Find Bills

California Bills: Search Results

Results 1-10 of 1,999 bills

AB 101 (2015-2016) - An Act to Add Section 51226.7 to the Education Code, Relating to Pupil Instruction.

Pupil instruction: ethnic studies

Luis Alejo, Reginald B. Jones-Sawyer, Sr., Rob Bonta / The bill was voted on by a Senate committee on August 27, 2015.

Existing law requires the adopted course of study for grades 7 to 12, inclusive, to include, among other subjects, the social sciences. Existing law requires the State Board of Education, with the assistance of the Superintendent of Public Instruction, to establish a list of textbooks and other instructional materials that highlight the contributions of minorities in the development of California… More
Existing law requires the adopted course of study for grades 7 to 12, inclusive, to include, among other subjects, the social sciences. Existing law requires the State Board of Education, with the assistance of the Superintendent of Public Instruction, to establish a list of textbooks and other instructional materials that highlight the contributions of minorities in the development of California and the United States. This bill would require the Superintendent to oversee the development of, and the state board to adopt, a model curriculum framework and other support systems to ensure quality courses in ethnic studies. The bill would require the Superintendent to establish an Ethnic Studies Advisory Committee and would require the committee to advise, assist, and make recommendations to the state board about programs, curriculum content, and other issues related to ethnic studies. The bill would require the Superintendent, on or before June 30, 2016, to submit to the state board a plan to fully implement these requirements. The bill would, beginning the school year following the adoption of the model curriculum, authorize each school district maintaining any of grades 7 to 12, inclusive, to offer, as an elective course in the social sciences, a course of study in ethnic studies based on the model curriculum framework. Hide

AB 1012 (2015-2016) - An Act to Add Sections 51228.1, 51228.2, and 51228.3 to the Education Code, Relating to Pupil Instruction.

Pupil instruction: course periods without educational content

Reginald B. Jones-Sawyer, Sr. / The bill was voted on by a Senate committee on August 27, 2015.

(1)Existing law establishes a system of public elementary and secondary education in this state, and requires and authorizes local educational agencies to provide specified instruction at elementary and secondary schools. Existing law prescribes various requirements with respect to a course of study for grades 7 to 12, inclusive, at these schools. This bill, commencing with the 2016–17 school… More
(1)Existing law establishes a system of public elementary and secondary education in this state, and requires and authorizes local educational agencies to provide specified instruction at elementary and secondary schools. Existing law prescribes various requirements with respect to a course of study for grades 7 to 12, inclusive, at these schools. This bill, commencing with the 2016–17 school year, would prohibit school districts that maintain any of grades 9 to 12, inclusive, from assigning any pupil enrolled in a school, as defined to exclude alternative schools, community day schools, continuation schools, and opportunity schools, in the school district to any course period without educational content, as defined, for more than one week in any semester, except under prescribed conditions. The bill would specifically prohibit school districts from assigning any pupil enrolled in a school in the school district to a course period without educational content because there are not sufficient curricular course offerings for the pupil to take during the relevant period of the designated schoolday. The bill would, commencing with the 2016–17 school year, also prohibit school districts that maintain any of grades 9 to 12, inclusive, from assigning a pupil to a course that the pupil has previously completed and received a grade determined by the school district to be sufficient to satisfy the requirements and prerequisites for admission to the California public institutions of postsecondary education and the minimum requirements for receiving a diploma of graduation from high school, except under specified conditions. The bill would specify that it is not to be interpreted to limit or otherwise affect the authority of a school district to provide evening high school programs, independent study programs, or work-based learning or work experience education. The bill would specify procedures to be followed if a complaint of noncompliance with the requirements of the bill is filed with a local educational agency or if an appeal of the local educational agency’s decision on the complaint is made to the State Department of Education. The bill would require the Superintendent of Public Instruction to prepare an annual report detailing actions taken pursuant to these procedures. The bill would require the Superintendent to develop regulations for adoption by the State Board of Education governing these provisions. To the extent that this bill would create new duties for local educational agencies, it would constitute a state-mandated local program. (2)The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to these statutory provisions. Hide

AB 1014 (2015-2016) - An Act to Add and Repeal Section 48270 of the Education Code, Relating to Pupils, and Making an Appropriation Therefor.

