California Bills: Search Results

Results 1-10 of 5,526 bills

SB 1372 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend Sections 18410.2 and 23151 Of, and to Add Section 23635 To, the Revenue and Taxation Code, Relating to Taxation, to Take Effect Immediately, Tax Levy.

Corporation taxes: tax rates: publicly held corporations: credits

Mark DeSaulnier, Loni Hancock / The bill was voted on by the Senate on August 28, 2014.

(1)The Corporation Tax Law imposes taxes according to or measured by net income at a rate of 8.84%, or for financial institutions, at a rate of 10.84%, as specified. This bill would, for taxable years beginning on and after January 1, 2015, revise that rate for taxpayers that are publicly held corporations, as defined, and instead impose a tax rate from 7% to 13%, or for financial… More
(1)The Corporation Tax Law imposes taxes according to or measured by net income at a rate of 8.84%, or for financial institutions, at a rate of 10.84%, as specified. This bill would, for taxable years beginning on and after January 1, 2015, revise that rate for taxpayers that are publicly held corporations, as defined, and instead impose a tax rate from 7% to 13%, or for financial institutions, from 9% to 15%, based on the compensation ratio, as defined, of the corporation. This bill would increase the applicable tax rate by 50% for those taxpayers that have a specified decrease in full-time employees employed in the United States as compared to an increase in contracted and foreign full-time employees, as described.(2)Existing law establishes the California Competes Tax Credit Committee, which has specified duties in regard to tax credits for economic development. Existing law establishes the Governor's Office of Business and Economic Development, also known as “GO-Biz,” to, among other duties, serve the Governor as the lead entity for economic strategy and the marketing of California on issues relating to business development, private sector investment, and economic growth. The Corporation Tax Law allows various credits against the tax imposed by that law. This bill, for taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2015, would allow a credit to a qualified taxpayer, as defined, in an amount as provided in a written agreement between GO-Biz and the qualified taxpayer, agreed upon by the committee, and based on specified factors, including the number of jobs the qualified taxpayer will create or retain in the state and the amount of investment in the state by the qualified taxpayer. The bill would limit the total amount of the credit available to an amount equal to the amount of revenue generated by the application of the above-referenced tax rates on publicly held corporations. The bill would also impose various duties upon GO-Biz, including the adoption of regulations.(3)This bill would include a change in state statute that would result in a taxpayer paying a higher tax within the meaning of Section 3 of Article XIIIA of the California Constitution, and thus would require for passage the approval of 23 of the membership of each house of the Legislature. This act provides for a tax levy within the meaning of Article IV of the Constitution and shall go into immediate effect. Hide

SB 1441 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend Section 82015 of the Government Code, Relating to the Political Reform Act of 1974.

Political Reform Act of 1974: contributions

Ricardo Lara, Ellen Corbett, Kevin De Leon, Jerry Hill, Bill Monning, Richard Roth, Darrell Steinberg, Norma Torres / The bill was voted on by the Senate on August 28, 2014.

Existing law, the Political Reform Act of 1974, provides for the comprehensive regulation of campaign financing, including requiring the reporting of campaign contributions and expenditures and imposing other reporting and recordkeeping requirements on campaign committees. “Contribution” is defined for purposes of the act as a payment, a forgiveness of a loan, a payment of a loan by a third… More
Existing law, the Political Reform Act of 1974, provides for the comprehensive regulation of campaign financing, including requiring the reporting of campaign contributions and expenditures and imposing other reporting and recordkeeping requirements on campaign committees. “Contribution” is defined for purposes of the act as a payment, a forgiveness of a loan, a payment of a loan by a third party, or an enforceable promise to make a payment, except to the extent that full and adequate consideration is received, unless it is clear from the surrounding circumstances that it is not made for political purposes. The definition does not include a payment made by an occupant of a home or office for costs related to any meeting or fundraising event held in the occupant’s home or office if the costs for the meeting or fundraising event are $500 or less. The act prohibits a lobbyist from making, and an elected state officer or candidate for elective state office from accepting, a contribution if the lobbyist is registered to lobby the governmental agency for which the candidate is seeking election or the governmental agency of the elected state officer. This bill would revise the definition of “contribution” to include a payment made by a lobbyist or a cohabitant of a lobbyist for costs related to a fundraising event held at the home of the lobbyist, as specified. The bill would make these payments attributable to the lobbyist for purposes of the prohibition against a lobbyist making a contribution to specified candidates and elected officers. The bill would also revise the definition of “contribution” to include a payment made by a lobbying firm for costs related to a fundraising event held at the office of the lobbying firm. A violation of the act’s provisions is punishable as a misdemeanor. By expanding the scope of an existing crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. The Political Reform Act of 1974, an initiative measure, provides that the Legislature may amend the act to further the act’s purposes upon a 23 vote of each house and compliance with specified procedural requirements. This bill would declare that it furthers the purposes of the act. Hide

SB 1275 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend Section 44125 Of, and to Add Chapter 8.5 (Commencing with Section 44258) to Part 5 of Division 26 Of, the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Vehicular Air Pollution.

