California Bills: Search Results

Results 1-10 of 1,813 bills

AB 105 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend Sections 164.56 and 2106 Of, to Amend the Heading of Chapter 3 (Commencing with Section 2100) of Division 3 Of, to Amend and Repeal Sections 892.2, 892.4, 892.5, 892.6, 893, 893.2, 893.4, 893.6, 894, 894.2, and 2333.5 Of, and to Add Chapter 8 (Commencing with Section 2380) to Division 3 Of, the Streets and Highways Code, Relating to Transportation, and Making an Appropriation Therefor, to Take Effect Immediately, Bill Related to the Budget.

Active Transportation Program

Assembly Committee on Budget / The bill was voted on by a Senate committee on August 29, 2013.

Existing law establishes various transportation programs and associated funds and accounts, including the Bicycle Transportation Account, the Bikeway Account, and the Safe Routes to School Program. Existing federal law, pursuant to the Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act, reconstitutes various federal transportation funding programs, including the former Transportation Enhancements… More
Existing law establishes various transportation programs and associated funds and accounts, including the Bicycle Transportation Account, the Bikeway Account, and the Safe Routes to School Program. Existing federal law, pursuant to the Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act, reconstitutes various federal transportation funding programs, including the former Transportation Enhancements Program, and creates the new federal Transportation Alternatives Program comprised of various former separate programs. This bill would create the Active Transportation Program in the Department of Transportation, to be funded in the annual Budget Act from specified federal and state transportation funds, including 100% of the available federal Transportation Alternatives Program funds and federal Recreational Trails Program funds, except as specified, $21,000,000 of federal Highway Safety Improvement Program funds or other federal funds, a specified amount of fuel tax revenues from the Highway Users Tax Account and the State Highway Account, and from other available funds. The bill would provide for funds to be allocated to eligible projects by the California Transportation Commission, with 40% of available funds to be made available for programming by metropolitan planning organizations in urbanized areas with a population greater than 200,000, 10% for small urban and rural regions, and 50% on a statewide basis, with all awards to be made competitively, as specified. The bill would include among the authorized activities for the Active Transportation Program certain existing activities of the above-referenced programs and accounts. The bill would also add new authorized activities, as specified. The bill would require the commission to develop guidelines and procedures, including project selection criteria, for the program in consultation with various agencies and interested parties. The bill would require the commission to initially adopt a 2-year program of projects for the program, with subsequent 4-year programs thereafter. The bill would correspondingly eliminate the Bicycle Transportation Account, the Bikeway Account, and the Safe Routes to School Program as separate programs. The bill would require the Commission, no later then 45 days prior to adopting the initial set of final guidelines for the Active Transportation Program, to submit the draft guidelines to the Joint Legislative Budget Committee. This bill would provide that no additional funds shall be transferred to the Bicycle Transportation Account. The bill would transfer the remaining assets and liabilities of the Bicycle Transportation Account and the Bikeway Account to the State Highway Account on July 1, 2014, and would provide that various provisions governing these programs become inoperative on July 1, 2014, and would be repealed on January 1, 2015. Existing law creates the Environmental Enhancement and Mitigation Program Fund, and states the intent of the Legislature to allocate $10,000,000 annually to the fund, for expenditure on grants to specified agencies and nonprofit entities for various types of projects that are directly or indirectly related to the environmental impact of transportation facilities, including, among other things, highway landscaping and roadside recreational opportunities. This bill would instead state the intent of the Legislature to allocate $7,000,000 annually to the fund, and would delete the reference to projects for highway landscaping and roadside recreational opportunities. The bill would appropriate $10,000,000 from the Environmental Enhancement and Mitigation Program Fund to the Secretary of the Natural Resources Agency for grants awarded by the secretary to support local environmental enhancement and mitigation programs. This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as a bill providing for appropriations related to the Budget Bill. Hide

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AB 1080 (2013-2014) - An Act to Add Part 1.87 (Commencing with Section 34191.50) to Division 24 of the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Economic Development.

