California Bills: Search Results

Results 1-10 of 5,527 bills

SB 1018 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend Sections 405, 5915, and 5918 of the Food and Agricultural Code, Relating to Pest Control.

Pest control: citrus disease prevention

Kevin De Leon / The bill has become law (chaptered).

(1)Existing law authorizes the Department of Food and Agriculture, with the prior approval of the Department of Fish and Wildlife and the State Department of Health Care Services, to reproduce or distribute biological control organisms that are not detrimental to the public health and safety that are known to be useful in reducing or preventing plant or animal damage due to pests or diseases.… More
(1)Existing law authorizes the Department of Food and Agriculture, with the prior approval of the Department of Fish and Wildlife and the State Department of Health Care Services, to reproduce or distribute biological control organisms that are not detrimental to the public health and safety that are known to be useful in reducing or preventing plant or animal damage due to pests or diseases. Existing law prohibits the department from engaging in the production of beneficial organisms when those organisms are available for purchase from commercial sources. This bill would instead prohibit the department from engaging in the production of beneficial organisms when those organisms are available in sufficient amounts for purchase from commercial sources. (2)Existing law creates in the department the California Citrus Pest and Disease Prevention Committee and provides for its continuation, and that of the California Citrus Pest and Disease Prevention Program, every 4 years subject to a referendum of the citrus producers on or before June 30, 2013, and every 4 years thereafter. Pursuant to this referendum the department has extended the citrus pest and disease prevention program for an additional 4 years. Under existing law, the committee is required to develop and make recommendations to the Secretary of Food and Agriculture on all matters regarding the implementation of the citrus pest and disease prevention program. This bill would prohibit the secretary from altering any citrus pest and disease prevention program or activity submitted by the committee to, and approved by, the secretary without first notifying the committee of the alteration. (3)Existing law requires the committee to reimburse the secretary for all expenditures incurred by the secretary in carrying out his or her duties and responsibilities pursuant to the citrus pest and disease prevention program, including the costs of implementing and administering the administrative, enforcement, and regulatory recommendations of the statewide work plan developed by the committee. This bill would require that all expenditures be reasonable and would prohibit the secretary from seeking reimbursement for costs that exceed expenditures developed by the committee without first notifying the committee of the additional expenditures. Hide

SB 1019 (2013-2014) - An Act to Add Section 19094 to the Business and Professions Code, Relating to Business.

Upholstered furniture: flame retardant chemicals

Mark Leno / The bill has become law (chaptered).

Existing federal law requires the Consumer Product Safety Commission to institute proceedings for the determination of an appropriate flammability standard if the commission finds that such a standard, including labeling, for a fabric, related material, or product, may be needed to protect the public. Existing federal law authorizes a state to establish a flammability standard if, among other… More
Existing federal law requires the Consumer Product Safety Commission to institute proceedings for the determination of an appropriate flammability standard if the commission finds that such a standard, including labeling, for a fabric, related material, or product, may be needed to protect the public. Existing federal law authorizes a state to establish a flammability standard if, among other things, it provides a higher degree of protection from the risk of fire. Existing state law, the Home Furnishings and Thermal Insulation Act, provides for the licensure and regulation of upholstered furniture manufacturers by the Bureau of Electronic and Appliance Repair, Home Furnishings, and Thermal Insulation. Existing state law requires every upholstered-furniture manufacturer to hold a furniture and bedding manufacturer’s license. Existing state law also requires every upholstered-furniture retailer to hold a retail furniture dealer’s license. A violation of the act is a crime and each offense is punishable by a fine, as specified. Existing state law requires certain upholstered furniture to contain a specified label that is permanently attached in an area open to visible view. Existing state law establishes a standard to produce upholstered furniture which is safer from the hazards associated with smoldering ignition. This standard provides methods for smolder resistance of cover fabrics, barrier materials, resilient filling materials, and decking materials for use in upholstered furniture. This bill would require a manufacturer of covered products, as defined, to indicate whether or not the product contains added flame retardant chemicals, as defined, by including a specified statement on that label. The bill would require the manufacturer of the covered product to retain sufficient documentation to show whether flame retardant chemicals were added to a covered product or component. The bill would provide that a written statement by the supplier of each component attesting that flame retardant chemicals were added or not added is sufficient to make this showing. The bill would require the bureau to assess a fine for a violation of the documentation requirement or for failure to provide, upon request, the required documentation to the bureau, as specified. The bill would require a manufacturer of a covered product sold in California, upon request, to provide to the bureau, within 30 days of the request, documentation establishing the accuracy of the flame retardant chemical statement on the label. The bill would require the bureau to provide the Department of Toxic Substances Control with samples of the covered product or components thereof sold in California from products marked “contain NO added flame retardant chemicals” for testing for the presence of added flame retardant chemicals, as specified. If the department’s testing shows that a covered product labeled as “contain NO added flame retardant chemicals” is mislabeled because it contains added flame retardant chemicals, the bill would require the bureau to assess fines for violations against manufacturers of the covered product and component manufacturers, as specified. The bill would require the bureau to make information about any citation issued pursuant to its provisions available to the public on its Internet Web site. The bill would also make it the duty of the bureau to receive consumer complaints. The bill would authorize the bureau to adopt regulations to carry out these provisions. Because a violation of the bill’s requirements would be a crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide

