California Bills: Search Results

Results 11-20 of 14,970 bills

AB 1509 (2013-2014) - An Act to Add Section 90 to the Military and Veterans Code, Relating to Veterans.

Veterans: transition assistance

Steve Fox / The bill was voted on by the Senate on August 21, 2014.

Existing law establishes the Department of Veterans Affairs, which is responsible for administering various programs and services for the benefit of veterans. This bill would require, by July 1, 2015, the Department of Veterans Affairs to develop a transition assistance program for veterans who have been discharged from the Armed Forces of the United States or the National Guard of any state, as… More
Existing law establishes the Department of Veterans Affairs, which is responsible for administering various programs and services for the benefit of veterans. This bill would require, by July 1, 2015, the Department of Veterans Affairs to develop a transition assistance program for veterans who have been discharged from the Armed Forces of the United States or the National Guard of any state, as specified. The bill would require the program to include certain California-specific transition assistance information. Hide

AB 2454 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend Sections 388.1 and 11403 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, Relating to Public Social Services.

Foster youth: nonminor dependents

Sharon Quirk-Silva / The bill was voted on by the Senate on August 21, 2014.

Existing law provides aid and services to children placed in out-of-home care through various public assistance programs, including Aid to Families with Dependent Children-Foster Care (AFDC-FC), Kinship Guardianship Assistance Payment Program (Kin-GAP), and the Adoption Assistance Program. Existing law provides that a minor who has been abused or neglected, or who has violated a law or ordinance,… More
Existing law provides aid and services to children placed in out-of-home care through various public assistance programs, including Aid to Families with Dependent Children-Foster Care (AFDC-FC), Kinship Guardianship Assistance Payment Program (Kin-GAP), and the Adoption Assistance Program. Existing law provides that a minor who has been abused or neglected, or who has violated a law or ordinance, as specified, is within the jurisdiction of the juvenile court as a dependent child or a ward, respectively. Existing law also establishes the court’s transition jurisdiction over certain minors and nonminors, as specified. Existing law authorizes a nonminor who has not attained 21 years of age to petition the juvenile court for a hearing to determine whether to assume dependency jurisdiction over the nonminor if he or she received public assistance after attaining 18 years of age, as specified, and the nonminor’s former guardian or guardians or adoptive parent or parents died after he or she attained 18 years of age, but before he or she attains 21 years of age. Prior to the hearing, existing law requires the court to order the county child welfare or probation department to prepare a report for the court that addresses the nonminor’s educational or vocational plans, as specified, and recommendations for his or her placement. Existing law requires the placement and care of a former dependent or ward to be under the responsibility of specified local agencies, including either the county welfare services department or probation department, and requires the agency made responsible for the nonminor’s placement and care to prepare a new transitional independent living case plan, as specified. This bill would additionally authorize a nonminor who has not attained 21 years of age to petition the court, as described above, if the nonminor received public assistance after attaining 18 years of age, as specified, and his or her former guardian or guardians or adoptive parent or parents no longer provide ongoing support to, and no longer receive payment on behalf of, the nonminor, and the court determines that it is in the nonminor’s best interest for the court to assume dependency jurisdiction. By expanding the number of persons who are eligible to petition the juvenile court to assume dependency jurisdiction, the bill would increase the duties of social workers and probation officers, thereby creating a state-mandated local program. This bill would make technical and conforming changes to a related provision. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to these statutory provisions. Hide

AB 2558 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend Sections 87150 and 87151 Of, and to Repeal and Add Section 87152 Of, the Education Code, Relating to Community Colleges.

Community colleges: faculty and staff development

Das Williams / The bill was voted on by the Senate on August 21, 2014.

Existing law establishes the Community College Faculty and Staff Development Fund, to be administered by the Board of Governors of the California Community Colleges, for purposes of providing state general funds to community colleges for supporting locally developed and implemented faculty and staff development programs. Existing law requires the board of governors to annually allocate funds… More
Existing law establishes the Community College Faculty and Staff Development Fund, to be administered by the Board of Governors of the California Community Colleges, for purposes of providing state general funds to community colleges for supporting locally developed and implemented faculty and staff development programs. Existing law requires the board of governors to annually allocate funds appropriated for these purposes to each community college district whose chief executive officer has submitted to the Chancellor of the California Community Colleges an affidavit that includes specified information. Existing law limits the allocation a community college district can receive from the Community College Faculty and Staff Development Fund to a maximum of 2% of the community college district’s fiscal year revenues for the prior fiscal year. This bill would eliminate the Community College Faculty and Staff Development Fund and instead establish the Community College Professional Development Program. The bill would require any funding appropriated for this program to be allocated, in accordance with rules and regulations adopted by the board of governors, to community college districts that provide professional development opportunities for both faculty and staff. The bill would require community college districts receiving this funding to include the employee’s time used participating in the Community College Professional Development Program in the employee’s contractually obligated hours. The bill would also make nonsubstantive changes to these provisions. Hide

AB 1650 (2013-2014) - An Act to Add Section 10186 to the Public Contract Code, Relating to Public Contracts.