Pupils: truancy: Our Children’s Success–The Early Intervention Attendance Pilot Grant Program

Tony Thurmond / The bill was voted on by a Senate committee on August 27, 2015.

Existing law requires a pupil subject to compulsory full-time education or to compulsory continuation education who is absent from school without a valid excuse 3 full days in one school year or tardy or absent for more than a 30-minute period during the schoolday without a valid excuse on 3 occasions in one school year, or any combination thereof, to be classified as a truant. Existing law… More
Existing law requires a pupil subject to compulsory full-time education or to compulsory continuation education who is absent from school without a valid excuse 3 full days in one school year or tardy or absent for more than a 30-minute period during the schoolday without a valid excuse on 3 occasions in one school year, or any combination thereof, to be classified as a truant. Existing law requires, upon a pupil’s initial classification as a truant, a school district to notify the pupil’s parent or guardian of specified information using the most cost-effective method possible. This bill would make various findings and declarations regarding truancy. The bill would establish the Our Children’s Success–The Early Intervention Attendance Pilot Grant Program under the administration of the State Department of Education. The program would provide grants to applicant public schools, school districts, and county offices of education seeking to resolve the attendance problems of pupils in kindergarten and grades 1 to 3, inclusive. The bill would provide that the above entities maintaining kindergarten or any of grades 1 to 3, inclusive, could apply for grants under the program. The bill would authorize the applications for grants submitted by the above entities to the department to reflect a plan including specified components. The bill would require the department to give priority in awarding grants to those applicants who demonstrate financial need for the grant and that have the highest truancy rates in urban areas, rural areas, and suburban areas, respectively. The bill would require the grants to be awarded for 3 years and to be used to address attendance problems of pupils in kindergarten and grades 1 to 3, inclusive, pursuant to the plans submitted by the applicant. The bill would provide that each grant awarded be for no more than $500,000 and would require the applicant to provide a 20% match. The bill would require an applicant receiving a grant to submit a report, containing specified data, to the department at the conclusion of the grant. The bill would require the department to submit a report, on or before January 1, 2021, to the respective appropriations committees and education committees of the Assembly and the Senate, and would require this report to include a recommendation on whether the grant program should continue. These provisions would be repealed on January 1, 2022. The bill would appropriate an unspecified sum from an unspecified source to the department for purposes of implementing the bill. Hide

AB 1024 (2015-2016) - An Act to Add Section 11102.6 to the Vehicle Code, Relating to Vehicles.

Driving schools

Beth Gaines / The bill was voted on by a Senate committee on August 27, 2015.

Existing law requires a person who is licensed as a driving school operator by the Department of Motor Vehicles to meet specified requirements, and provides for disciplinary action against those licensees who commit certain acts. Existing law specifies certain requirements that a driving school operator must satisfy, including, among others, passing an examination, within 3 attempts, on traffic… More
Existing law requires a person who is licensed as a driving school operator by the Department of Motor Vehicles to meet specified requirements, and provides for disciplinary action against those licensees who commit certain acts. Existing law specifies certain requirements that a driving school operator must satisfy, including, among others, passing an examination, within 3 attempts, on traffic laws, safe driving practices, the operation of motor vehicles, and other topics. Existing law requires the operator to have worked as a driving instructor for a specified number of hours, as provided. This bill would require driving school operators who are first licensed on or after July 1, 2016, and who offer no behind-the-wheel driver training, to successfully complete a 60-hour educational program acceptable to the department with specified content, including operator responsibilities and current laws, instead of meeting the requirement of having worked as a driving instructor for a specified number of hours. Hide

AB 1032 (2015-2016) - An Act to Amend Sections 60501 and 60505.5 of the Revenue and Taxation Code, Relating to Taxation.

