California Bills: Search Results

Results 41-50 of 14,976 bills

AB 1335 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend Sections 667.61 and 667.9 of the Penal Code, Relating to Sex Offenses.

Sex offenses: disabled victims

Brian Maienschein / The bill was voted on by a Senate committee on June 23, 2014.

(1)Existing law, as amended by Proposition 83, the Sexual Predator Punishment and Control Act (Jessica’s Law), approved by the voters at the November 7, 2006, statewide general election, provides that a defendant shall be punished by imprisonment in the state prison for 25 years to life if convicted of certain crimes, including rape, sexual penetration, sodomy, oral copulation, continuous… More
(1)Existing law, as amended by Proposition 83, the Sexual Predator Punishment and Control Act (Jessica’s Law), approved by the voters at the November 7, 2006, statewide general election, provides that a defendant shall be punished by imprisonment in the state prison for 25 years to life if convicted of certain crimes, including rape, sexual penetration, sodomy, oral copulation, continuous sexual abuse of a child, or rape, spousal rape, or sexual penetration in concert, if certain circumstances were present, including, among other things, in the commission of that offense, any person kidnapped the victim, tortured the victim, or committed the offense during the commission of a burglary, as specified. Existing law further provides that a defendant shall be punished by imprisonment in the state prison for 15 years to life if convicted of certain crimes, including rape, sexual penetration, sodomy, oral copulation, continuous sexual abuse of a child, or rape, spousal rape, or sexual penetration in concert, if certain circumstances were present, including, among other things, in the commission of that offense any person, except as specified in the provisions above, kidnapped the victim, committed the offense during the commission of a burglary, or used a dangerous or deadly weapon in the commission of the offense. Proposition 83 provides that the Legislature may amend the provisions of the act to expand the scope of their application or increase the punishment or penalties by a statute passed by a majority vote of each house. This bill would add the crimes of rape, sexual penetration, sodomy, and oral copulation, perpetrated against a person who is incapable, because of a mental disorder or developmental or physical disability, of giving legal consent, to the above provisions, if the victim is developmentally disabled, as defined. By applying the above enhancements to these crimes, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. (2)Existing law provides that a defendant shall be punished by imprisonment in the state prison for 25 years to life if convicted of certain crimes, including rape, spousal rape or sexual penetration in concert, sexual penetration, sodomy, or oral copulation if certain circumstances were present, including, among other things, in the commission of that offense any person kidnapped the victim, committed the offense during the commission of a burglary, or used a dangerous or deadly weapon in the commission of the offense, or under other specified circumstances, and the crime was committed against a minor 14 years of age or older. This bill would add the crimes of rape, sexual penetration, sodomy, and oral copulation, perpetrated against a person who is incapable, because of a mental disorder or developmental or physical disability, of giving legal consent, to the above provisions, if the victim is developmentally disabled, as defined. By applying the above enhancements to these crimes, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. (3)Existing law requires that a person who commits certain enumerated crimes, including rape, sodomy, oral copulation, and sexual penetration, against a person who is 65 years of age or older, or against a person who is blind, deaf, developmentally disabled, a paraplegic, or a quadriplegic, or against a person who is under 14 years of age, receive a one-year sentence enhancement and requires that any person having a prior conviction for any of the enumerated offenses receive a 2-year sentence enhancement. This bill would add to the enumerated list of crimes rape, sodomy, oral copulation, and sexual penetration, perpetrated against a person who is incapable, because of a mental disorder or developmental or physical disability, of giving legal consent. By applying the above enhancements to these crimes, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. (4)The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide

AB 1347 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend Sections 19596.2 and 19604 of the Business and Professions Code, Relating to Horse Racing.

Horse racing: out-of-state thoroughbred races

Adam Gray / The bill was voted on by a Senate committee on June 25, 2013.

