California Bills: Search Results

Results 61-70 of 14,976 bills

AB 2530 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend Sections 3019, 14310, 15101, 15320, and 15350 of the Elections Code, Relating to Elections.

Ballot processing

Freddie Rodriguez / The bill has become law (chaptered).

Existing law requires an elections official to compare the signature on the envelope of a vote by mail ballot, a mail ballot precinct ballot, or a provisional ballot with the signature that appears on the voter’s affidavit of registration, as specified. If the elections official determines that the signatures do not compare, existing law requires that the ballot be rejected, as specified. This… More
Existing law requires an elections official to compare the signature on the envelope of a vote by mail ballot, a mail ballot precinct ballot, or a provisional ballot with the signature that appears on the voter’s affidavit of registration, as specified. If the elections official determines that the signatures do not compare, existing law requires that the ballot be rejected, as specified. This bill would provide that if a vote by mail ballot, mail ballot precinct ballot, or provisional ballot is processed using signature verification technology that determines the signatures do not compare, the elections official is required to visually examine and verify that the signatures do not compare before rejecting the ballot. By imposing additional duties on local elections officials, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. This bill would incorporate additional changes to Section 15101 of the Elections Code proposed by SB 29, to be operative only if SB 29 and this bill are both chaptered and become effective January 1, 2015, and this bill is chaptered last. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to these statutory provisions. Hide

AB 2539 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend Sections 114349 and 114371 of the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Certified Farmers’ Markets.

Certified farmers’ markets

Phil Ting / The bill has become law (chaptered).

Existing law, the California Retail Food Code, establishes uniform health and sanitation standards for retail food facilities and various types of food. Among other things, the code requires temporary food facilities that handle nonprepackaged food to protect the food from contamination by taking 3 specified actions, including enclosure of the food facility with 16 mesh per square inch screens… More
Existing law, the California Retail Food Code, establishes uniform health and sanitation standards for retail food facilities and various types of food. Among other things, the code requires temporary food facilities that handle nonprepackaged food to protect the food from contamination by taking 3 specified actions, including enclosure of the food facility with 16 mesh per square inch screens and limiting the display and handling of nonprepackaged food. The code also establishes specified food safety and sanitation requirements for certified farmers’ markets governing food preparation, storage, and sampling, among other things. Existing law provides that local health agencies are primarily responsible for enforcing the code, but requires the State Department of Public Health to provide technical assistance, training, standardization, program evaluation, and other services to the local health agencies as necessary to ensure the uniform interpretation and application of the code, and to adopt regulations to implement and administer the code. A person who violates any provision of the code is guilty of a misdemeanor, except as otherwise provided. This bill would revise certain requirements imposed on temporary food facilities and certified farmers’ markets. Among other things, the bill would require temporary food facilities that handle nonprepackaged food to protect the food from contamination by taking any, rather than all, of the 3 actions specified pursuant to existing law and make another change. The bill would also revise the food safety and sanitation requirements imposed upon certified farmers’ markets. The bill would provide that trimming whole produce for sale is not food preparation for purposes of a provision generally prohibiting food preparation at certified farmers’ markets. Among other things the bill would require that each food sample be distributed in a manner in which each sample is distributed without the possibility of a consumer touching the remaining samples. The bill would require that all harvested, cut, wrapped, or otherwise processed meat, poultry, and fish products offered for sale be transported, stored, displayed, and maintained at a temperature of 41°F or colder, and would require that all meat, poultry, and fish products be stored in a manner that reduces the risk of cross-contamination. The bill would also prohibit smoking within 25 feet of the common commerce area, as described, of a certified farmers’ market. By imposing new enforcement requirements on local health agencies, and by creating a new crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that with regard to certain mandates no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. With regard to any other mandates, this bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs so mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above. Hide

AB 2551 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend Section 9401 of the Elections Code, Relating to Elections.

Local ballot measures: bond issues

Scott Wilk / The bill has become law (chaptered).