Vehicle retirement and replacement: Charge Ahead California Initiative

Kevin De Leon / The bill was voted on by the Senate on August 28, 2014.

(1)Existing law creates an enhanced fleet modernization program for the retirement of high polluting vehicles to be administered by the Bureau of Automotive Repair pursuant to guidelines adopted by the State Air Resources Board. Existing law requires the program’s guidelines to be updated no later than June 30, 2015. Existing law requires the updated guidelines to ensure vehicle replacement be… More
(1)Existing law creates an enhanced fleet modernization program for the retirement of high polluting vehicles to be administered by the Bureau of Automotive Repair pursuant to guidelines adopted by the State Air Resources Board. Existing law requires the program’s guidelines to be updated no later than June 30, 2015. Existing law requires the updated guidelines to ensure vehicle replacement be an option for all motor vehicle owners and may be in addition to compensation for vehicles retired, as specified. This bill would require the updated guidelines to ensure there be a mobility option, as defined, and that the compensation for a mobility option be no less than $2,500. The bill would authorize the state board to increase the amount of the mobility option as necessary to maximize the air quality benefits of the program while also ensuring participation by low-income motor vehicle owners, as specified. The bill also would require the updated guidelines to ensure the inclusion of car sharing, as specified. (2)Existing law establishes the Air Quality Improvement Program that is administered by the State Air Resources Board for the purposes of funding projects related to, among other things, reduction of criteria air pollutants and improvement of air quality. Pursuant to the Air Quality Improvement Program, the state board has established the Clean Vehicle Rebate Project to promote the production and use of zero-emission vehicles and the Hybrid and Zero-Emission Truck and Bus Voucher Incentive Project to provide vouchers to help California fleets to purchase hybrid and zero-emission trucks and buses. This bill would establish the Charge Ahead California Initiative to be administered by the state board, in consultation with the State Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission, air pollution control and air quality management districts, and the public. The bill would state that the goals of the initiative are to, among other things, place in service at least 1,000,000 zero-emission and near-zero-emission vehicles by January 1, 2023, and to increase access for disadvantaged, low-income, and moderate-income communities and consumers to zero-emission and near-zero-emission vehicles. The bill would require the state board to include, commencing with the Air Quality Improvement Program funding plan for the 2016–17 fiscal year, a specified funding plan that includes the immediate fiscal year and a forecast of estimated funding needs for the subsequent 2 years commensurate with meeting the goals of the Charge Ahead California Initiative; to update the plan at least every 3 years through January 1, 2023; to adopt, no later than June 30, 2015, specified revisions to the criteria and other requirements for the Clean Vehicle Rebate Project; and to establish programs that further increase access to and direct benefits for disadvantaged, low-income, and moderate-income communities and consumers from electric transportation. Hide

SB 1094 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend Sections 5915 and 5921 Of, and to Add Sections 5926 and 5927 To, the Corporations Code, Relating to Health Facilities.

Nonprofit health facilities: sale of assets: Attorney General approval

Ricardo Lara / The bill was voted on by the Assembly on August 28, 2014.

Existing law requires any nonprofit corporation that is subject to the Nonprofit Public Benefit Corporation Law that operates or controls a health facility, as defined, or operates or controls a facility that provides similar health care to provide written notice to, and obtain the written consent of, the Attorney General prior to selling or otherwise disposing of a material amount of its assets… More
Existing law requires any nonprofit corporation that is subject to the Nonprofit Public Benefit Corporation Law that operates or controls a health facility, as defined, or operates or controls a facility that provides similar health care to provide written notice to, and obtain the written consent of, the Attorney General prior to selling or otherwise disposing of a material amount of its assets to a for-profit corporation or entity, to a mutual benefit corporation or entity, or to another nonprofit corporation or entity. Existing law requires the Attorney General to conduct one or more public meetings prior to issuing its decision whether to consent to the proposed agreement or transaction, and, in any case, to issue its decision within 60 days of the receipt of the written notice from the public benefit corporation, subject to one additional 45-day extension under specified circumstances. This bill would instead require the Attorney General to issue its decision within 90 days of the receipt of the written notice from the public benefit corporation. The bill would additionally authorize the Attorney General to enforce conditions imposed on the approval of an agreement or transaction, and to require the transferee to fulfill all representations made during the application process, as specified. The bill would authorize the Attorney General to amend the conditions after the decision is issued under specified circumstances. The bill would additionally provide that once the agreement or transaction is closed, the parties to the transaction are deemed to have explicitly and implicitly consented to the applicability and compliance with each condition, except for an amended condition, set forth by the Attorney General, as specified. Hide