Public contracts: bidders: employment practices

Reggie Jones-Sawyer / The bill was voted on by the Senate on August 21, 2014.

The State Contract Act governs contracting between state agencies and private contractors, and sets forth requirements for the bidding, awarding, and overseeing, of contracts for projects. The act defines a project to include the construction or other improvement to a state structure, building, road, or other state improvement of any kind, that will exceed a total cost limit of $250,000 for the… More
The State Contract Act governs contracting between state agencies and private contractors, and sets forth requirements for the bidding, awarding, and overseeing, of contracts for projects. The act defines a project to include the construction or other improvement to a state structure, building, road, or other state improvement of any kind, that will exceed a total cost limit of $250,000 for the 2010 calendar year, as adjusted every 2 years. Existing regulatory law generally prohibits employers from asking an applicant for employment to disclose information concerning convictions that have been sealed, expunged, or statutorily eradicated, and certain marijuana-related convictions if the convictions are more than 2 years old. Existing law, commencing July 1, 2014, prohibits a state or local agency from asking an applicant to disclose information regarding a criminal conviction, except as specified, until the agency has determined the applicant meets the minimum employment qualifications for the position. This bill would enact the Fair Chance Employment Act, which would require any person submitting a bid for a state contract involving onsite construction-related services to certify that they will not ask an applicant for onsite construction-related employment to disclose information concerning his or her conviction history on or at the time of an initial employment application. The bill would not apply to a position for which a person or state agency is otherwise required by state or federal law to conduct a conviction or criminal history background check or to any contract position with a criminal justice agency, as specified. This bill would not apply to a person to the extent that he or she obtains workers from a hiring hall pursuant to a bona fide collective bargaining agreement. Hide

AB 2052 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend Sections 3212.1, 3212.5, 3212.6, 3212.85, and 3212.9 Of, and to Repeal and Add Section 3212 Of, the Labor Code, Relating to Workers’ Compensation.

Workers’ compensation

Lorena Gonzalez / The bill was voted on by the Senate on August 21, 2014.

Existing law establishes a workers’ compensation system to compensate an employee for injuries arising out of, and in the course of, his or her employment. Existing law designates illnesses and conditions that constitute a compensable injury for various employees, such as California Highway Patrol members, firefighters, and certain peace officers. These injuries include, but are not limited to,… More
Existing law establishes a workers’ compensation system to compensate an employee for injuries arising out of, and in the course of, his or her employment. Existing law designates illnesses and conditions that constitute a compensable injury for various employees, such as California Highway Patrol members, firefighters, and certain peace officers. These injuries include, but are not limited to, hernia, pneumonia, heart trouble, cancer, meningitis, and exposure to a biochemical substances, when the illness or condition develops or manifests itself during a period when the officer or employee is in service of his or her employer, as specified. This bill would expand the coverage of the above provisions relating to compensable injury, to include other, full-time peace officers described pursuant to specified provisions of law. Hide

AB 2321 (2013-2014) - An Act to Add Section 5156.5 to the Vehicle Code, Relating to Vehicles.

Specialized license plates: domestic violence, sexual assault, and sex trafficking awareness

Jimmy Gomez / The bill was voted on by the Senate on August 21, 2014.

Existing law authorizes the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) to issue specialty license plates, including environmental license plates and specified special environmental design license plates. Under existing law, a state agency is authorized to apply to the DMV to sponsor a specialized license plate program, and the DMV is required to issue those license plates if the agency meets certain… More
Existing law authorizes the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) to issue specialty license plates, including environmental license plates and specified special environmental design license plates. Under existing law, a state agency is authorized to apply to the DMV to sponsor a specialized license plate program, and the DMV is required to issue those license plates if the agency meets certain requirements. The DMV is required to charge specified fees for certain services related to the issuance of those plates. Existing law establishes a Family Violence Prevention Program within the Office of Emergency Services to provide financial and technical assistance to local domestic and family violence centers in implementing family violence prevention programs.This bill would require the Office of Emergency Services to apply to the DMV to sponsor a domestic violence and sexual assault awareness license plate program. The bill would establish the California Domestic Violence Prevention Fund in the State Treasury for the deposit of the revenue derived from these license plates, and would require that these funds be allocated, upon appropriation by the Legislature, to the Office of Emergency Services for purposes of funding the Family Violence Prevention Program. Hide

AB 1249 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend Section 10541 Of, and to Add Sections 10544.5 and 10545 To, the Water Code, Relating to Water Quality.