Existing law requires all bond issues proposed by a county, city and county, city, district, or other political subdivision, or by any agency, department, or board thereof, to be submitted to the voters for approval. Existing law requires all official materials for the bond issue proposal to contain a statement of specified tax rate data. This bill would require the statement to include the best… More
Existing law requires all bond issues proposed by a county, city and county, city, district, or other political subdivision, or by any agency, department, or board thereof, to be submitted to the voters for approval. Existing law requires all official materials for the bond issue proposal to contain a statement of specified tax rate data. This bill would require the statement to include the best estimate from official sources of the total debt service that would be required to be repaid if all the bonds are issued and sold. Hide

AB 2562 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend Section 5091 of the Education Code, to Amend Sections 100, 105, 2102, 2107, 9020, 9285, 14300, 17301, 17302, and 19202 Of, and to Repeal Section 10552 Of, the Elections Code, Relating to Elections.

Elections

Paul Fong / The bill has become law (chaptered).

(1)Existing law provides that whenever a vacancy occurs or a resignation containing a deferred effective date has been filed with the county superintendent of schools, the school district or community college district governing board is required, within 60 days, to either order an election or make a provisional appointment. Existing law provides that if a provisional appointment is made, the… More
(1)Existing law provides that whenever a vacancy occurs or a resignation containing a deferred effective date has been filed with the county superintendent of schools, the school district or community college district governing board is required, within 60 days, to either order an election or make a provisional appointment. Existing law provides that if a provisional appointment is made, the registered voters of the district may, within 30 days, petition for a special election to fill the vacancy, and requires a specified number of registered voters of the district to sign the petition. This bill would clarify the meaning of “registered voters” of the district for purposes of those provisions. (2)Under existing law, a person may not be registered to vote except by affidavit of registration. Existing law requires a properly executed registration to be deemed effective upon receipt of the affidavit of registration by the county elections official if the affidavit is postmarked, submitted to the Department of Motor Vehicles or a voter registration agency, or delivered to the county elections official by other means on or before the 15th day prior to the election. This bill would also require the registration to be deemed effective upon receipt of the affidavit by the county elections official if the affidavit is submitted electronically on the Internet Web site of the Secretary of State on or before the 15th day prior to the election. (3)Existing law entitles only an eligible registered voter to sign an initiative, referendum, recall, nominating petition or paper, or any other petition or paper and requires each signer to personally affix his or her signature, printed name, and place of residence on the petition or paper. Existing law requires the elections official, when verifying signatures on a petition or paper, to determine that the residence address on the petition or paper is the same as the residence address on the affidavit of registration. If the addresses are different, the petition or paper does not specify the residence address, or certain information is not included, existing law requires that the affected signature not be counted as valid. This bill would prohibit an elections official who is verifying signatures on a petition or paper from invalidating a signature for an incomplete or inaccurate apartment or unit number in the residence address. (4)Existing law requires the county elections official to file with the Secretary of State a statement containing specified information for each election in the county held pursuant to the Uniform District Election Law. Existing law requires the county elections official to file the statement no later than December 31 immediately following a general district election. This bill would repeal these provisions. (5)Existing law regulates generally the issuing of ballots on election day as well as the use of direct recording electronic voting systems. Existing law defines the terms “direct recording electronic voting system” and “paper record copy” for purposes of these provisions. This bill would correct erroneous cross references to the code section that defines those terms. This bill would incorporate additional changes to Section 2102 of the Elections Code proposed by SB 113 that would become operative only if SB 113 and this bill are both chaptered and become effective on or before January 1, 2015, and this bill is chaptered last. Hide

AB 26 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend Section 1720 of the Labor Code, Relating to Prevailing Wage.

Construction: prevailing wage

Susan Bonilla / The bill has become law (chaptered).