Community Revitalization and Investment Authorities

Luis Alejo / The bill was voted on by a Senate committee on August 26, 2013.

The Community Redevelopment Law authorizes the establishment of redevelopment agencies in communities to address the effects of blight, as defined. Existing law dissolved redevelopment agencies and community development agencies, as of February 1, 2012, and provides for the designation of successor agencies. Existing law provides for various economic development programs that foster community… More
The Community Redevelopment Law authorizes the establishment of redevelopment agencies in communities to address the effects of blight, as defined. Existing law dissolved redevelopment agencies and community development agencies, as of February 1, 2012, and provides for the designation of successor agencies. Existing law provides for various economic development programs that foster community sustainability and community and economic development initiatives throughout the state. This bill would authorize certain public entities of a community revitalization and investment area, as described, to form a community revitalization plan within a community revitalization and investment authority (authority) to carry out the Community Redevelopment Law in a specified manner. The bill would require the authority to adopt a community revitalization plan for a community revitalization and investment area and authorize the authority to include in that plan a provision for the receipt of tax increment funds. Hide

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AB 1102 (2013-2014) - An Act to Add Section 30607.8 to the Public Resources Code, Relating to Coastal Resources.

Beach fire rings: coastal development permit

Travis Allen, Sharon Quirk-Silva / The bill was voted on by a Senate committee on August 11, 2014.

(1)Existing law, the California Coastal Act of 1976, provides for the planning and regulation of a development and requires any person undertaking development in the coastal zone to obtain a coastal development permit issued by the California Coastal Commission in accordance with prescribed procedures. This bill would require a city or county, including a charter city or charter county, to apply… More
(1)Existing law, the California Coastal Act of 1976, provides for the planning and regulation of a development and requires any person undertaking development in the coastal zone to obtain a coastal development permit issued by the California Coastal Commission in accordance with prescribed procedures. This bill would require a city or county, including a charter city or charter county, to apply for a coastal development permit to remove or restrict the use of a beach fire ring, as defined, and would require that application to include specified information. The bill would not affect the applicability of a specified provision relating to ambient air quality standards, emission standards, or air pollution control programs or facilities established by the State Air Resources Board or an air pollution control or air quality management district. The bill would not prohibit the City of Newport Beach from distributing charcoal free of charge for use in a beach fire ring within 700 feet of a residence. By increasing the duties of local officials with respect to the California Coastal Act, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. (2)The bill would declare these provisions to be declaratory of existing law.(3)The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to these statutory provisions. Hide

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AB 1188 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend Section 13928 of the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Fire Protection.

Fire protection: general obligation bonds

Steven Bradford / The bill was voted on by the Assembly on May 16, 2013.

Existing law requires a board of directors of a fire protection district to adopt a resolution making determinations and calling for an election on a proposition to incur indebtedness and to issue general obligation bonds when the board determines that it is necessary to incur indebtedness for the acquisition or construction of any real property or other capital expense or for funding or… More
Existing law requires a board of directors of a fire protection district to adopt a resolution making determinations and calling for an election on a proposition to incur indebtedness and to issue general obligation bonds when the board determines that it is necessary to incur indebtedness for the acquisition or construction of any real property or other capital expense or for funding or refunding of any outstanding indebtedness. Existing law authorizes the board to adopt resolutions to issue bonds for all or any part of the amount of the indebtedness if23 of voters vote in favor of the proposition to incur the indebtedness. This bill would also authorize bonded indebtedness under these provisions upon approval of 55% of the voters to fund activities involving buildings, facilities, and equipment for the direct and exclusive use of fire, emergency response, police, or sheriff personnel. The bill would become operative only if ACA 3 of the 2013–14 Regular Session is approved by the voters. Hide

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AB 1199 (2013-2014) - An Act to Add Section 84750.9 to the Education Code, Relating to Community Colleges, and Declaring the Urgency Thereof, to Take Effect Immediately.

