (2015-2016) - An Act to Add and Repeal Section 6363.10 of the Revenue and Taxation Code, Relating to Taxation, to Take Effect Immediately, Tax Levy.

Sales and use taxes: exemption: sanitary napkins: tampons: menstrual sponges and menstrual cups

Cristina Garcia, Ling Ling Chang / The bill passed both chambers and has been presented to the governor (enrolled).

Existing sales and use tax laws impose a tax on retailers measured by the gross receipts from the sale of tangible personal property sold at retail in this state, or on the storage, use, or other consumption in this state of tangible personal property purchased from a retailer for storage, use, or other consumption in this state. Those laws provide various exemptions from those taxes. This bill,… More
Existing sales and use tax laws impose a tax on retailers measured by the gross receipts from the sale of tangible personal property sold at retail in this state, or on the storage, use, or other consumption in this state of tangible personal property purchased from a retailer for storage, use, or other consumption in this state. Those laws provide various exemptions from those taxes. This bill, on and after January 1, 2017, and before January 1, 2022, would exempt from those taxes the gross receipts from the sale in this state of, and the storage, use, or other consumption in this state of, tampons, sanitary napkins, menstrual sponges, and menstrual cups. The Bradley-Burns Uniform Local Sales and Use Tax Law authorizes counties and cities to impose local sales and use taxes in conformity with the Sales and Use Tax Law, and existing law authorizes districts, as specified, to impose transactions and use taxes in accordance with the Transactions and Use Tax Law, which conforms to the Sales and Use Tax Law. Amendments to state sales and use taxes are incorporated into these laws. Section 2230 of the Revenue and Taxation Code provides that the state will reimburse counties and cities for revenue losses caused by the enactment of sales and use tax exemptions. This bill would provide that, notwithstanding Section 2230 of the Revenue and Taxation Code, no appropriation is made and the state shall not reimburse any local agencies for sales and use tax revenues lost by them pursuant to this bill. This bill would take effect immediately as a tax levy. Hide

SB 1129 (2015-2016) - An Act to Amend Section 647 of the Penal Code, Relating to Crimes.

Prostitution: sanctions

Bill Monning / The bill passed both chambers and has been presented to the governor (enrolled).

Existing law provides that a person who solicits or agrees to engage in or engages in lewd or dissolute conduct in public, as specified, or an act of prostitution is guilty of disorderly conduct, a misdemeanor. If a defendant is convicted a 2nd time of an act of prostitution, as specified, existing law requires the defendant to be imprisoned in a county jail for a period of not less than 45 days,… More
Existing law provides that a person who solicits or agrees to engage in or engages in lewd or dissolute conduct in public, as specified, or an act of prostitution is guilty of disorderly conduct, a misdemeanor. If a defendant is convicted a 2nd time of an act of prostitution, as specified, existing law requires the defendant to be imprisoned in a county jail for a period of not less than 45 days, as specified, and if the defendant is convicted 3 or more times, that minimum period of imprisonment is not less than 90 days, as specified. This bill would delete those mandatory minimum terms of incarceration imposed for engaging in prohibited acts relating to prostitution. This bill would incorporate additional changes to Section 647 of the Penal Code, proposed by SB 420, SB 1322, and AB 1708, that would become operative only if this bill and one or more of those other bills are enacted and become effective January 1, 2017, and this bill is chaptered last. Hide

$0
Support
Oppose

SB 1322 (2015-2016) - An Act to Amend Sections 647 and 653.22 of the Penal Code, Relating to Minors.

Commercial sex acts: minors

Holly Mitchell / The bill passed both chambers and has been presented to the governor (enrolled).

Existing law makes it a crime to solicit or engage in any act of prostitution. Existing law makes it a crime to loiter in any public place with the intent to commit prostitution. This bill would make the above provisions inapplicable to a child under 18 years of age who is alleged to have engaged in conduct that would, if committed by an adult, violate the above provisions. The bill would… More
Existing law makes it a crime to solicit or engage in any act of prostitution. Existing law makes it a crime to loiter in any public place with the intent to commit prostitution. This bill would make the above provisions inapplicable to a child under 18 years of age who is alleged to have engaged in conduct that would, if committed by an adult, violate the above provisions. The bill would authorize the minor to be taken into temporary custody under limited circumstances. This bill would incorporate additional changes to Section 647 of the Penal Code, proposed by SB 420, SB 1129, and AB 1708, that would become operative only if this bill and one or more of those other bills are enacted and become effective on or before January 1, 2017, and this bill is chaptered last. This bill would incorporate additional changes to Section 653.22 of the Penal Code, proposed by AB 1771, that would become operative only if this bill and AB 1771 are enacted and become effective on or before January 1, 2017, and this bill is chaptered last. Hide

68 times as much $
Support
Oppose

SB 1425 (2015-2016) - An Act to Add Part 6 (Commencing with Section 71420) to Division 34 of the Public Resources Code, Relating to Greenhouse Gases.