Existing law authorizes a thoroughbred racing association or fair to distribute the audiovisual signal and accept wagers on the results of out-of-state thoroughbred races conducted in the United States during the calendar period the association or fair is conducting a race meeting, including days on which there is no live racing being conducted by the association or fair, without the consent of… More
Existing law authorizes a thoroughbred racing association or fair to distribute the audiovisual signal and accept wagers on the results of out-of-state thoroughbred races conducted in the United States during the calendar period the association or fair is conducting a race meeting, including days on which there is no live racing being conducted by the association or fair, without the consent of the organization that represents horsemen and horsewomen participating in the race meeting and without regard to the amount of purses. Under existing law, the total number of thoroughbred races imported by associations or fairs on a statewide basis under these provisions may not exceed 50 per day on days when live thoroughbred or fair racing is being conducted in the state, with the exception of prescribed races, including races imported that are part of the race card of the Kentucky Derby, the Kentucky Oaks, the Preakness Stakes, the Belmont Stakes, the Jockey Club Gold Cup, the Travers Stakes, the Arlington Million, the Breeders’ Cup, the Dubai Cup, the Arkansas Derby, or the Haskell Invitational. This bill would also exempt from the 50 race per day limitation, races imported that are part of the race card of the Wood Memorial.Existing law authorizes advance deposit wagering to be conducted, with the approval of the California Horse Racing Board, in accordance with specified provisions of law. Existing law requires a certain percentage of wagers on out-of-state and out-of-country thoroughbred races conducted after 6 p.m., Pacific time, together with the total amount remaining from advance deposit wagering originating from California out-of-state and out-of-country harness and quarter horse races conducted at that time, to be distributed as commissions, as specified, based on the amount handled in state on each breed’s own live races in the previous year by that association or its predecessor association.This bill would instead require the amount to be based on the amount handled in state on each association’s live races in the previous year by that association or its predecessor association. The bill would make other nonsubstantive changes. Hide

AB 1348 (2013-2014) - An Act to Add Chapter 7.5 (Commencing with Section 66550) To, and to Repeal Chapter 11 (Commencing with Section 66900) Of, Part 40 of Division 5 of Title 3 of the Education Code, Relating to Postsecondary Education.

Postsecondary education: California Higher Education Authority

John Perez / The bill was voted on by a Senate committee on August 4, 2014.

Existing law establishes the system of postsecondary education in this state, consisting of 5 segments: the University of California, the California State University, the California Community Colleges, independent institutions of higher education, and private postsecondary educational institutions, as defined. Existing law establishes the California Postsecondary Education Commission (CPEC) to be… More
Existing law establishes the system of postsecondary education in this state, consisting of 5 segments: the University of California, the California State University, the California Community Colleges, independent institutions of higher education, and private postsecondary educational institutions, as defined. Existing law establishes the California Postsecondary Education Commission (CPEC) to be responsible for coordinating public, independent, and private postsecondary education in this state and to provide independent policy analyses and recommendations to the Legislature and the Governor on postsecondary education issues. The Budget Act of 2011 deleted funding and personnel from CPEC. This bill would repeal the provisions establishing and providing for the duties of CPEC, and commencing July 1, 2015, would establish the California Higher Education Authority, under the administration of an 11-member board of directors. The bill would specify the appointing authorities and the length of the terms of the members of the board of directors. The bill would establish a 9-member student advisory committee to advise the board of directors on all matters related to student fees and policies, student financial aid, student services, student life, and other appropriate educational policy. The bill would also set forth the responsibilities of the authority relating to public and private postsecondary education in this state, to be carried out by the authority in accordance with a specified schedule. The bill would require the board of directors to convene a technical working group, including specified persons, to advise on data and policy matters before the board of directors. Among other duties, the authority would be responsible for developing, presenting, and monitoring state goals for postsecondary education, and the development of appropriate metrics that shall be used to monitor and report on the progress of the postsecondary segments toward meeting those state goals, as specified; measuring, and reporting about, how efficiently and effectively the postsecondary segments are serving the state’s needs; making recommendations about how to improve the performance of the postsecondary segments; developing and recommending strategic finance policy to the Governor and the Legislature on topics including, but not necessarily limited to, the allocation of state appropriations among the postsecondary education segments, student fee policy, and student financial aid; developing and presenting basic policy parameters for capacity development or realignment, including, but not necessarily limited to, expansion or realignment of enrollment capacity among or within the postsecondary education segments, to meet the state’s higher education goals; reviewing, and making recommendations to the Governor and the Legislature relating to, major capacity decisions, such as changes in mission or the establishment of new campuses or centers, that are to be financed from specified funding sources; and acting as a clearinghouse for postsecondary education information and as a primary source of information for the Legislature, the Governor, and other agencies, and succeeding to certain data management responsibilities of CPEC by developing and maintaining a comprehensive database in accordance with prescribed criteria. Hide

AB 135 (2013-2014) - An Act to Add Section 44692 to the Education Code, Relating to School Employees.