Diesel Fuel Tax Law: reimbursements

Rudy Salas / The bill was voted on by a Senate committee on August 27, 2015.

The Diesel Fuel Tax Law imposes a tax upon the removal, entry, sale, delivery, or specified use of diesel fuel, at a specified rate per gallon. That law provides for a reimbursement of the amount of that tax to persons who have used that tax-paid fuel in specified nontaxable uses, which is allowed through a claim for refund. This bill would allow a claim for refund for amounts of tax paid on the… More
The Diesel Fuel Tax Law imposes a tax upon the removal, entry, sale, delivery, or specified use of diesel fuel, at a specified rate per gallon. That law provides for a reimbursement of the amount of that tax to persons who have used that tax-paid fuel in specified nontaxable uses, which is allowed through a claim for refund. This bill would allow a claim for refund for amounts of tax paid on the biodiesel fuel portion of dyed blended biodiesel fuel removed from an approved terminal at the terminal rack, as provided, to the extent a supplier can show that the tax on that biodiesel fuel has been paid by the same supplier. Hide

AB 1043 (2015-2016) - An Act to Amend Section 164.12 of the Streets and Highways Code, Relating to State Highways.

Highways: State Highway Route 43

Rudy Salas / The bill was voted on by a Senate committee on August 27, 2015.

Existing law requires certain transportation funds made available for transportation capital improvement projects to be programmed and expended in specified amounts for interregional improvements and regional improvements. Existing law specifies the state highway routes that are included in the interregional road system and the state highway routes that are eligible interregional and intercounty… More
Existing law requires certain transportation funds made available for transportation capital improvement projects to be programmed and expended in specified amounts for interregional improvements and regional improvements. Existing law specifies the state highway routes that are included in the interregional road system and the state highway routes that are eligible interregional and intercounty routes. This bill would include State Highway Route 43 as an eligible interregional and intercounty route. Hide

AB 1045 (2015-2016) - An Act to Add Sections 42649.87 and 43032 to the Public Resources Code, Relating to Solid Waste.

Organic waste: composting

Jacqui Irwin / The bill was voted on by a Senate committee on August 27, 2015.

(1)The existing California Integrated Waste Management Act of 1989, which is administered by the Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery, establishes an integrated waste management program. Existing law requires each city, county, city and county, and regional agency, if any, to develop a source reduction and recycling element of an integrated waste management plan. Those entities are… More
(1)The existing California Integrated Waste Management Act of 1989, which is administered by the Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery, establishes an integrated waste management program. Existing law requires each city, county, city and county, and regional agency, if any, to develop a source reduction and recycling element of an integrated waste management plan. Those entities are required to divert 50% of all solid waste through source reduction, recycling, and composting. This bill would require the California Environmental Protection Agency, in coordination with the department, the State Water Resources Control Board, the State Air Resources Board, and the Department of Food and Agriculture, to develop and implement policies to aid in diverting organic waste from landfills by promoting the composting of specified organic waste and by promoting the appropriate use of that compost throughout the state. The bill would require the agency to promote a goal of reducing at least 5 million metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions per year through the development and application of compost on working lands, and would require the agency to work with the Department of Food and Agriculture to achieve this goal. The bill would also require the agency to convene an Organic Waste Recycling Group, consisting of representatives of the department, the State Water Resources Control Board, the State Air Resources Board, and the Department of Food and Agriculture, to ensure proper coordination of agency regulations and goals to implement these requirements, and to perform other specified functions. (2)Existing law requires the Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery to adopt regulations relating to waste management, including standards for the design, operation, maintenance, and ultimate reuse of solid waste facilities, and for solid waste handling, transfer, composting, transformation, and disposal. Existing law prohibits the solid waste handling, transfer, composting, transformation, and disposal standards from including any requirement that is under the authority of the State Air Resources Board for the prevention of air pollution or the State Water Resources Control Board for the prevention of water pollution and prohibits the solid waste facilities standards from including aspects of solid waste handling and disposal that are within the jurisdiction of the State Air Resources Board, air pollution control districts, and air quality management districts, or the State Water Resources Control Board or a regional water district. Existing law prohibits a person from discharging a quantity of air contaminants or other material that causes injury, detriment, nuisance, or annoyance to the public, or that endangers the comfort, repose, health, or safety of the public, or that causes injury or damage to business or property, except as provided. Under existing law, the Porter-Cologne Water Quality Control Act, the State Water Resources Control Board and the California regional water quality control boards are the principal state agencies with responsibility for the coordination and control of water quality in the state. The act, with certain exceptions, requires a waste discharger to file certain information with the appropriate regional board and to pay an annual fee. This bill would require the Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery, in coordination with the State Air Resources Board and the State Water Resources Control Board, to develop a policy that promotes the development of coordinated permitting and regulation of composting facilities while protecting the environment. Hide

