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AB 1503 (2013-2014) - An Act to Add Section 14672.54 to the Government Code, Relating to State Government.

Department of General Services

Beth Gaines / This bill was passed by both houses and vetoed by the Governor. It did not become law.

Existing law authorizes the Department of General Services, with the consent of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, to lease a parcel of unimproved real property within the grounds of the California State Prison at Folsom for a water reservoir, as specified. This bill would require the Department of General Services, with the consent of the Department of Corrections and… More
Existing law authorizes the Department of General Services, with the consent of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, to lease a parcel of unimproved real property within the grounds of the California State Prison at Folsom for a water reservoir, as specified. This bill would require the Department of General Services, with the consent of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, to lease vacant real property on the grounds of California State Prison at Folsom to the Old Guard Foundation, Inc., or a similar and related nonprofit entity, for the construction and operation of a peace officers memorial and museum facility. The bill would require, among other things, that the lease not exceed a 50-year term. The bill would provide that the construction and operation of the memorial and museum facility by the lessee pursuant to the lease are solely the responsibility of the lessee. Hide

AB 1890 (2013-2014) - An Act to Add Chapter 2.7 (Commencing with Section 18898) to Division 8 of the Business and Professions Code, Relating to Athletic Trainers.

Athletic trainers

Ed Chau / This bill was passed by both houses and vetoed by the Governor. It did not become law.

Existing law provides for the regulation of various professions and vocations, including those of an athlete agent. This bill would make it unlawful for any person to hold himself or herself out as an athletic trainer or a certified athletic trainer, or to use specified terms to imply or suggest that the person is an athletic trainer, unless he or she is certified by the Board of Certification,… More
Existing law provides for the regulation of various professions and vocations, including those of an athlete agent. This bill would make it unlawful for any person to hold himself or herself out as an athletic trainer or a certified athletic trainer, or to use specified terms to imply or suggest that the person is an athletic trainer, unless he or she is certified by the Board of Certification, Inc., and has either graduated from a college or university, after completing an accredited athletic training education program, as specified, or completed eligibility requirements for certification by the Board of Certification, Inc., prior to January 1, 2004. The bill would make it an unfair business practice to use the title “athletic trainer,” “certified athletic trainer,” or other specified terms that imply or suggest that the person is an athletic trainer if he or she does not meet the requirements described above. This bill, notwithstanding these provisions, would authorize a person who has worked as an athletic trainer in California for a period of 20 consecutive years prior to January 1, 2015, and who is not otherwise eligible to use the title “athletic trainer,” to use that title. Hide

AB 2419 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend Section 3502.5 of the Government Code, Relating to Public Employee Relations.

Public employee relations: agency shop arrangements

Cristina Garcia / This bill was passed by both houses and vetoed by the Governor. It did not become law.

Existing law, the Meyers-Milias-Brown Act, regulates labor relations between employees and management of local public agencies. Existing law permits an agency shop agreement to be negotiated between a public agency and a recognized public employee organization that has been recognized as the exclusive or majority bargaining agent and defines an agency shop as an arrangement that requires an… More
Existing law, the Meyers-Milias-Brown Act, regulates labor relations between employees and management of local public agencies. Existing law permits an agency shop agreement to be negotiated between a public agency and a recognized public employee organization that has been recognized as the exclusive or majority bargaining agent and defines an agency shop as an arrangement that requires an employee, as a condition of continued employment, to join the recognized employee organization or to pay the organization a service fee, as specified. Existing law permits an agency shop arrangement to be implemented without negotiation upon submission of a prescribed petition and a specified vote of the employees. Existing law prohibits an agency shop arrangement from applying to management employees. Existing law grants the employee relations commissions in the County of Los Angeles and the City of Los Angeles the authority to take certain actions that would otherwise be the responsibility of the Public Employment Relations Board. This bill would authorize the inclusion of management employees in an agency shop arrangement in the County of Los Angeles and the City of Los Angeles. This bill would make legislative findings and declarations as to the necessity of a special statute for the County of Los Angeles and the City of Los Angeles. Hide

AB 1113 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend, Repeal, and Add Section 12814.6 of the Vehicle Code, Relating to Vehicles.