School employees: child abuse: reporting

Joan Buchanan / The bill was voted on by a Senate committee on June 23, 2014.

Existing law requires the State Office of Child Abuse Prevention to develop and disseminate information to all school districts and district school personnel regarding the detection of child abuse. Existing law, the Child Abuse and Neglect Reporting Act, designates certain persons, including teachers, as mandated reporters. Existing law requires a mandated reporter to make a report if the person… More
Existing law requires the State Office of Child Abuse Prevention to develop and disseminate information to all school districts and district school personnel regarding the detection of child abuse. Existing law, the Child Abuse and Neglect Reporting Act, designates certain persons, including teachers, as mandated reporters. Existing law requires a mandated reporter to make a report if the person has knowledge of or observes a child whom the person knows or reasonably suspects has been the victim of child abuse or neglect. Existing law also provides that the California School for the Blind and the California School for the Deaf are under the administration of the State Department of Education. This bill would require the governing board of each school district and county office of education, the governing body of each charter school, and, for purposes of the California School for the Blind and the California School for the Deaf, the department, to adopt a policy on the reporting of child abuse and the responsibilities of mandated reporters. The bill would require each school district, charter school, and county office of education, the California School for the Blind, and the California School for the Deaf to, at minimum, review the mandated reporting requirements of school employees with all school personnel within the first 6 weeks of each school year, at a regularly scheduled staff meeting. By expanding the duty of school districts, charter schools, and county offices of education, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to these statutory provisions. Hide

AB 1360 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend Sections 5110, 5120, 5125, and 5260 Of, and to Add Section 5116 To, the Civil Code, Relating to Common Interest Developments.

Common interest developments: electronic voting

Norma Torres / The bill was voted on by a Senate committee on June 24, 2014.

Existing law, the Davis-Stirling Common Interest Development Act, defines and regulates common interest developments, which include community apartment projects, condominium projects, planned developments, and stock cooperatives. These provisions require that a common interest development be managed by an association and that elections related to the governance or administration of the common… More
Existing law, the Davis-Stirling Common Interest Development Act, defines and regulates common interest developments, which include community apartment projects, condominium projects, planned developments, and stock cooperatives. These provisions require that a common interest development be managed by an association and that elections related to the governance or administration of the common interest development conform to specified requirements, including, among other things, the requirement that the association adopt rules to allow one or more inspectors to appoint or oversee independent 3rd parties to verify signatures and count and tabulate votes. Existing law authorizes a secret paper ballot to be distributed and voted upon by the membership without a meeting, and imposes other requirements relating to proxies and secret ballots. Existing law authorizes a member of an association to bring a civil action to enforce his or her rights and authorizes a court to impose a civil penalty of up to $500 for a violation of the provisions governing elections. Existing law requires that the sealed ballots remain in the custody of the inspector or inspectors of elections or at a location designated by the inspector or inspectors until after the tabulation of the vote, and until the time allowed for challenging the election has expired, when custody is required to be transferred to the association. This bill would authorize an association to conduct elections by electronic voting, as specified, and would enact related provisions. The bill would require an association, if electronic voting is to be conducted, to provide each member with an opportunity to indicate that he or she will be voting electronically and to provide ballots, as specified. The bill would require the electronic balloting service provider to retain the electronically submitted ballot data until the time allowed for challenging the election has expired.This bill set forth minimum requirements of an electronic voting system for an association’s election. The bill would also authorize the Secretary of State to study and adopt regulations governing the use of electronic voting systems to determine whether the systems are capable of complying with these requirements.The bill would also declare the Legislature’s intent in this regard. Hide

AB 1364 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend Section 69435 of the Education Code, Relating to Student Financial Aid.

Student financial aid: Cal Grant Program

Phil Ting / The bill was voted on by a Senate committee on August 12, 2013.