Water-energy nexus registry

Fran Pavley / The bill was voted on by the Senate on August 29, 2016.

The California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 designates the State Air Resources Board as the state agency charged with monitoring and regulating sources of emissions of greenhouse gases. Existing law creates the California Environmental Protection Agency, consisting of various boards, offices, and departments, including the state board. Existing law, until 2008, established the former… More
The California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 designates the State Air Resources Board as the state agency charged with monitoring and regulating sources of emissions of greenhouse gases. Existing law creates the California Environmental Protection Agency, consisting of various boards, offices, and departments, including the state board. Existing law, until 2008, established the former California Climate Action Registry to carry out specified actions, including, among others, helping various entities in the state to establish emissions baselines, encourage voluntary actions to increase energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and recognize, publicize, and promote participants in the registry. This bill would require the agency to oversee the development of a registry for greenhouse gas emissions resulting from the water-energy nexus using the best available data. The bill would authorize the agency to enter into a contract with a qualified nonprofit organization to develop and administer the registry, which would include, among other things, the above-stated actions of the former California Climate Action Registry as those relate to the water-energy nexus. Hide

$0
Support
Oppose

SB 450 (2015-2016) - An Act to Amend Sections 3017 and 15320 Of, to Add Sections 4005, 4006, and 4007 To, and to Add and Repeal Section 4008 Of, the Elections Code, Relating to Elections.

Elections: vote by mail voting and mail ballot elections

Benjamin Allen, Robert M. Hertzberg / The bill was voted on by the Senate on August 29, 2016.

Existing law requires all vote by mail ballots to be voted on or before the day of the election and requires the vote by mail voter to return the ballot by mail or in person, as specified, to the elections official who issued the ballot. This bill would require an elections official who receives a vote by mail ballot that he or she did not issue to forward that ballot to the elections official… More
Existing law requires all vote by mail ballots to be voted on or before the day of the election and requires the vote by mail voter to return the ballot by mail or in person, as specified, to the elections official who issued the ballot. This bill would require an elections official who receives a vote by mail ballot that he or she did not issue to forward that ballot to the elections official who issued the ballot no later than 8 days after receipt. By requiring an elections official to forward a ballot to the elections official who issued the ballot, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. Existing law authorizes cities with a population of fewer than 100,000 persons, school districts, and special districts to conduct an all-mailed ballot special election to fill a vacancy on the legislative or governing body of those entities under specified conditions. This bill, the California Voter’s Choice Act, would, on or after January 1, 2018, authorize specified counties, and on or after January 1, 2020, authorize any county except the County of Los Angeles, to conduct any election as an all-mailed ballot election if certain conditions are satisfied, including conditions related to ballot dropoff locations, vote centers, and plans for the administration of all-mailed ballot elections. The bill would require the Secretary of State, within 6 months of each all-mailed ballot election conducted by a county pursuant to these provisions, to report certain information to the Legislature regarding that election. The bill would require the county that conducted the all-mailed ballot election to submit to the Secretary of State the information needed for the Secretary of State to prepare the report. This bill would, on or after January 1, 2020, authorize the County of Los Angeles to conduct any election as a vote center election if certain conditions are satisfied, including conditions related to ballot dropoff locations and vote centers. The bill would, on or after January 1, 2020, authorize the County of Los Angeles to conduct a special election as an all-mailed ballot election pursuant to specified provisions that apply to every county that chooses to conduct a special election as an all-mailed ballot election. This bill would also require the Secretary of State to establish a taskforce that includes certain individuals to review all-mailed ballot elections conducted pursuant to these provisions and to provide comments and recommendations to the Legislature within 6 months of each all-mailed ballot election or vote center election. This bill would incorporate additional changes to Section 3017 of the Elections Code proposed by AB 1921 that would become operative only if AB 1921 and this bill are both chaptered and this bill is chaptered last. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to these statutory provisions. Hide

88 times as much $
Support
Oppose