Community colleges: funding

Paul Fong / The bill was voted on by the Assembly on June 14, 2013.

Existing law establishes the California Community Colleges under the administration of the Board of Governors of the California Community Colleges. Existing law authorizes the establishment of community college districts under the administration of community college governing boards, and authorizes these districts to provide instruction at community college campuses throughout the state. Existing… More
Existing law establishes the California Community Colleges under the administration of the Board of Governors of the California Community Colleges. Existing law authorizes the establishment of community college districts under the administration of community college governing boards, and authorizes these districts to provide instruction at community college campuses throughout the state. Existing law requires the board of governors to develop criteria and standards, in accordance with specified statewide minimum requirements, for the purposes of making the annual budget request for the California Community Colleges to the Governor and the Legislature and allocating state general apportionment revenues. Those statewide minimum requirements include, among other things, a requirement that the calculations of each community college district’s revenue level for each fiscal year be based on specified criteria, with revenue adjustments being made for increases or decreases in full-time equivalent students (FTES) for specified purposes. This bill would require the board of governors to adopt a stabilization formula for calculating a community college district’s revenue level for each fiscal year, which would provide for revenue adjustments if certain conditions are met, including that the community college district or a campus of the district is subject to a probation or a “show cause” accreditation sanction, the district has identified a new funding source sufficient for the specified payment of any fund liability, and the district submits an improvement plan to the Chancellor of the California Community Colleges. Under existing law, for credit and noncredit instruction, decreases in FTES are required to result in revenue reductions beginning in the year following the initial year of decrease in FTES, and at the district’s marginal funding per FTES. This bill would require the adopted stabilization formula to provide that, for a qualifying community college district, decreases in FTES are required to result in prescribed adjustments in district revenues beginning in the year following the initial year in which the district qualifies for stabilization funding. This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as an urgency statute. Hide

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AB 1330 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend Sections 12812.2 and 54954.3 of the Government Code and to Add Section 71119 to the Public Resources Code, Relating to Environmental Justice.

Environmental justice

John Perez / The bill was voted on by a Senate committee on August 30, 2013.

(1)Existing law gives the responsibility and authority to a deputy to the Secretary for Environmental Protection to, in consultation with the Attorney General, establish a cross-media enforcement unit to assist a board, department, office, or other agency that implements a law or regulation within the jurisdiction of the California Environmental Protection Agency. Existing law requires the… More
(1)Existing law gives the responsibility and authority to a deputy to the Secretary for Environmental Protection to, in consultation with the Attorney General, establish a cross-media enforcement unit to assist a board, department, office, or other agency that implements a law or regulation within the jurisdiction of the California Environmental Protection Agency. Existing law requires the agency to identify disadvantaged communities for investment opportunities under the California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006. This bill would require the secretary to ensure that the unit give priority to enforcement actions for a violation occurring in those disadvantaged communities.(2)The Ralph M. Brown Act requires a local legislative body to provide an opportunity for members of the public to directly address the body concerning any item described in a notice of meeting. The act authorizes the legislative body to adopt reasonable regulations limiting the total amount of time allocated for public testimony for each individual speaker. This bill would prohibit, if a local legislative body limits the time for public comment, the body from counting the time used by a translator to translate comments from a non-English speaker in determining whether the speaker has exceeded his or her time limit unless simultaneous translation equipment is used to allow the body to hear the translated public testimony simultaneously.This bill would raise the grant cap to $50,000.(3)This bill would require the California Environmental Protection Agency to maintain an agencywide public database of certain information related to entities regulated by each board, department, and office of the agency.(4)The bill would declare that the provisions of the bill are severable.(5)This bill would incorporate additional changes to Section 54954.3 of the Government Code proposed by AB 194 that would become operative if this bill and AB 194 are both chaptered and this bill is chaptered last. Hide

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AB 1331 (2013-2014) - An Act to Repeal and Add Division 26.7 (Commencing with Section 79700) of the Water Code, and to Repeal Section 2 of Chapter 3 of the Seventh Extraordinary Session of the Statutes of 2009, Relating to a Clean, Safe, and Reliable Drinking Water Program, by Providing the Funds Necessary Therefor Through an Election for the Issuance and Sale of Bonds of the State of California and for the Handling and Disposition of Those Funds.