AB 1056 (2015-2016) - An Act to Amend Sections 97013 and 97015 of the Government Code, and to Add Article 5 (Commencing with Section 6046) to Chapter 5 of Title 7 of Part 3 of the Penal Code, Relating to Recidivism Reduction, and Making an Appropriation Therefor.

Second Chance Program

Toni Atkins / The bill was voted on by a Senate committee on August 27, 2015.

(1)Existing law, until January 1, 2020, establishes the Social Innovation Financing Program, and requires the Board of State and Community Corrections to administer the program. Existing law, among other things, authorizes the board, upon appropriation of funds by the Legislature for deposit into the Recidivism Reduction Fund, to award grants in amounts of not less than $500,000 and not more than… More
(1)Existing law, until January 1, 2020, establishes the Social Innovation Financing Program, and requires the Board of State and Community Corrections to administer the program. Existing law, among other things, authorizes the board, upon appropriation of funds by the Legislature for deposit into the Recidivism Reduction Fund, to award grants in amounts of not less than $500,000 and not more than $2,000,000 to each of 3 counties, selected as specified, for the purpose of entering into a pay for success or social innovation financing contract, pursuant to which private investors agree to provide financing to service providers to achieve social outcomes agreed upon in advance and the government agency that is a party to the contractual agreement agrees to pay a return on the investment to the investors if successful programmatic outcomes are achieved by the service provider. Existing law limits the total amount of the grants awarded to $5,000,000. Existing law requires each county receiving an award to report annually to the Governor and Legislature on the status of its program. Existing law requires the board to compile the county reports and submit a summary report to the Governor and the Legislature annually.This bill would extend the operation of that program and the reporting requirements until January 1, 2022.This bill would also require the board to administer a competitive grant program that focuses on community-based solutions for reducing recidivism. The bill would establish minimum criteria for the grant program and would require the board to establish an executive steering committee, as specified, to make recommendations regarding the design, efficacy, and viability of proposals and to make recommendations on guidelines for the submission of proposals for the grant program, including threshold or scoring criteria, or both. Among other things, the bill would require those guidelines to prioritize proposals that advance principles of restorative justice while demonstrating a capacity to reduce recidivism, and that leverage certain other federal, state, and local funds or social investments. The bill would define recidivism, for the purposes of these provisions, as a conviction of a new felony or misdemeanor committed within 3 years of release from custody or committed within 3 years of placement on supervision for a previous criminal conviction. (2)The Safe Neighborhoods and Schools Act establishes within the State Treasury the Safe Neighborhoods and Schools Fund to receive moneys transferred from the General Fund in an amount equal to the savings resulting from the implementation of the act, as specified. The act requires that 65% of the moneys in the Safe Neighborhoods and Schools Fund be allocated the Board of State and Community Corrections to administer a grant program to public agencies aimed at supporting specified types of programs, including diversion programs, for people in the criminal justice system with an emphasis on programs that reduce recidivism, as specified. This bill would create the Second Chance Fund in the State Treasury for the purpose of funding the above-described recidivism reduction program. The bill would require the Controller, upon order of the Director of Finance, to transfer the moneys available to the Board of State and Community Corrections from the Safe Neighborhoods and Schools Fund into the Second Chance Fund. The bill would also authorize the Second Chance Fund to receive moneys from any other federal, state, or local grant, or from any private donation. The bill would prohibit the board from using the moneys in the fund to supplant existing programs and from spending more than 5% per year of the total moneys in the fund for administrative purposes. The bill would require the board to administer these provisions, and moneys in the fund would be continuously appropriated to the board for expenditure for these purposes. By creating a continuously appropriated fund, this bill would make an appropriation. (3)The Safe Neighborhoods and Schools Act provides that its provisions may be amended by a statute, passed by a 23 vote of each house of the Legislature and signed by the Governor, that is consistent with and furthers the intent of the act. This bill would declare that its provisions further the intent of the Safe Neighborhoods and Schools Act. Hide