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SB 1138 (2013-2014) - An Act to Add Sections 110796 and 114092 to the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Fish and Shellfish.

Fish and shellfish: labeling and identification

Alex Padilla / This bill was passed by both houses and vetoed by the Governor. It did not become law.

(1)Existing federal law, the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, regulates, among other things, the labeling of foods introduced or delivered for introduction into interstate commerce and generally prohibits the misbranding of food. Existing state law, the Sherman Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Law, generally regulates misbranded food, which includes food that is not properly labeled. A violation of… More
(1)Existing federal law, the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, regulates, among other things, the labeling of foods introduced or delivered for introduction into interstate commerce and generally prohibits the misbranding of food. Existing state law, the Sherman Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Law, generally regulates misbranded food, which includes food that is not properly labeled. A violation of these provisions is a crime. This bill, commencing July 1, 2016, would provide that it is unlawful to sell or offer for sale any fresh, frozen, or processed fish or shellfish intended for human consumption, wild caught or farm raised, without clearly identifying specified information, including the species of fish or shellfish by its common name, as specified. The bill would prohibit any person who sells or offers for sale any fish or shellfish and acts in reasonable reliance on the fish or shellfish package labeling and product invoice to satisfy the above-described requirements from being found in violation of those requirements. The bill would specify that these provisions do not apply to a restaurant. Because any violation of these provisions would be a crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. (2)Existing law, the California Retail Food Code, provides for the regulation of health and sanitation standards for retail food facilities, as defined, by the State Department of Public Health. Under existing law, local health agencies are primarily responsible for enforcing the California Retail Food Code. A violation of any of these provisions is punishable as a crime. Existing law requires fish that are received for sale or service to be commercially and legally caught or harvested. This bill, commencing July 1, 2016, would require a retail food facility, other than a restaurant, that sells or offers for sale any fresh, frozen, or processed fish or shellfish intended for human consumption, wild caught or farm raised, to identify in writing the species of fish or shellfish by its common name, as specified, and would prohibit a retail food facility from knowingly misidentifying the species of fish or shellfish. The bill, commencing July 1, 2016, would require a restaurant that sells or offers for sale any fresh, frozen, or processed fish or shellfish intended for human consumption, wild caught or farm raised, to identify the species of fish or shellfish by its common name in writing, or orally if not identified in writing, as specified, and would prohibit a restaurant from knowingly misidentifying the species of fish or shellfish. The bill, commencing July 1, 2016, would prohibit a retail food facility from knowingly misidentifying the country of origin of the fish or shellfish or whether the fish or shellfish was farm raised or wild caught. The bill would prohibit a retail food facility or restaurant that sells or offers for sale any fish or shellfish and acts in reasonable reliance on the fish or shellfish package labeling and product invoice to satisfy the above-described requirements from being found in violation of those requirements. Because any violation of these provisions would be a crime, and by imposing additional duties on local health officers, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. (3)The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that with regard to certain mandates no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. With regard to any other mandates, this bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs so mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above. Hide

SB 1172 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend Section 49455 of the Education Code, Relating to Pupil Health.

Pupil health: vision appraisals

Darrell Steinberg / The bill has become law (chaptered).

Existing law requires, upon first enrollment in a California school district of a child at an elementary school, and at least every 3rd year thereafter until the child has completed the 8th grade, the child’s vision to be appraised by the school nurse or other authorized person, as specified. Existing law requires this appraisal to include tests for visual acuity and color vision. Existing law… More
Existing law requires, upon first enrollment in a California school district of a child at an elementary school, and at least every 3rd year thereafter until the child has completed the 8th grade, the child’s vision to be appraised by the school nurse or other authorized person, as specified. Existing law requires this appraisal to include tests for visual acuity and color vision. Existing law requires gross external observation of the child’s eyes, visual performance, and perception to be done by the school nurse and the classroom teacher. This bill would instead require a pupil’s vision to be appraised by the school nurse or other authorized person during kindergarten or upon first enrollment or entry in a California school district of a pupil at an elementary school, and in grades 2, 5, and 8, except as provided. The bill would revise the functions to be performed by the school nurse and the classroom teacher in observing a pupil’s eyes, appearance, and other factors that may indicate vision difficulties. The bill would require the State Department of Education to adopt guidelines to implement those provisions, including training requirements and a method of testing for near vision. Because the bill would impose additional duties on public schools, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The bill would incorporate changes to Section 49455 of the Education Code proposed by both this bill and AB 1840 which would become operative only if both bills are enacted and become effective on or before January 1, 2015, and this bill is enacted last. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to these statutory provisions. Hide