Clean, Safe, and Reliable Drinking Water Act of 2014

Anthony Rendon / The bill was voted on by a Senate committee on May 7, 2014.

(1)Existing law, the Safe, Clean, and Reliable Drinking Water Supply Act of 2012, if approved by the voters, would authorize the issuance of bonds in the amount of $11,140,000,000 pursuant to the State General Obligation Bond Law to finance a safe drinking water and water supply reliability program. Existing law provides for the submission of the bond act to the voters at the November 4, 2014,… More
(1)Existing law, the Safe, Clean, and Reliable Drinking Water Supply Act of 2012, if approved by the voters, would authorize the issuance of bonds in the amount of $11,140,000,000 pursuant to the State General Obligation Bond Law to finance a safe drinking water and water supply reliability program. Existing law provides for the submission of the bond act to the voters at the November 4, 2014, statewide general election. This bill would repeal these provisions. (2)Under existing law, various measures have been approved by the voters to provide funds for water supply and protection facilities and programs. This bill would enact the Clean, Safe, and Reliable Drinking Water Act of 2014, which, if adopted by the voters, would authorize the issuance of bonds in the amount of $8,200,000,000 pursuant to the State General Obligation Bond Law to finance a clean, safe, and reliable drinking water program. This bill would provide for the submission of the bond act to the voters at the November 4, 2014, statewide general election. Hide

AB 1407 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend Sections 871.5 and 873 Of, to Add Sections 875.5 and 1001.7 To, to Repeal Sections 871.7, 879, 879.5, 880, 882, and 883 Of, and to Repeal and Add Sections 872, 874, 875, 876, 877, and 878 Of, the Public Utilities Code, Relating to Public Communications.

Public utilities: voice communications service: lifeline program

Steven Bradford / The bill was voted on by a Senate committee on August 19, 2013.