Provisional driver’s licenses: restrictions

Jim Frazier / This bill was passed by both houses and vetoed by the Governor. It did not become law.

The Brady-Jared Teen Driver Safety Act of 1997 allows for the issuance of a driver’s license to an applicant who is at least 16 years of age but under 18 years of age pursuant to the provisional licensing program. Existing law requires a person to have held an instruction permit for at least 6 months prior to applying for a provisional driver’s license. A person licensed under this program is… More
The Brady-Jared Teen Driver Safety Act of 1997 allows for the issuance of a driver’s license to an applicant who is at least 16 years of age but under 18 years of age pursuant to the provisional licensing program. Existing law requires a person to have held an instruction permit for at least 6 months prior to applying for a provisional driver’s license. A person licensed under this program is prohibited during the first 12 months after issuance of a license from driving during the hours of 11 p.m. and 5 a.m. or from transporting passengers who are under 20 years of age, subject to specified exceptions. Under existing law, a violation of these provisions is an infraction. This bill would, commencing January 1, 2015, require that the restrictions on a person licensed under the provisional licensing program continue for the duration of the provisional license, and would additionally prohibit the licensee from driving between the hours of 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. or transporting passengers who are under 21 years of age, except as specified. The bill would require a person to have held an instruction permit for at least 9 months prior to applying for a provisional driver’s license. By expanding the scope of a crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide

AB 1127 (2013-2014) - An Act to Add and Repeal Sections 756 and 756.5 of the Evidence Code and Section 68567 of the Government Code, Relating to Legal Services.

Legal aid: court interpreters

Ed Chau / This bill was passed by both houses and vetoed by the Governor. It did not become law.

Existing law requires, when a witness is incapable of understanding the English language or expressing himself or herself in the English language so as to be understood directly by counsel, court, and jury, an interpreter to be sworn to interpret for him or her. Existing law requires the Judicial Council to conduct a study of language and interpreter use and need in court proceedings, with… More
Existing law requires, when a witness is incapable of understanding the English language or expressing himself or herself in the English language so as to be understood directly by counsel, court, and jury, an interpreter to be sworn to interpret for him or her. Existing law requires the Judicial Council to conduct a study of language and interpreter use and need in court proceedings, with commentary, and to report its findings and recommendations to the Governor and to the Legislature every 5 years. Existing law requires that this study serve as the basis for determining the need to establish interpreter programs and certification and for establishing these programs and examinations through the normal budgetary process. This bill would require the Judicial Council, by March 1, 2014, to establish a working group to review, identify, and develop best practices to provide interpreters in civil actions and proceedings, as specified. The bill would require the Judicial Council to select up to 3 courts to participate in a pilot project, to commence on July 1, 2014, to provide interpreters in civil proceedings and would require the Judicial Council to report to the Legislature findings related to the pilot project by July 1, 2018. The pilot project would be funded by an amount not to exceed $6 million dollars from the Trial Court Trust Fund, upon allocation by the Judicial Council pursuant to the Judicial Council’s existing expenditure authority, or upon appropriation by the Legislature, from unexpended funds previously allocated for court interpreter services. The bill would also require the working group to act as an advisory body to any Judicial Council committee, advisory board, or joint committee charged with developing a comprehensive statewide Language Access Plan (LAP) for use by courts to address the needs of all limited-English-proficient individuals in conformance with state and federal law. The bill would require the working group to make recommendations relating to the establishment of standards for meaningful and timely provision of language services in all court proceedings and at all public points of contact within the courts, and the establishment of a statewide plan to provide for the translation of court documents using competent and qualified interpreters. The bill would require the Judicial Council and its advisory bodies to submit an interim report to the Legislature on the status of the LAP by September 1, 2014. The bill would repeal these provisions on January 1, 2020. Hide

AB 1128 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend Section 25658 of the Business and Professions Code, Relating to Alcoholic Beverages.