7.7 times as much $
Support
Oppose

SB 18 (2013-2014) - An Act Relating to Medi-Cal, and Making an Appropriation Therefor.

Medi-Cal renewal

Mark Leno, Ed Hernandez / The bill was voted on by the Senate on August 28, 2014.

Existing law provides for the Medi-Cal program, which is administered by the State Department of Health Care Services, under which qualified low-income individuals receive health care services. The Medi-Cal program is, in part, governed and funded by federal Medicaid Program provisions. Existing law establishes the Healthcare Outreach and Medi-Cal Enrollment Account to collect and allocate… More
Existing law provides for the Medi-Cal program, which is administered by the State Department of Health Care Services, under which qualified low-income individuals receive health care services. The Medi-Cal program is, in part, governed and funded by federal Medicaid Program provisions. Existing law establishes the Healthcare Outreach and Medi-Cal Enrollment Account to collect and allocate non-General Fund public or private grant funds for expenditure, upon appropriation of the Legislature, for outreach to and enrollment of target Medi-Cal populations and to compensate Medi-Cal in-person assisters. This bill would require the State Department of Health Care Services to accept contributions by private foundations in the amount of at least $6,000,000 for the purpose of providing Medi-Cal renewal assistance payments, as specified. The bill would also appropriate $6,000,000 from the Healthcare Outreach and Medi-Cal Enrollment Account and $6,000,000 from the Federal Trust Fund, to be available for encumbrance or expenditure until December 31, 2016, and authorize the use of previously appropriated funds in that account for this purpose. The bill would require the department to seek federal matching funds for the contributions to the extent permissible for training, testing, certifying, supporting, and compensating persons and entities providing renewal assistance and for any other permissible renewal assistance related activities, and to seek all necessary federal approvals for purposes of obtaining federal funding. The bill would also require the department, in collaboration with the County Welfare Directors Association and legal services organizations, to develop renewal assistance training for employees of community-based organizations, as specified. Hide

SB 267 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend Section 60852.2 of the Education Code, Relating to Pupil Assessment.

Pupil assessment: high school exit examination: eligible pupils with disabilities

Fran Pavley / The bill was voted on by the Senate on August 28, 2014.

Existing law requires each pupil completing grade 12 to successfully pass the high school exit examination as a condition of receiving a diploma of graduation or as a condition of graduation from high school. Existing law requires the State Board of Education, taking into consideration certain findings and recommendations, to adopt regulations for alternative means by which eligible pupils with… More
Existing law requires each pupil completing grade 12 to successfully pass the high school exit examination as a condition of receiving a diploma of graduation or as a condition of graduation from high school. Existing law requires the State Board of Education, taking into consideration certain findings and recommendations, to adopt regulations for alternative means by which eligible pupils with disabilities may demonstrate that they have achieved the same level of academic achievement in the content standards required for passage of the high school exit examination. Existing law defines an “eligible pupil with a disability” as a pupil who has an individualized education program or other specified plan that indicates that the pupil has an anticipated graduation date and is scheduled to receive a high school diploma on or after July 1, 2015, who has not passed the high school exit examination but has attempted to pass those sections not yet passed, as specified, and who the school district or state special school certifies has satisfied or will satisfy all other state and local requirements for the receipt of a high school diploma on or after July 1, 2015. Existing law exempts an eligible pupil with a disability from being required to pass the high school exit examination as a condition of receiving a diploma of graduation or as a condition of graduation from high school until the state board makes a determination that the alternative means by which an eligible pupil with disabilities may demonstrate the same level of academic achievement in the portions of, or those content standards required for passage of, the high school exit examination are not feasible or that the alternative means are implemented. Existing law authorizes an eligible pupil with a disability, commencing July 1, 2015, to participate in the alternative means of demonstrating the level of academic achievement in the content standards required for passage of the high school exit examination in the manner prescribed by the regulations adopted by the state board. Existing law authorizes the state board to extend that date by up to one year, as provided. This bill would revise the definition of an “eligible pupil with a disability” by revising the date by which a pupil is required to be scheduled to receive a high school diploma and the date by which the school district or state special school is required to certify that the pupil has satisfied or will satisfy all other state and local requirements for the receipt of a high school diploma to the pupil’s anticipated graduation date. The bill would also revise the commencement date for an eligible pupil with a disability to participate in the alternative means of demonstrating the level of academic achievement in the required content standards to be contingent upon the state board’s determination that the alternative means have been implemented. The bill would also repeal the state board’s authority to extend that date. Hide