SB 1211 (2013-2014) - An Act to Add Section 53121 to the Government Code, and to Amend Section 41030 of the Revenue and Taxation Code, Relating to Emergency Services.

Emergency services: Next Generation 911

Alex Padilla / The bill has become law (chaptered).

Existing law requires the Office of Emergency Services to determine annually, on or before October 1, a surcharge rate that it estimates will produce sufficient revenue to fund the current fiscal year’s 911 costs, as specified. This bill would require the office to develop a plan and timeline of target dates for testing, implementing, and operating a Next Generation 911 emergency communication… More
Existing law requires the Office of Emergency Services to determine annually, on or before October 1, a surcharge rate that it estimates will produce sufficient revenue to fund the current fiscal year’s 911 costs, as specified. This bill would require the office to develop a plan and timeline of target dates for testing, implementing, and operating a Next Generation 911 emergency communication system, including text to 911 service, throughout California. The bill would require the office, in determining the surcharge rate, to additionally include costs it expects to incur, consistent with the plan and timeline, to plan, test, implement, and operate Next Generation 911 technology and services, including text to 911 service. The bill would require the office, at least one month before determining the surcharge rate, to prepare a summary of the calculation of the proposed surcharge and make it available to the Legislature and the 911 Advisory Board, and on the office’s Internet Web site. This bill would incorporate additional changes in Section 41030 of the Revenue and Taxation Code, proposed by AB 1717, to be operative only if AB 1717 and this bill are both chaptered and become effective on or before January 1, 2015, and this bill is chaptered last. Hide

SB 1235 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend Sections 113789 and 114289 of the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Food.

Prepackaged food

Steve Knight / The bill has become law (chaptered).

Existing law, the California Retail Food Code, establishes uniform health and sanitation standards for retail food facilities, as defined. Existing law exempts from the definition of food facility a premises set aside by a beer manufacturer for the purposes of beer tasting, if no other beverage except for beer and prepackaged nonpotentially hazardous beverages is offered for sale for onsite… More
Existing law, the California Retail Food Code, establishes uniform health and sanitation standards for retail food facilities, as defined. Existing law exempts from the definition of food facility a premises set aside by a beer manufacturer for the purposes of beer tasting, if no other beverage except for beer and prepackaged nonpotentially hazardous beverages is offered for sale for onsite consumption and no food, except crackers or pretzels, is served. Existing law defines “potentially hazardous food” and “prepackaged food” for these purposes. Existing law provides that local health agencies are primarily responsible for enforcing these provisions. A person who violates any provision of the code is guilty of a misdemeanor, except as otherwise provided. This bill would additionally exclude from the definition of food facility a premises set aside by a beer manufacturer for the purposes of beer tasting that offers for onsite consumption prepackaged food that is not potentially hazardous food. The bill would limit the food display area in these facilities to 25 square feet and would make these facilities subject to specified provisions of the retail food code. By expanding the definition of a crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. This bill would incorporate additional changes to Section 113789 of the Health and Safety Code, proposed by SB 170 and AB 1990, that would become operative only if this bill and either or both of those bills are chaptered and become effective January 1, 2015, and this bill is chaptered last. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide

SB 1255 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend Section 647 of the Penal Code, Relating to Disorderly Conduct.

Disorderly conduct: unlawful distribution of image

Anthony Cannella / The bill has become law (chaptered).