Alcoholic beverages: underage drinking

Rudy Salas / This bill was passed by both houses and vetoed by the Governor. It did not become law.

Existing law provides that every person who sells, furnishes, gives, or causes to be sold, furnished, or given away an alcoholic beverage to a person under 21 years of age, or who purchases any alcoholic beverage for, or furnishes, gives, or gives away any alcoholic beverage to, a person under 21 years of age who thereafter consumes the alcohol and then causes great bodily injury or death to… More
Existing law provides that every person who sells, furnishes, gives, or causes to be sold, furnished, or given away an alcoholic beverage to a person under 21 years of age, or who purchases any alcoholic beverage for, or furnishes, gives, or gives away any alcoholic beverage to, a person under 21 years of age who thereafter consumes the alcohol and then causes great bodily injury or death to himself, herself, or any other person, is guilty of a misdemeanor. This bill would include in the provision regarding great bodily injury or death, described above, a person who sells any alcoholic beverage to a person under 21 years of age and would provide that a violation of the prohibition is also punishable as a felony subject to specified penalties where a person knew that a person to whom an alcoholic beverage was provided was under 21 years of age. The bill would provide for an exception from felony prosecution for a licensee or employee, agent, or representative of a licensee, unless the person had actual prior knowledge that the person to whom the alcoholic beverage was provided was under 21 years of age. By creating a new crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide

AB 1140 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend Section 1773.6 of the Labor Code, Relating to Public Works.

Public works: prevailing wages

Tom Daly / This bill was passed by both houses and vetoed by the Governor. It did not become law.

Existing law requires that, except as specified, not less than the general prevailing rate of per diem wages, determined by the Director of Industrial Relations, be paid to workers employed on public works projects. Existing law requires the body awarding a contract for a public work to obtain from the director the general prevailing rate of per diem wages for work of a similar character in the… More
Existing law requires that, except as specified, not less than the general prevailing rate of per diem wages, determined by the Director of Industrial Relations, be paid to workers employed on public works projects. Existing law requires the body awarding a contract for a public work to obtain from the director the general prevailing rate of per diem wages for work of a similar character in the locality in which the public work is to be performed, and the general prevailing rate of per diem wages for holiday and overtime work, for each craft, classification, or type of worker needed to execute the contract. Under existing law, if the director determines during any quarterly period that there has been a change in any prevailing rate of per diem wages in a locality, he or she is required to make that change available to the awarding body and his or her determination is final. Under existing law, that determination does not apply to public works contracts for which the notice to bidders has been published. This bill would instead state that if the director determines, within a semiannual period, that there is a change in any prevailing rate of per diem wages in a locality, that determination applies to any public works contract that is awarded or for which notice to bidders is published on or after January 1, 2014. The bill would authorize any contractor, awarding body, or specified representative affected by a change in rates on a particular contract to, within 20 days, file with the director a verified petition to review the determination of that rate, as specified. The bill would require the director to, upon notice to the interested parties, initiate an investigation or hold a hearing, and, within 20 days after the filing of that petition, except as specified, make a final determination and transmit the determination in writing to the awarding body and to the interested parties. The bill would make that determination issued by the director effective 10 days after its issuance, and until it is modified, rescinded, or superseded by the director. Hide

AB 1165 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend Section 6600 of the Labor Code, Relating to Employment.

Occupational safety and health: violations

Nancy Skinner / This bill was passed by both houses and vetoed by the Governor. It did not become law.