SB 1440 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend Section 1012.3 of the Military and Veterans Code, Relating to Veterans.

Veterans’ homes: fees and charges

Lois Wolk / The bill was voted on by the Senate on August 28, 2014.

Existing law provides for the establishment and operation of the Veterans Home of California at various sites for aged and disabled veterans who meet certain eligibility requirements. Existing law requires members of the homes to pay fees and charges as determined by the department, but prohibits the total of the member’s fees and charges for specified types of care for any fiscal year to be… More
Existing law provides for the establishment and operation of the Veterans Home of California at various sites for aged and disabled veterans who meet certain eligibility requirements. Existing law requires members of the homes to pay fees and charges as determined by the department, but prohibits the total of the member’s fees and charges for specified types of care for any fiscal year to be greater than a certain percentage of the member’s annual income. Existing law also requires nonveteran spouses who become members of the home on or after July 1, 2009, to pay fees and charges based on the level of care, as specified, or an amount equal to the annual amount of federal per diem received for a veteran member in domiciliary care, whichever is greater, as provided. This bill would instead require nonveteran spouses to pay the same fees and charges as paid by the veteran members of the home, as determined by the department and subject to the same prohibitions.This bill would incorporate additional changes to Section 1012.3 of the Military and Veterans Code proposed by AB 614 that would become operative if this bill and AB 614 are both chaptered and this bill is chaptered last. Hide

SB 1438 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend Sections 1797.170, 1797.197, and 11601 of the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Controlled Substances.

Controlled substances: opioid antagonists

Fran Pavley / The bill was voted on by the Senate on August 28, 2014.

(1)Existing law, the Emergency Medical Services System and the Prehospital Emergency Medical Care Personnel Act, establishes the Emergency Medical Services Authority (EMSA), which is responsible for the coordination and integration of all state agencies concerning emergency medical services. Under existing law, EMSA is required to establish training and standards, and promulgate regulations, for… More
(1)Existing law, the Emergency Medical Services System and the Prehospital Emergency Medical Care Personnel Act, establishes the Emergency Medical Services Authority (EMSA), which is responsible for the coordination and integration of all state agencies concerning emergency medical services. Under existing law, EMSA is required to establish training and standards, and promulgate regulations, for all prehospital emergency medical care personnel, as defined, regarding the characteristics and method of assessment and treatment of anaphylactic reactions and the use of epinephrine. Existing law also requires the EMSA to develop and adopt regulations for the training and scope of practice for emergency medical technician-I (EMT-I) certification, which includes, among other things, a specified course of training on the nature of sudden infant death syndrome. Existing law authorizes the medical director of a local EMS agency to approve or conduct any scientific or trial study of the efficacy of the prehospital emergency use of any drug, device, or treatment procedure within the local EMS system, utilizing any level of prehospital emergency medical care personnel, consistent with specified requirements. This bill would require the EMSA to develop and adopt training and standards, and promulgate regulations, for all prehospital emergency medical care personnel, as defined, regarding the use and administration of naloxone hydrochloride and other opioid antagonists. The bill would authorize the EMSA to adopt existing training and standards for prehospital emergency medical care personnel regarding the statewide use and administration of naloxone hydrochloride or another opioid antagonist to satisfy the requirements of the bill’s provisions. The bill would also authorize the medical director of a local EMS agency, pursuant to the above-described provisions relating to a scientific or trial study, to approve or conduct a trial study of the use and administration of naloxone hydrochloride or other opioid antagonists by any level of prehospital emergency medical care personnel, and would authorize the training received by prehospital emergency medical care personnel specific to the use and administration of naloxone hydrochloride or other opioid antagonists during this trial study to be used towards satisfying the training requirements established by the EMSA pursuant to the bill’s provisions. The bill would specify that both of those types of trainings satisfy specified requirements allowing for immunity from criminal and civil liability for administering an opioid antagonist. The bill would also require the EMSA to develop and adopt regulations to include the administration of naloxone hydrochloride in the training and scope of practice of EMT-I certification, on or before July 1, 2016. The bill would require these regulations to be substantially similar to certain regulations that authorize an EMT-I to receive training for naloxone hydrochloride administration without having to complete the entire emergency medical technician-II (EMT-II) certification course.(2)Existing law, the Uniform Controlled Substances Act, requires the Attorney General to encourage research on the misuse and abuse of controlled substances, and, in connection with that research, and in furtherance of the enforcement of the act, authorizes the Attorney General to undertake specific acts, including developing new or improved approaches, techniques, systems, equipment, and devices to strengthen the enforcement of the act. This bill would additionally permit the Attorney General, in connection with that research, and in furtherance of the enforcement of the act, to authorize hospitals and trauma centers to share information with local law enforcement agencies, the EMSA, and local emergency medical services agencies about controlled substances. The bill would limit the data that may be provided by hospitals and trauma centers to the number of overdoses and the substances suspected as the primary cause of the overdoses. The bill would require that the information shared be shared in a manner that ensures complete patient confidentiality. Hide