AB 1058 (2015-2016) - An Act to Amend Section 44691 of the Education Code, Relating to Pupil Safety.

Pupil safety: child abuse prevention: training

Catharine B. Baker / The bill was voted on by a Senate committee on August 27, 2015.

Existing law requires the State Department of Education, in consultation with the Office of Child Abuse Prevention in the State Department of Social Services, to take certain actions relating to the detection and reporting of child abuse, including, among other things, developing and disseminating information to local educational agencies, as specified, and state special schools and diagnostic… More
Existing law requires the State Department of Education, in consultation with the Office of Child Abuse Prevention in the State Department of Social Services, to take certain actions relating to the detection and reporting of child abuse, including, among other things, developing and disseminating information to local educational agencies, as specified, and state special schools and diagnostic centers regarding the detection and reporting of child abuse. This bill would require the State Department of Education to establish guidelines and best practices regarding child abuse prevention, and to post on its Internet Web site links to existing training resources. The bill would encourage local educational agencies, as specified, and state special schools and diagnostic centers to participate in child abuse prevention training and also encourage them to provide school employees with training in child abuse prevention at least once every 3 years. Hide

AB 1060 (2015-2016) - An Act to Add and Repeal Chapter 2 (Commencing with Section 101990) to Part 6 of Division 101 of the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Cancer.

Cancer clinical trials

Susan Bonilla / The bill was voted on by a Senate committee on August 27, 2015.

Existing law establishes the scope and function of the California Health and Human Services Agency, which includes departments charged with administering laws pertaining to public health and social services, among other things. Existing law also establishes the Inclusion of Women and Minorities in Clinical Research Act, which is designed to promote the inclusion of women and minority groups in… More
Existing law establishes the scope and function of the California Health and Human Services Agency, which includes departments charged with administering laws pertaining to public health and social services, among other things. Existing law also establishes the Inclusion of Women and Minorities in Clinical Research Act, which is designed to promote the inclusion of women and minority groups in clinical research, including clinical trials. This bill, until January 1, 2022, would establish the Cancer Clinical Trials Foundation in the Health and Human Services Agency, to be governed by a board of trustees. Members of the board would be appointed as specified. The bill would also create the Cancer Clinical Trials Fund, to be used to administer a grant program. The bill would limit the amount the agency may spend to establish the foundation to $300,000 of appropriated funds, to be repaid by January 1, 2021, but would otherwise prohibit General Fund moneys from being used for the foundation. The bill would authorize the board to solicit and receive money, as specified, and would authorize the agency to apply for federal funds for this purpose. The bill would require the board, upon contribution of at least $500,000 to the fund, to establish the Cancer Clinical Trials Grant Program, in order to increase patient access to cancer clinical trials in specified populations. The bill would require that grant money be used for designated purposes, and would also require grant recipients to report to the board. The bill would require the board to report to the Legislature, as specified. This bill would make related findings. Hide