Integrated regional water management plans: nitrate, arsenic, perchlorate, or hexavalent chromium co

Rudy Salas / The bill was voted on by the Senate on August 21, 2014.

Existing law, the Safe Drinking Water, Water Quality and Supply, Flood Control, River and Coastal Protection Bond Act of 2006, an initiative bond act approved by the voters as Proposition 84 at the November 7, 2006, statewide general election, authorized the issuance of bonds in the amount of $5,388,000,000 for the purposes of financing a safe drinking water, water quality and supply, flood… More
Existing law, the Safe Drinking Water, Water Quality and Supply, Flood Control, River and Coastal Protection Bond Act of 2006, an initiative bond act approved by the voters as Proposition 84 at the November 7, 2006, statewide general election, authorized the issuance of bonds in the amount of $5,388,000,000 for the purposes of financing a safe drinking water, water quality and supply, flood control, and resource protection program. Existing law, with regard to those bond funds, makes available to the Department of Water Resources, $1,000,000,000 for grants for projects that assist local public agencies to meet the long term water needs of the state including the delivery of safe drinking water and the protection of water quality and the environment. The act requires that eligible projects implement integrated regional water management plans that meet specified criteria and requires the department to give preference to certain proposals. Existing law, the Integrated Regional Water Management Planning Act, authorizes a regional water management group, as defined, to prepare and adopt an integrated regional water management plan. The act requires the Department of Water Resources to develop and adopt guidelines for the preparation of integrated regional water management plans used to apply for the above-described Proposition 84 funds. This bill would make the guidelines applicable to all funds that are or may become available for integrated regional water management plan implementation. If an area within the boundaries of an integrated regional water management plan has nitrate, arsenic, perchlorate, or hexavalent chromium contamination, the bill would require that the plan include a description of (1) the location and extent of that contamination in the region, (2) the impacts caused by the contamination to communities within the region, (3) existing efforts being undertaken in the region to address the impacts, and (4) any additional efforts needed to address the impacts. If a grant application includes areas that have nitrate, arsenic, perchlorate, or hexavalent chromium contamination, the bill would require the regional water management group include in the grant application information regarding how a project or projects in the application helps to address the contamination or an explanation why the application does not include such a project or projects. For grant applications that include areas that have nitrate, arsenic, perchlorate, or hexavalent chromium contamination, the bill would require the department to consider whether the regional water management group has included projects that help address the impacts caused by the contamination, including projects that provide safe drinking water to small disadvantaged communities. Hide

AB 1993 (2013-2014) - An Act to Add Section 32283.5 to the Education Code, Relating to Pupils.

Pupils: bullying

Steve Fox / The bill was voted on by the Senate on August 21, 2014.

Existing law, the Interagency School Safety Demonstration Act of 1985, among other things, requires the Department of Justice and the State Department of Education to contract with one or more professional trainers to coordinate statewide workshops for school districts, county offices of education, and schoolsite personnel, and in particular school principals, to assist them in the development of… More
Existing law, the Interagency School Safety Demonstration Act of 1985, among other things, requires the Department of Justice and the State Department of Education to contract with one or more professional trainers to coordinate statewide workshops for school districts, county offices of education, and schoolsite personnel, and in particular school principals, to assist them in the development of their respective school safety and crisis response plans, and provide training in the prevention of bullying, as defined.This bill would require the department to develop an online training module to assist all school staff, school administrators, parents, pupils, and community members in increasing their knowledge of the dynamics of bullying and cyberbullying, as specified. Hide

AB 1789 (2013-2014) - An Act to Add Section 12838 to the Food and Agricultural Code, Relating to Pesticides.

Pesticides: neonicotinoids: reevaluation: determination: control measures

Das Williams / The bill was voted on by the Senate on August 21, 2014.