Existing law, the federal Telecommunications Act of 1996, establishes a program of cooperative federalism for the regulation of telecommunications to attain the goal of local competition, while implementing specific, predictable, and sufficient federal and state mechanisms to preserve and advance universal service, consistent with certain universal service principles. Under the act, universal… More
Existing law, the federal Telecommunications Act of 1996, establishes a program of cooperative federalism for the regulation of telecommunications to attain the goal of local competition, while implementing specific, predictable, and sufficient federal and state mechanisms to preserve and advance universal service, consistent with certain universal service principles. Under the act, universal service is an evolving level of telecommunications services that the Federal Communications Commission is required to establish periodically, taking into account advances in telecommunications and information technologies and services. Pursuant to the act, the Federal Communications Commission has established and revised a lifeline program that is available for qualifying low-income consumers. Under existing law, the Public Utilities Commission has regulatory authority over public utilities, including telephone corporations. The Moore Universal Telephone Service Act establishes the Universal Lifeline Telephone Service program in order to provide low-income households with access to affordable basic residential telephone service. Existing law establishes the Universal Lifeline Telephone Service Trust Administrative Committee Fund in the State Treasury. This bill would recast the Moore Universal Telephone Service Act so that it would provide a household, as defined, having an eligible customer, as defined, with high-quality voice communications service at affordable rates. The bill would state the intent of the Legislature to ensure that California residents have access to technologies and services and to promote technological neutrality by giving lifeline customers the ability to choose the communications provider and service that best meet their unique needs, while encouraging providers to participate in the lifeline program. The Moore Universal Telephone Service Act requires the Public Utilities Commission to annually designate a class of lifeline service necessary to meet minimum residential, as defined, communications needs, to set the rates and charges for that service, to develop eligibility criteria for that service, and to assess the degree of achievement of universal service, including telephone penetration rates by income, ethnicity, and geography. The bill would instead require the Public Utilities Commission to annually develop eligibility criteria for customers to participate in the program, assess the penetration rates for lifeline service by income, ethnicity, and geography, and to prepare and submit a report to the Legislature on the fiscal status of the lifeline program that includes a statement of the lifeline program surcharge level and revenues produced by the surcharge, the size of the Universal Lifeline Telephone Service Trust Administrative Committee Fund, the reason for a decline or increase in the size of the fund, if applicable, an accounting of program expenses, and an evaluation of options for controlling those expenses and increasing program efficiency. The Moore Universal Telephone Service Act requires that the Universal Lifeline Telephone Service rates be set at no more than 50% of either the basic rate for measured residential telephone service or the basic flat residential telephone rate service, as applicable, exclusive of federally mandated end user access charges that are available to the residential subscriber. Existing law requires that the lifeline telephone service installation or connection charge, or both, be not more than 50% of the charge for basic residential service installation or connection. The bill would repeal these requirements and instead require that through and including December 31, 2014, the nonrecurring service charge for commencing voice service for a single voice connection for a lifeline customer be no greater than $10. Until and including December 31, 2014, the lifeline provider would be eligible for reimbursement from the fund for the difference between the nonrecurring charge paid by a lifeline subscriber and the nonrecurring charge the lifeline provider charges for identical services in the ordinary course of business to subscribers that are not eligible customers, subject to the limitation that the reimbursement can be no more than $40 per connection. Beginning January 1, 2015, the Public Utilities Commission would be authorized to annually increase the nonrecurring service charge incurred by eligible customers, and the lifeline provider connection reimbursement, by an amount in proportion to the increase, if any, to the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U). The bill would authorize the commission to authorize a lifeline provider to be reimbursed pursuant to these provisions, for commencing voice service for an eligible customer, only if that provider is the customer’s carrier of last resort for basic service. The bill would require that every eligible customer be given a discount of $11.85 per month, in addition to any federally supported lifeline discount provided to customers of an eligible telecommunications carrier, and would, beginning January 1, 2015, authorize the commission to annually adjust the support amount in proportion to the increase, if any, in the CPI-U. The bill would provide that an eligible customer is not entitled to any combined monthly federal and state lifeline support in excess of the customer’s monthly rate. The bill would require that state lifeline support be provided only after federal lifeline support, if any, is received by an eligible customer.The bill would require that all providers participating in the California lifeline program offer lifeline service at the same rates that were in effect on July 1, 2013, through and including December 31, 2014. The bill would require every lifeline provider, on first contact by a prospective eligible customer, to inform the customer of the availability of the lifeline discount and how that customer may qualify for and obtain the discount. The bill would provide that a lifeline provider that is a prospective eligible customer’s carrier of last resort for basic service remains subject to any customer notification obligations applicable to the provision of basic service. The Public Utilities Act prohibits any telephone corporation from beginning the construction of, among other things, a line, plant, or system, or of any extension thereof, without having first obtained from the commission a certificate that the present or future public convenience and necessity require or will require that construction (certificate of public convenience and necessity). This bill would prohibit the commission from denying or revoking a certificate of public convenience and necessity applied for by or issued to a telephone corporation that provides retail or wholesale telecommunications services on the grounds that the telephone corporation also provides Voice over Internet Protocol service or any other unregulated service.Under existing law, a violation of the Public Utilities Act or any order, decision, rule, direction, demand, or requirement of the commission is a crime. Because the provisions of this bill would be a part of the act and would require action by the Public Utilities Commission to implement its requirements, and because the bill would expand the class of lifeline providers, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program by expanding the scope of a crime. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide

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AB 1437 (2013-2014) - An Act to Add Chapter 4.6 (Commencing with Section 19060) to Part 3 of Division 9 of the Food and Agriculture Code, Relating to Medically Important Antimicrobials.