Existing law provides that any person who photographs or records by any means the image of the intimate body part or parts of another identifiable person, under circumstances where the parties agree or understand that the image shall remain private, and the person subsequently distributes the image taken, with the intent to cause serious emotional distress, and the depicted person suffers serious… More
Existing law provides that any person who photographs or records by any means the image of the intimate body part or parts of another identifiable person, under circumstances where the parties agree or understand that the image shall remain private, and the person subsequently distributes the image taken, with the intent to cause serious emotional distress, and the depicted person suffers serious emotional distress, is guilty of disorderly conduct. This bill would instead provide that a person who intentionally distributes an image, as described, of the intimate body part or parts, as defined, of another identifiable person, or an image of the person depicted engaging in specified sexual acts, under circumstances in which the persons agree or understand that the image remain private, the person distributing the image knows or should know that distribution of the image will cause serious emotional distress, and the person depicted suffers that distress, is guilty of disorderly conduct. The bill would also provide that it is not a violation of this provision to distribute the image under certain circumstances, including where the distribution is made in the course of reporting an unlawful activity. The bill makes other technical and clarifying changes. Because this bill would broaden the scope of a crime, it would impose a state-mandated local program. The bill would incorporate additional changes to Section 647 of the Penal Code made by AB 1791 or SB 1388 that would become operative if either bill is chaptered on or before January 1, 2015, and this bill is chaptered last. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide

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SB 1365 (2013-2014) - An Act to Add the Heading of Article 1 (Commencing with Section 14025) and the Heading of Article 2 (Commencing with Section 14027) To, and to Add Article 3 (Commencing with Section 14040) To, Chapter 1.5 of Division 14 of the Elections Code, Relating to Elections.

California Voting Rights Act of 2001

Alex Padilla / This bill was passed by both houses and vetoed by the Governor. It did not become law.

Existing law, the California Voting Rights Act of 2001 (CVRA), prohibits the use of an at-large election in a political subdivision if it would impair the ability of a protected class, as defined, to elect candidates of its choice or otherwise influence the outcome of an election. The CVRA provides that a voter who is a member of a protected class may bring an action in superior court to enforce… More
Existing law, the California Voting Rights Act of 2001 (CVRA), prohibits the use of an at-large election in a political subdivision if it would impair the ability of a protected class, as defined, to elect candidates of its choice or otherwise influence the outcome of an election. The CVRA provides that a voter who is a member of a protected class may bring an action in superior court to enforce the provisions of the CVRA, and, if the voter prevails in the case, he or she may be awarded reasonable litigation costs and attorney’s fees. The CVRA requires a court to implement appropriate remedies, including the imposition of district-based elections, that are tailored to remedy a violation of the act. This bill would provide parallel provisions that prohibit the use of a district-based election in a political subdivision if it would impair the ability of a protected class, as defined, to elect candidates of its choice or otherwise influence the outcome of an election. The bill would require a court to implement specified remedies upon a finding that a district-based election was imposed or applied in a manner that impaired the ability of a protected class to elect candidates of its choice or otherwise influence the outcome of an election. Hide

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SB 1395 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend Section 115880 of the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Public Beaches.

Public beaches: inspection for contaminants

Marty Block / The bill has become law (chaptered).

Existing law requires the State Department of Public Health to adopt regulations for the minimum public health standards of public beaches, including requiring the testing of waters adjacent to all public beaches for specified microbial contaminants. Existing law authorizes the department to require testing of the waters adjacent to all public beaches for additional microbial indicators if the… More
Existing law requires the State Department of Public Health to adopt regulations for the minimum public health standards of public beaches, including requiring the testing of waters adjacent to all public beaches for specified microbial contaminants. Existing law authorizes the department to require testing of the waters adjacent to all public beaches for additional microbial indicators if the department establishes that those indicators are as protective of the public health. This bill would authorize the department to allow a local health officer to use specified polymerase chain reaction testing methods published by the United States Environmental Protection Agency or approved as an alternative test procedure pursuant to federal law to determine the level of enterococci bacteria as a single test based on a single indicator at one or more beach locations within that jurisdiction if the local health officer demonstrates through side-by-side testing over a beach season that the use of the test method provides a reliable indication of overall microbiological contamination conditions. The bill would require the department, in making the determination of whether to authorize the use of those testing methods by a local health officer, to take into account whether the alternative indicators and related test method can provide results more quickly. The bill would specify that its provisions do not require the use of those testing methods. Hide

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SB 1433 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend Section 20209.14 of the Public Contract Code, Relating to Transit Contracts.

Local Agency Public Construction Act: transit design-build contracts

Jerry Hill / The bill has become law (chaptered).

The Local Agency Public Construction Act until January 1, 2015, authorizes a transit operator, as defined, to enter into a design-build contract, as specified. Existing law requires certain information submitted in this regard to be provided under penalty of perjury. This bill would extend the authorization for a transit operator to enter into a design-build contract until January 1, 2017.… More
The Local Agency Public Construction Act until January 1, 2015, authorizes a transit operator, as defined, to enter into a design-build contract, as specified. Existing law requires certain information submitted in this regard to be provided under penalty of perjury. This bill would extend the authorization for a transit operator to enter into a design-build contract until January 1, 2017. Because the bill would expand the crime of perjury, it would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide