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Results 1-10 of 869 bills

AB 1423 (2015-2016) - An Act to Add Section 2604 to the Penal Code, Relating to Medical Treatment of Prisoners.

Prisoners: medical treatment

Mark Stone / The bill was voted on by the Senate on September 2, 2015.

Existing law provides for the designation and selection of health care surrogates, and for the manner of making health care decisions for patients without surrogates. Existing law prohibits the administration of psychiatric medication to an inmate in state prison on a nonemergency basis without the inmate’s informed consent, unless certain conditions are satisfied, including, among other… More
Existing law provides for the designation and selection of health care surrogates, and for the manner of making health care decisions for patients without surrogates. Existing law prohibits the administration of psychiatric medication to an inmate in state prison on a nonemergency basis without the inmate’s informed consent, unless certain conditions are satisfied, including, among other things, that a psychiatrist determines that the inmate is gravely disabled and does not have the capacity to refuse treatment with psychiatric medication. Existing law authorizes a physician to administer psychiatric medication to a prison inmate in specified emergency situations. This bill would, except as provided, establish a process for a licensed physician or dentist to file a petition with the Office of Administrative Hearings to request that an administrative law judge make a determination as to a patient’s capacity to give informed consent or make a health care decision, and request appointment of a surrogate decisionmaker, if the patient is an adult housed in state prison, the physician or dentist is unable to obtain informed consent from the inmate patient because the physician or dentist determines that the inmate patient appears to lack capacity to provide informed consent or make a health care decision, and there is no person with legal authority to provide informed consent for, or make decisions concerning the health care of, the inmate patient. The bill would require the petition to contain specified information, including, among other things, the inmate patient’s current physical condition and a description of the health care conditions currently afflicting the inmate patient. This bill would require that the petition be served on the inmate patient and his or her counsel, and filed with the office, as provided. The bill would also require that the inmate patient be provided with counsel and a written notice advising him or her of, among other things, the inmate patient’s right to be present at the hearing. Except as specified, the bill would require that the inmate patient be provided with a hearing before an administrative law judge within 30 days of the date of filing the petition. In case of an emergency, as defined, the bill would authorize the inmate patient’s physician or dentist to administer a medical intervention that requires informed consent prior to the date of the administrative hearing and would require that counsel for the inmate patient be notified by the physician or dentist. The bill would require the administrative law judge to determine and provide a written order and findings setting forth whether there has been clear and convincing evidence that, among other things, the inmate patient lacks capacity to give informed consent or make a health care decision. If the findings required by these provisions are made, the bill would require the administrative law judge to appoint a surrogate decisionmaker for health care for the inmate patient, as provided, which would be valid for one year and would be valid at any state correctional facility within California. The bill would also provide for a process to renew the appointment of the surrogate decisionmaker. The bill would authorize the Secretary of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation to adopt regulations as necessary to carry out these provisions. Hide

ACR 56 (2015-2016) - Relative to the Official State Pet.

Official State Pet

Eric Linder / The bill was voted on by the Senate on September 2, 2015.

This measure would declare a shelter pet as the official State Pet.

AB 1310 (2015-2016) - An Act to Amend Sections 786 and 1524.3 of the Penal Code, Relating to Disorderly Conduct.

Disorderly conduct: unlawful distribution of image

Mike Gatto / The bill was voted on by the Senate on September 2, 2015.

Existing law makes it a misdemeanor to look through a hole or opening, into, or to view, by means of any instrumentality, the interior of an area in which an occupant has a reasonable expectation of privacy with the intent to invade the privacy of that person. Existing law makes it a misdemeanor to record another person under or through the clothing worn by that person, without the consent or… More
Existing law makes it a misdemeanor to look through a hole or opening, into, or to view, by means of any instrumentality, the interior of an area in which an occupant has a reasonable expectation of privacy with the intent to invade the privacy of that person. Existing law makes it a misdemeanor to record another person under or through the clothing worn by that person, without the consent or knowledge of the person, under circumstances in which the person has a reasonable expectation of privacy. Existing law makes it a misdemeanor to secretly record another person in a state of full or partial undress without the consent or knowledge of that person, in an area in which that person has a reasonable expectation of privacy. Existing law makes it a misdemeanor to intentionally distribute an image of the intimate body part or parts of another person, or an image of the person depicted engaging in specified sexual acts, under circumstances in which the persons agree or understand that the image remain private, the person distributing the image knows or should know that distribution of the image will cause serious emotional distress, and the person depicted suffers that distress. Existing law establishes the proper jurisdictions of a criminal action for unauthorized use, retention, or transfer of personal identifying information to include the county where the theft occurred, the county in which the victim resided at the time of the offense, or the county where the information was used for an illegal purpose. This bill would apply those jurisdictional provisions to the misdemeanors described above. Existing law details procedures for a governmental entity to gather specified records from a provider of electronic communication service or a remote computing service by search warrant. Existing law specifies that no notice is required to be given to a subscriber or customer by a governmental entity receiving records pursuant to these procedures. This bill would additionally authorize a governmental entity to use those procedures to gather the contents of communications between the subscriber and the service provider. The bill would require a search warrant used under those procedures to be limited to only that information necessary to achieve the objective of the warrant, as specified. The bill would require information obtained through the execution of a search warrant pursuant that is unrelated to the objective of the warrant to be sealed and not be subject to further review without an order from the court. The bill would require the governmental entity to provide a specified notice to the customer or subscriber upon receipt of the requested records. The bill would authorize a delay of that notice in 90-day increments if there is reason to believe notification would may have an adverse effect, as defined. Hide

AB 852 (2015-2016) - An Act to Add Section 1720.7 to the Labor Code, Relating to Public Works.

Public works: prevailing wages

Autumn R. Burke / The bill was voted on by the Senate on September 2, 2015.

Existing law defines “public works,” for the purposes of regulating public works contracts, as, among other things, construction, alteration, demolition, installation, or repair work done under contract and paid for, in whole or in part, out of public funds. Existing law further requires that, except as specified, not less than the general prevailing rate of per diem wages be paid to workers… More
Existing law defines “public works,” for the purposes of regulating public works contracts, as, among other things, construction, alteration, demolition, installation, or repair work done under contract and paid for, in whole or in part, out of public funds. Existing law further requires that, except as specified, not less than the general prevailing rate of per diem wages be paid to workers employed on public works and imposes misdemeanor penalties for a willful violation of this requirement. This bill would expand the definition of “public works,” for the purposes of provisions relating to the prevailing rate of per diem wages, to also include any construction, alteration, demolition, installation, or repair work done under private contract on a project for a general acute care hospital, except on a project for a rural general acute care hospital with a maximum of 76 beds, when the project is paid for, in whole or in part, with the proceeds of conduit revenue bonds, as defined, that were issued on or after January 1, 2016. Because the willful violation of prevailing wage requirements when engaged in these public works projects would result in the imposition of misdemeanor penalties, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide

AB 80 (2015-2016) - An Act to Add and Repeal Chapter 3.4 (Commencing with Section 8265) to Division 1 of Title 2 of the Government Code, Relating to State Government.

Interagency Task Force on the Status of Boys and Men of Color

Nora Campos, Luis Alejo, Rob Bonta, Reginald B. Jones-Sawyer, Sr., Das Williams / The bill was voted on by the Senate on September 2, 2015.

The California Constitution prohibits a person from being deprived of life, liberty, or property without due process of law, or from being denied equal protection of the laws. The United States Constitution prohibits a state from denying to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws. Existing law establishes various advisory boards and commissions in state government with… More
The California Constitution prohibits a person from being deprived of life, liberty, or property without due process of law, or from being denied equal protection of the laws. The United States Constitution prohibits a state from denying to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws. Existing law establishes various advisory boards and commissions in state government with specified duties and responsibilities. The federal My Brother’s Keeper Initiative, launched by the President of the United States in February 2014, required the establishment of the My Brother’s Keeper Task Force, an interagency effort to improve the expected educational and life outcomes for and address the persistent opportunity gaps faced by boys and young men of color in the United States. This bill would establish until January 1, 2026, the Interagency Task Force on the Status of Boys and Men of Color, a multiagency advisory body that would serve as a support mechanism for department agency and systems leaders by taking coordinated action in meeting the myriad of challenges facing boys and men of color in California, and assisting the respective departments and agencies in more successfully improving life outcomes for this population. The membership of the task force would include members of the Legislature, as well as representatives of specified agencies, departments, and private entities. The bill would set forth the initial and ongoing responsibilities of the task force, including, among others, an assessment of state program alignment with the objectives of the My Brother’s Keeper program and the Assembly Select Committee on the Status of Boys and Men of Color in California, and the development of strategies to enhance positive outcomes and eliminate or mitigate negative outcomes for boys and men of color in the state. The bill would establish the Boys and Men of Color Task Force Fund, to carry out the bill’s requirements in support of the task force, upon appropriation by the Legislature. The bill would authorize the task force to accept federal funds, gifts, donations, grants, or bequests for all or any of its purposes. Hide

AB 1431 (2015-2016) - An Act to Amend Section 20919.15 Of, and to Add and Repeal Article 60.4 (Commencing with Section 20919.20) of Chapter 1 of Part 3 of Division 2 Of, the Public Contract Code, Relating to Local Public Contracting.

Local Agency Public Construction Act: job order contracting

Jimmy Gomez / The bill was voted on by the Senate on September 2, 2015.

Existing law, the Local Agency Public Construction Act, authorizes job order contracting, as provided, by the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD), until December 31, 2020. This bill would repeal the provisions relating to the LAUSD and would instead authorize job order contracting in a similar manner for school districts until January 1, 2022. The bill would restrict job order contracting… More
Existing law, the Local Agency Public Construction Act, authorizes job order contracting, as provided, by the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD), until December 31, 2020. This bill would repeal the provisions relating to the LAUSD and would instead authorize job order contracting in a similar manner for school districts until January 1, 2022. The bill would restrict job order contracting pursuant to the bill to school districts that have entered into a project labor agreement or agreements, as defined, that will apply to all public works in excess of $25,000 undertaken by the school district through at least December 31, 2021, regardless of what contracting procedure is used to award that work. The bill would require job order contractors to submit a questionnaire to the school district containing specified information verified under oath. By expanding the crime of perjury, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide

AB 189 (2015-2016) - An Act to Add Chapter 9.2 (Commencing with Section 8758) to Division 1 of Title 2 of the Government Code, Relating to State Government.

Arts Council: cultural districts

Richard Bloom / The bill was voted on by the Senate on September 2, 2015.

The Dixon-Zenovich-Maddy California Arts Act of 1975 establishes the Arts Council, consisting of 11 appointed members, sets forth the duties of the council, and authorizes the council to accept federal grants and unrestricted gifts, donations, bequests, or grants of funds from private sources and public agencies for the purposes of encouraging artistic awareness, promoting the employment of… More
The Dixon-Zenovich-Maddy California Arts Act of 1975 establishes the Arts Council, consisting of 11 appointed members, sets forth the duties of the council, and authorizes the council to accept federal grants and unrestricted gifts, donations, bequests, or grants of funds from private sources and public agencies for the purposes of encouraging artistic awareness, promoting the employment of artists, and providing for the exhibition of art works in public buildings, among others. This bill would additionally require the Arts Council to establish criteria and guidelines for state-designated cultural districts, as defined. The bill would require the council to establish a competitive application system for certification, provide technical and promotional support for certified state-designated cultural districts, and collaborate with public agencies and private entities to maximize the benefits of state-designated cultural districts. The bill would provide that a geographical area within the state may be certified as a state-designated cultural district by applying to the council for certification, as provided. The bill would also provide that certification as a state-designated cultural district is effective for 5 years, after which the district may renew certification every 3 years. This bill would authorize the council to solicit and receive gifts, donations, bequests, grants of funds, or any other revenues, from public or private sources and to expend those moneys, upon appropriation by the Legislature, for a state-designated cultural district program and for any other purpose it deems necessary to implement these provisions. Hide

SCR 78 (2015-2016) - Relative to Veterans.

Veterans: Team AMVETS

Jim Nielsen, Ben Hueso / The bill was voted on by the Senate on September 2, 2015.

This measure would commend AMVETS Department of California, also known as Team AMVETS, for providing benefits and services to veterans, and for playing an important role in the community for 70 years.

SCR 50 (2015-2016) - Relative to World War II Remembrance Month.

World War II Remembrance Month

Jim Nielsen / The bill was voted on by the Senate on September 2, 2015.

This measure would urge the Governor to proclaim the month of June 2015 as World War II Remembrance Month, and call upon all Californians to observe the 70th anniversary of the end of the war.

SR 48 (2015-2016) - Relative to Massage Therapy Awareness Week.

Tony Mendoza, Jerry Hill / The bill was voted on by the Senate on September 2, 2015.

Senate resolutions do not have summaries.