Existing law, the Ortiz-Pacheco-Poochigian-Vasconcellos Cal Grant Program, establishes the Cal Grant A and B Entitlement awards, the California Community College Transfer Cal Grant Entitlement awards, the Competitive Cal Grant A and B awards, the Cal Grant C awards, and the Cal Grant T awards under the administration of the Student Aid Commission, and establishes eligibility requirements and… More
Existing law, the Ortiz-Pacheco-Poochigian-Vasconcellos Cal Grant Program, establishes the Cal Grant A and B Entitlement awards, the California Community College Transfer Cal Grant Entitlement awards, the Competitive Cal Grant A and B awards, the Cal Grant C awards, and the Cal Grant T awards under the administration of the Student Aid Commission, and establishes eligibility requirements and maximum levels for awards under these programs for participating students attending qualifying institutions. Existing law requires that a Cal Grant B award for access costs, as defined, is not to exceed $1,551 annually. Existing law provides that this amount may be adjusted in the annual Budget Act. This bill, commencing with the 2014–15 academic year, would require that the Cal Grant B access award be no less than $1,710, unless that amount exceeds the amount of the student’s calculated financial need, as specified. The bill would require the award for access costs to include the percentage increase, if any, in the California Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers, as specified. In the event of a decrease in the California Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers from the prior academic year, the award amount would remain at its most recent level, as specified. The bill would delete the provision authorizing the adjustment of this amount in the annual Budget Act. Hide

AB 1383 (2013-2014) - An Act to Add and Repeal Section 14035 of the Elections Code, Relating to Elections.

District-based municipal elections

Roger Hernandez / The bill was voted on by a Senate committee on June 26, 2013.

Existing law provides for political subdivisions that encompass areas of representation within the state. With respect to these areas, public officials are generally elected by all of the voters of the political subdivision (at-large) or from districts formed within the political subdivision (district-based). Existing law, the California Voting Rights Act of 2001, prohibits an at-large method of… More
Existing law provides for political subdivisions that encompass areas of representation within the state. With respect to these areas, public officials are generally elected by all of the voters of the political subdivision (at-large) or from districts formed within the political subdivision (district-based). Existing law, the California Voting Rights Act of 2001, prohibits an at-large method of election to be imposed or applied in a manner that impairs the ability of a protected class to elect candidates of its choice or its ability to influence the outcome of an election, as a result of the dilution or the abridgment of the rights of voters who are members of a protected class, as defined. Existing law authorizes the legislative body of a city to submit to voters at any municipal or special election an ordinance providing for the election of members of the legislative body by districts, from districts, by districts with an elective mayor, or from districts with an elective mayor. Under existing law, “by district” means election of members of the legislative body by voters of the district alone and “from district” means election of members of the legislative body who are residents of the district from which they are elected by the voters of the entire city. Existing law prescribes the procedures for the electors to change from the election of these members by district to election from districts or vice versa. This bill would permit the legislative body of a city to provide by ordinance, without submitting the ordinance to the voters of the city for approval, for the election of members of the legislative body by district if the voters of the city previously rejected such an ordinance, as specified. This provision would be repealed on December 31, 2016. The bill would, commencing January 1, 2017, require the legislative body of a city with a population of 100,000 or more, as determined by the most recent federal decennial census, to provide by ordinance, without submitting the ordinance to the voters of the city for approval, for the election of members of the legislative body by district. The bill would, commencing January 1, 2017, permit the legislative body of any other city to provide by ordinance, without submitting the ordinance to the voters of the city for approval, for the election of members of the legislative body by district. The bill would require that the boundary lines of each district be adjusted in accordance with specified provisions of law. By requiring cities to conduct elections for members of their legislative bodies in a specified manner, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to these statutory provisions. Hide

AB 1396 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend Sections 25005, 29503, and 31004 of the Corporations Code, to Amend Sections 125, 300, 320, 4805.055, 5104, 5106, 12003, 14003, 14200.1, 14200.2, 17002, 18002, 18002.5, 22005, 30002, 31055, and 50003 Of, to Repeal and Add Sections 321, 351, and 371 Of, and to Amend the Headings of Chapter 3 (Commencing with Section 300) Of, and Article 2 (Commencing with Section 320) of Chapter 3 of Division 1 Of, the Financial Code, and to Amend Sections 11552, 13978.6, and 13984 Of, and to Add Section 12804 To, the Government Code, Relating to Financial Institutions.

Department of Financial Services

Assembly Committee on Banking and Finance / The bill was voted on by the Assembly on May 23, 2013.