SB 1405 (2013-2014) - An Act to Add Section 8593.2 to the Business and Professions Code, to Amend Sections 17609, 17610, 17611, and 17612 Of, and to Add Sections 17611.5 and 17614 To, the Education Code, and to Amend Sections 12996, 12999.4, 13181, 13182, 13183, and 13187 Of, and to Add Section 13186.5 To, the Food and Agricultural Code, Relating to Pesticides.

Pesticides: schoolsites

Mark DeSaulnier / The bill was voted on by the Senate on August 28, 2014.

(1)Existing law, the Healthy Schools Act of 2000, requires each schoolsite to maintain records of all pesticide use at the schoolsite for a period of 4 years and to make these records available to the public upon request, as specified. Existing law authorizes a schoolsite to meet these requirements by retaining a copy of the warning sign posted for each pesticide application, as specified, and… More
(1)Existing law, the Healthy Schools Act of 2000, requires each schoolsite to maintain records of all pesticide use at the schoolsite for a period of 4 years and to make these records available to the public upon request, as specified. Existing law authorizes a schoolsite to meet these requirements by retaining a copy of the warning sign posted for each pesticide application, as specified, and recording on the copy the amount of pesticide used. Existing law requires a schoolsite or school district to identify an individual, known as a school designee, to carry out the requirements of the act. This bill, if a schoolsite chooses to use certain pesticides, would require the school designee, at the end of each calendar year, or more often at his or her discretion, to submit to the Director of Pesticide Regulation a copy of the records, as specified, of all pesticide use at the schoolsite. The bill, if a schoolsite chooses to use certain pesticides, would require the school designee to develop and post on the Internet Web site of the schoolsite, or, if the schoolsite does not maintain an Internet Web site, the school district, an integrated pest management plan, as defined, for the schoolsite or school district, except if neither the schoolsite nor the school district maintains an Internet Web site, the school designee would be required to include the integrated pest management plan with a certain annual notification sent to staff and parents or guardians of pupils enrolled at the schoolsite. The bill would authorize a school designee to do these things related to an integrated pest management plan if the schoolsite does not choose to use certain pesticides. (2)Existing law requires the Department of Pesticide Regulation to promote and facilitate the voluntary adoption of integrated pest management programs for schoolsites that voluntarily choose to do so, excluding privately operated child day care facilities. For these schoolsites, existing law requires the department to establish an integrated pest management program for schoolsites. Existing law, in establishing the program, requires the department to develop criteria for identifying least-hazardous pest control practices and encourage their adoption as part of an integrated pest management program at each schoolsite and develop a model program guidebook, as specified, that prescribes essential program elements for schoolsites that have adopted a least-hazardous integrated pest management program. Existing law provides that a violation of the laws, and the regulations adopted pursuant to those laws, relating to pesticides is generally a misdemeanor. This bill would require the Department of Pesticide Regulation to develop a training course to train any person who intends to apply pesticides on a schoolsite, and would require the training course to cover integrated pest management and the safe use of pesticides in relation to the unique nature of schoolsites and children’s health. The bill would require the training course to be provided by the department or an agent authorized by the department. The bill would, commencing July 1, 2016, and except as provided, require a school designee, and any person who intends to apply a pesticide at a schoolsite subject to the act, to annually complete a training course provided by the department or an agent authorized by the department. The bill would, commencing July 1, 2016, require any person hired to apply a pesticide at a schoolsite subject to the act, to complete at least a one-hour training course in integrated pest management and the safe use of pesticides in relation to the unique nature of schoolsites and children’s health before applying pesticides at such a schoolsite, and during each subsequent licensing period in which he or she applies a pesticide at a schoolsite subject to the act, and would provide that this training course may be applied to his or her professional continuing education requirements. The bill would require the one-hour training course to be developed by the department, would authorize a provider approved by the Structural Pest Control Board to also develop the one-hour training course if the training course has been approved by the department, and would require the department to ensure that the one-hour training course it develops or approves meets the requirements for continuing education credit required by the Structural Pest Control Board and the department. The bill would exclude the violation of the provisions requiring the completion of an annual training course from being a crime.(3)Existing law provides for the regulation of registered structural pest control companies by the Structural Pest Control Board. Existing law authorizes any individual 18 years of age or over to apply for a license as an operator, field representative, or applicator, as specified. Existing law requires the board to require as a condition of the renewal of an operator’s, field representative’s, or applicator’s license that the licenseholder submit proof satisfactory to the board that he or she has completed courses of continuing education in pest control or pesticide application and use approved by the board or equivalent activity approved by the board. Existing law provides that any person who violates any provision related to structural pest control operators, or who conspires with another person to violate those provisions, is guilty of a misdemeanor and is punishable, as specified.This bill, commencing July 1, 2016, would require a licensee to comply with the training requirements of the Healthy Schools Act of 2000 if the licensee intends to apply a pesticide at a schoolsite, as defined. The bill would provide that training courses completed in furtherance of the Healthy Schools Act of 2000 count toward the continuing education requirements of the board and qualify as continuing education in integrated pest management. By expanding the scope of a crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.(4)The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.(5)This bill would make conforming changes and various nonsubstantive changes. Hide