Existing law establishes the Division of Occupational Safety and Health in the Department of Industrial Relations to enforce employment safety laws. Existing law authorizes the division to conduct hearings, inspections, and investigations regarding alleged violations of employment safety laws and to issue a citation or notice to employers. Existing law establishes the Occupational Safety and… More
Existing law establishes the Division of Occupational Safety and Health in the Department of Industrial Relations to enforce employment safety laws. Existing law authorizes the division to conduct hearings, inspections, and investigations regarding alleged violations of employment safety laws and to issue a citation or notice to employers. Existing law establishes the Occupational Safety and Health Appeals Board in the department, and prescribes procedures for the appeals board to hear and decide employer appeals of a citation or notice. This bill would provide that an appeal of a citation or notice, as specified, that is classified and cited as a serious violation, repeat serious violation, willful serious violation, or failure to abate shall not stay abatement dates and requirements. The bill would require the division to stay the abatement for a serious violation, repeat serious violation, willful serious violation, or failure to abate, if it makes a specified determination. The bill would authorize the division to stay an abatement requirement while a motion to stay an abatement is pending. The bill would authorize an employer to request an expedited appeal from the appeals board and would require the appeals board to conduct an expedited hearing in accordance with specified regulations. Hide

AB 12 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend Section 11349.1.5 of the Government Code, Relating to State Government.

State government: Administrative Procedure Act: standardized regulatory impact analyses

Ken Cooley / This bill was passed by both houses and vetoed by the Governor. It did not become law.

The Administrative Procedure Act governs the procedures for the adoption, amendment, or repeal of regulations by state agencies and for the review of those regulatory actions by the Office of Administrative Law. Existing law requires each state agency to prepare a standardized regulatory impact analysis, as specified, with respect to the adoption, amendment, or repeal of a major regulation, as… More
The Administrative Procedure Act governs the procedures for the adoption, amendment, or repeal of regulations by state agencies and for the review of those regulatory actions by the Office of Administrative Law. Existing law requires each state agency to prepare a standardized regulatory impact analysis, as specified, with respect to the adoption, amendment, or repeal of a major regulation, as defined, that is proposed on or after November 1, 2013. Existing law requires the Department of Finance and the office, from time to time, to review the standardized regulatory impact analyses for adherence to regulations adopted by the department. This bill would instead require the Department of Finance and the office to annually review the standardized regulatory impact analyses for adherence to the regulations adopted by the department. Existing law requires, on or before November 1, 2015, the office to submit to the Senate and Assembly Committees on Governmental Organization a report describing the extent to which submitted standardized regulatory impact analyses for proposed major regulations adhere to the regulations adopted by the department. This bill would instead require the office to annually prepare that report for the Senate Committee on Governmental Organization and the Assembly Committee on Accountability and Administrative Review and include recommendations for actions the Legislature might consider for improving state agency performance and compliance in the creation of the standardized regulatory impact analyses. This bill would also require the office to notify the Legislature of noncompliance by a state agency and to post the report and the notice of noncompliance on the office’s Internet Web site. Hide

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AB 1200 (2013-2014) - An Act to Add and Repeal Chapter 7.7 (Commencing with Section 13590) of Division 7 of the Water Code, Relating to Recycled Water.

Recycled water: agricultural irrigation impoundments: pilot project

Marc Levine / This bill was passed by both houses and vetoed by the Governor. It did not become law.

Existing law establishes the State Water Resources Control Board and the California regional water quality control boards as the principal state agencies with authority over matters relating to water quality. This bill would, before October 1, 2014, and until January 1, 2018, permit the San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Board to authorize a voluntary pilot project for the purposes of… More
Existing law establishes the State Water Resources Control Board and the California regional water quality control boards as the principal state agencies with authority over matters relating to water quality. This bill would, before October 1, 2014, and until January 1, 2018, permit the San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Board to authorize a voluntary pilot project for the purposes of investigating potential water quality impacts associated with maximizing the supplementation of agricultural irrigation impoundments with disinfected tertiary treated recycled water, if the regional board finds that the proposed pilot project satisfies specified criteria. This bill would require the pilot project to include a stakeholder advisory group, composed as prescribed, to review and provide input on pilot project design, implementation, and data analysis. This bill would require a prescribed final report to be issued to the San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board and the state board, as specified, and upon review of the final report would authorize the regional board to develop a formula for future waste discharge requirements to be issued for similar purposes and report to the state board and the Legislature with any recommendations, as prescribed. Hide