Existing law, until July 1, 2013, creates the Department of Corporations and the Department of Financial Institutions within the Business, Transportation and Housing Agency. The Department of Corporations provides for the licensure and regulation of businesses engaged in financial transactions, including securities brokers and dealers, investment advisors, financial planners, and certain… More
Existing law, until July 1, 2013, creates the Department of Corporations and the Department of Financial Institutions within the Business, Transportation and Housing Agency. The Department of Corporations provides for the licensure and regulation of businesses engaged in financial transactions, including securities brokers and dealers, investment advisors, financial planners, and certain fiduciaries and lenders, as specified. The Department of Financial Institutions oversees the operation of state-chartered financial institutions, including banks, credit unions, and various entities providing financial services. The Commissioner of Corporations and the Commissioner of Financial Institutions are responsible for overseeing and carrying out the duties and responsibilities of their respective departments. The Governor’s Reorganization Plan No. 2 of 2012 (GRP 2), effective July 1, 2013, abolishes the Department of Corporations and the Department of Financial Institutions and transfer their responsibilities to the Department of Business Oversight, which would be established within the Business and Consumer Services Agency. The executive officer of the new Department of Business Oversight would be the Commissioner of Business Oversight. The department is organized to include a Division of Corporations and a Division of Financial Institutions, each of which would be overseen by a deputy commissioner of the department. This bill would delete references to the Department of Business Oversight, as provided for in the GRP 2, and would instead transfer the duties of the Department of Corporations and the Department of Financial Institutions to the Department of Financial Services, as specified. The bill also would make various technical changes provided for in the GRP 2. Hide

AB 1402 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend Section 6213 of the Business and Professions Code, Relating to Attorneys.

Attorneys

Senate Committee on Judiciary / The bill was voted on by the Assembly on May 6, 2013.

Existing law, the State Bar Act, provides for the licensure and regulation of attorneys by the State Bar of California, a public corporation. Existing law requires an attorney or law firm receiving or disbursing trust funds to establish and maintain an IOLTA account, as defined, in which the attorney or law firm is required to deposit or invest all specified client deposits or funds. Existing law… More
Existing law, the State Bar Act, provides for the licensure and regulation of attorneys by the State Bar of California, a public corporation. Existing law requires an attorney or law firm receiving or disbursing trust funds to establish and maintain an IOLTA account, as defined, in which the attorney or law firm is required to deposit or invest all specified client deposits or funds. Existing law requires an attorney or law firm establishing an IOLTA account to report IOLTA account compliance and all other IOLTA account information required by the State Bar in the manner specified by the State Bar. This bill would make a technical correction to a definition related to IOLTA accounts. Hide

AB 1413 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend Sections 19565, 23036, 23701, and 23701d of the Revenue and Taxation Code, Relating to Taxation.

Corporation Tax Law: tentative minimum tax: credits: exempt organizations

/ The bill was voted on by a Senate committee on August 12, 2013.

The Corporation Tax Law provides various credits against the taxes imposed by that law, including a credit for qualified expenditures for the production of qualified motion pictures in the state. Existing law provides for a tentative minimum tax and further provides that, except for specified credits, no other credit shall reduce the tax imposed below the tentative minimum tax. This bill would… More
The Corporation Tax Law provides various credits against the taxes imposed by that law, including a credit for qualified expenditures for the production of qualified motion pictures in the state. Existing law provides for a tentative minimum tax and further provides that, except for specified credits, no other credit shall reduce the tax imposed below the tentative minimum tax. This bill would additionally allow, for taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2011, the credit for qualified expenditures for the production of qualified motion pictures to reduce the tentative minimum tax. This bill would make findings related to the public purpose served by the bill. The Corporation Tax Law, in modified conformity with federal income tax laws, exempts various types of organizations from state income taxes imposed by that law. Existing law establishes a streamlined method by which organizations that have obtained a ruling or determination from the Internal Revenue Code that it is exempt from federal income taxes as an organization described in Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code may obtain exemption from state income taxes, as provided. This bill would allow an organization that has obtained a ruling or determination from the Internal Revenue Code that it is exempt from federal income taxes as an organization described in Section 501(c)(3), (c)(4), (c)(5), (c)(6), or (c)(7) of the Internal Revenue Code to use this streamlined method. This bill would also make conforming changes. Hide