SB 1391 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend Section 84810.5 Of, and to Add Section 84810.7 To, the Education Code, Relating to Community Colleges.

Community colleges: inmate education programs: computation of apportionments

Loni Hancock, Mark Wyland / The bill was voted on by the Senate on August 28, 2014.

Existing law establishes the California Community Colleges under the administration of the Board of Governors of the California Community Colleges. Existing law requires the board of governors to appoint a chief executive officer, to be known as the Chancellor of the California Community Colleges. Existing law provides that, notwithstanding open course provisions in statute or regulations of the… More
Existing law establishes the California Community Colleges under the administration of the Board of Governors of the California Community Colleges. Existing law requires the board of governors to appoint a chief executive officer, to be known as the Chancellor of the California Community Colleges. Existing law provides that, notwithstanding open course provisions in statute or regulations of the board of governors, the governing board of a community college district that provides classes for inmates of certain facilities may include the units of full-time equivalent students generated in those classes for purposes of state apportionments. This bill would instead waive the open course provisions in statute or regulations of the board of governors for any governing board of a community college district for classes the district provides to inmates of those facilities and state correctional facilities, and would authorize the board of governors to include the units of full-time equivalent students generated in those classes for purposes of state apportionments. Existing law provides for the method of computing apportionments for purposes of these inmate education programs. This bill would make revisions to that method of computation. The bill would prohibit a community college district from claiming, for purposes of apportionments for these inmate education programs, any class for which a district receives full compensation for its direct education costs for the conduct of the class from any public or private agency, individual, or group of individuals, or any class offered pursuant to a contract or instructional agreement entered into between the district and a public or private agency, individual, or group of individuals that has received from another source full compensation for the costs the district incurs under that contract or instructional agreement, as prescribed. This bill would require the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation and the Office of the Chancellor of the California Community Colleges, on or before March 1, 2015, to enter into an interagency agreement to expand access to community college courses that lead to degrees or certificates that result in enhanced workforce skills or transfer to a 4-year university. This bill would require that courses for inmates in a state correctional facility developed as a result of this agreement supplement, but not duplicate or supplant, any adult education course opportunities offered at that facility by the Office of Correctional Education of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation. This bill would require the department, in collaboration with the Office of the Chancellor of the California Community Colleges, to develop metrics for evaluations of the efficacy and success of the programs developed through the interagency agreement, conduct the evaluations, and, on or before July 31, 2018, report findings from the evaluations to the Legislature and the Governor. Hide