Medically important antimicrobials: livestock and poultry

Kevin Mullin / The bill has been introduced.

Under existing law, the Department of Food and Agriculture is responsible for enforcing provisions relating to the importation of animals, milk and milk products, produce dealers, and other agricultural regulations. Existing law, the California Meat and Poultry Inspection Act, establishes a meat and poultry inspection program and, in connection with the operation of that program by the… More
Under existing law, the Department of Food and Agriculture is responsible for enforcing provisions relating to the importation of animals, milk and milk products, produce dealers, and other agricultural regulations. Existing law, the California Meat and Poultry Inspection Act, establishes a meat and poultry inspection program and, in connection with the operation of that program by the department, authorizes the Secretary of Food and Agriculture to adopt, by regulation, standards and requirements that meet those prescribed by the Federal Meat Inspection Act and the Federal Poultry Products Inspection Act.This bill would prohibit a livestock or poultry product from being sold in California if the livestock or poultry product is constituted of livestock or poultry that was administered a medically important antimicrobial for nontherapeutic use, such as growth promotion, feed efficiency, weight gain, or disease prevention. The bill would also prohibit a livestock or poultry product sold in California to be constituted of livestock or poultry that was administered a medically important antimicrobial for nonroutine disease control unless certain conditions are met. The bill would prohibit a livestock or poultry product from being sold in California unless the livestock or poultry product is constituted wholly or in part of livestock or poultry that was slaughtered at a registered slaughter facility and the slaughter facility annually reports specified information to the department regarding the use of medically important antimicrobials. The bill would also prohibit a medically important antimicrobial from being administered to a food-producing animal unless the medically important antimicrobial is administered for a therapeutic use and consistently with specified veterinarian provisions. The bill would require the department to establish, by regulation, a schedule for the implementation of these provisions and require that they be fully implemented on or before on January 1, 2020. The bill would require the department to post the information reported by the slaughter facilities on an Internet Web site commencing on or before December 31, 2017. This bill would require the department to adopt any regulations necessary to implement the provisions of the bill. Hide

AB 145 (2013-2014) - An Act to Add Sections 116271, 116272, 116272.5, and 116760.25 to the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Drinking Water.

State Water Resources Control Board: drinking water

Henry Perea, Anthony Rendon / The bill was voted on by a Senate committee on August 12, 2013.

The California Safe Drinking Water Act (state act) provides for the operation of public water systems and imposes on the State Department of Public Health various duties and responsibilities. Existing law requires the department to conduct research, studies, and demonstration projects relating to the provision of a dependable, safe supply of drinking water, to adopt regulations to implement the… More
The California Safe Drinking Water Act (state act) provides for the operation of public water systems and imposes on the State Department of Public Health various duties and responsibilities. Existing law requires the department to conduct research, studies, and demonstration projects relating to the provision of a dependable, safe supply of drinking water, to adopt regulations to implement the state act, and to enforce provisions of the federal Safe Drinking Water Act. This bill would transfer to the State Water Resources Control Board the various duties and responsibilities imposed on the department by the state act. The bill would require these provisions to be implemented during the 2014–15 fiscal year. The Safe Drinking Water State Revolving Fund Law of 1997 establishes the Safe Drinking Water State Revolving Fund to provide grants or revolving fund loans for the design and construction of projects for public water systems that will enable suppliers to meet safe drinking water standards. Under that law, the department is responsible for administering the fund. This bill would also transfer to the state board the authority, duties, powers, purposes, responsibilities, and jurisdiction of the department for the purposes of that law. The bill would require these provisions to be implemented during the 2014–15 fiscal year.This bill would require the California Environmental Protection Agency, in consultation with the California Health and Human Services Agency, to prepare a project initiation document for the transfer of the state drinking water program of this part from the State Department of Public Health to a Division of Drinking Water Quality of the State Water Resources Control Board, to be delivered to specified legislative committees by April 1, 2014, and included in the May Revision of the 2014−15 fiscal year budget. Hide

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