Existing law requires pesticides to be registered by the Department of Pesticide Regulation. Existing law requires that a pesticide be thoroughly evaluated prior to registration, and provides for the continued evaluation of registered pesticides. A violation of a regulation adopted by the department pursuant to this authority is a crime. This bill would require the department, by July 1, 2018,… More
Existing law requires pesticides to be registered by the Department of Pesticide Regulation. Existing law requires that a pesticide be thoroughly evaluated prior to registration, and provides for the continued evaluation of registered pesticides. A violation of a regulation adopted by the department pursuant to this authority is a crime. This bill would require the department, by July 1, 2018, to issue a determination with respect to its reevaluation of neonicotinoids. The bill would require the department, on or before 2 years after making this determination, to adopt any control measures necessary to protect pollinator health.The bill would require the department to submit a report to the appropriate committees of the Legislature if the department is unable to adopt those control measures and to update the report annually until the department adopts those control measures. Hide

AB 1806 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend Sections 48915.5, 48918.1, 51225.1, and 51225.2 of the Education Code, Relating to Pupil Services.

Pupil services: homeless children or youth

Richard Bloom / The bill was voted on by the Senate on August 21, 2014.

(1)Existing law, if an individual with exceptional needs is a foster child, as defined, and the local educational agency has proposed a change of placement due to an act for which a decision to recommend expulsion is at the discretion of the principal or the district superintendent of schools, requires the attorney for the individual with exceptional needs and an appropriate representative of the… More
(1)Existing law, if an individual with exceptional needs is a foster child, as defined, and the local educational agency has proposed a change of placement due to an act for which a decision to recommend expulsion is at the discretion of the principal or the district superintendent of schools, requires the attorney for the individual with exceptional needs and an appropriate representative of the county child welfare agency to be invited to participate in the individualized education program team meeting that makes a manifestation determination, as specified. This bill, if an individual with exceptional needs is a homeless child or youth, as defined, and the local educational agency has proposed a change of placement due to an act for which a decision to recommend expulsion is at the discretion of the principal or the district superintendent of schools, would require the designated local educational agency liaison for homeless children and youth to be invited to participate in the individualized education program team meeting that makes a manifestation determination, as specified. (2)Existing law, if the decision to recommend expulsion is a discretionary act and the pupil is a foster child, as defined, requires the governing board of the school district to provide notice of the expulsion hearing to the pupil’s attorney and an appropriate representative of the county child welfare agency, as specified. Existing law, if a recommendation of expulsion is required and the pupil is a foster child, as defined, authorizes the governing board of the school district to provide notice of the expulsion hearing to the pupil’s attorney and an appropriate representative of the county child welfare agency, as specified. This bill, if the decision to recommend expulsion is a discretionary act and the pupil is a homeless child or youth, as defined, would require the governing board of the school district to provide notice of the expulsion hearing to the designated local educational agency liaison for homeless children and youth, as specified. The bill, if a recommendation of expulsion is required and the pupil is a homeless child or youth, as defined, would authorize the governing board of the school district to provide notice of the expulsion hearing to the designated local educational agency liaison for homeless children and youth, as specified. (3)Existing law requires a school district to exempt a pupil in foster care, as defined, who transfers between schools any time after the completion of the pupil’s 2nd year of high school from all coursework and other requirements adopted by the governing board of the school district that are in addition to certain statewide coursework requirements unless the school district makes a finding that the pupil is reasonably able to complete the school district’s graduation requirements in time to graduate from high school by the end of the pupil’s 4th year of high school. Existing law requires, among other things, the school district to take specified actions if it determines that the pupil in foster care is reasonably able to complete the school district’s graduation requirements within the pupil’s 5th year of high school. This bill would extend these provisions to a pupil who is a homeless child or youth, as defined. By requiring school districts to perform additional duties in complying with the exemption requirements, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. (4)Existing law requires a school district and county office of education to accept coursework satisfactorily completed by a pupil in foster care, as defined, while attending another public school, a juvenile court school, or a nonpublic, nonsectarian school or agency even if the pupil did not complete the entire course and requires the school district and county office of education to issue that pupil full or partial credit for the coursework completed. Existing law prohibits a school district or county office of education from, among other things, requiring a pupil in foster care to retake a course if the pupil has satisfactorily completed the entire course in a public school, a juvenile court school, or a nonpublic, nonsectarian school or agency. Existing law provides that a pupil in foster care shall not be prohibited from retaking or taking a course to meet the eligibility requirements for admission to the California State University or the University of California. This bill would extend these provisions to a pupil who is a homeless child or youth, as defined. By requiring a school district and county office of education to perform additional duties in complying with the requirements to accept coursework, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. (5)The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to these statutory provisions. Hide