Existing law defines the term “public works” for purposes of requirements regarding the payment of prevailing wages. Existing law generally defines “public works” to include construction, alteration, demolition, installation, or repair work done under contract and paid in whole or in part out of public funds. Existing law defines “construction” for these purposes to include work… More
Existing law defines the term “public works” for purposes of requirements regarding the payment of prevailing wages. Existing law generally defines “public works” to include construction, alteration, demolition, installation, or repair work done under contract and paid in whole or in part out of public funds. Existing law defines “construction” for these purposes to include work performed during the design and preconstruction phases of construction. Existing law makes a willful violation of laws relating to payment of prevailing wages on public works a misdemeanor. This bill would revise the definition of “construction” to also include work performed during the postconstruction phases of construction, including, but not limited to, all cleanup work at the jobsite. By expanding the definition of a crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. This bill would incorporate additional changes in Section 1720 of the Labor Code proposed by AB 2272, that would become operative only if SB 2272 and this bill are both chaptered and become effective on or before January 1, 2015, and this bill is chaptered last. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide

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AB 2617 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend Sections 51.7, 52, and 52.1 of the Civil Code, Relating to Civil Rights.

Civil rights: waiver of rights

Shirley Weber / The bill has become law (chaptered).

Existing civil rights provisions provide that all persons within the jurisdiction of this state have the right to be free from any violence, or intimidation by threat of violence, committed against their persons or property because of political affiliation, or on account of position in a labor dispute, or sex, race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, disability, or medical condition, or… More
Existing civil rights provisions provide that all persons within the jurisdiction of this state have the right to be free from any violence, or intimidation by threat of violence, committed against their persons or property because of political affiliation, or on account of position in a labor dispute, or sex, race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, disability, or medical condition, or because another person perceives them to have one or more of those characteristics. Those civil rights provisions provide civil remedies for violations of their provisions. This bill would prohibit a person from requiring a waiver of the protections afforded under those provisions as a condition of entering into a contract for the provision of goods or services, including the right to file and pursue a civil action or complaint with, or otherwise notify, the Attorney General or any other public prosecutor, or law enforcement agency, the Department of Fair Employment and Housing, or any court or other governmental entity. This bill would require any waiver of the protections afforded under those provisions to be knowing and voluntary, and in writing, and expressly not made as a condition of entering into the contract or as a condition of providing or receiving goods or services. This bill would provide that any person seeking the enforcement of a waiver of the protections afforded under those civil rights provisions shall have the burden of proving that the waiver was knowing and voluntary and not made as a condition of the contract or of providing or receiving the goods or services. The bill’s provisions would apply to contracts entered into, altered, modified, renewed, or extended on and after January 1, 2015. This bill would provide that its provisions shall not be construed to negate other specified provisions. This bill would include legislative findings and declarations with respect to the public policy underlying its provisions. This bill would incorporate additional changes to Section 52.1 of the Civil Code proposed by AB 2634 that would become operative only if this bill and AB 2634 are both chaptered and this bill is chaptered last. Hide

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AB 2631 (2013-2014) - An Act to Amend Sections 361, 3018, 15250, and 19371 Of, to Amend the Heading of Article 5 (Commencing with Section 13282) of Chapter 3 of Division 13 Of, to Amend and Renumber Sections 19382 and 19385 Of, to Add Section 15250.5 To, and to Repeal Sections 13283, 13284, 13285, 13286, 13287, 13288, 13289, 19370, 19380, 19381, 19383, 19384, and 19386 Of, the Elections Code, Relating to Elections.

Elections: voting machines

Matt Dababneh / The bill has become law (chaptered).

Existing law provides for the conduct of statewide and local elections and sets forth provisions governing, among other things, election procedures, the declaration of results, and election contests. Existing law defines for these purposes the term “voting machine” to mean any device upon which a voter may register his or her vote, and which, by means of counters, embossing, or printouts,… More
Existing law provides for the conduct of statewide and local elections and sets forth provisions governing, among other things, election procedures, the declaration of results, and election contests. Existing law defines for these purposes the term “voting machine” to mean any device upon which a voter may register his or her vote, and which, by means of counters, embossing, or printouts, furnishes a total of the number of votes cast for each candidate or measure. Existing law requires that the Secretary of State certify or conditionally approve a direct recording electronic voting system only if the system includes an accessible voter verified paper audit trail. Existing law defines for these purposes the term “direct recording electronic voting system” as a voting system that records a vote electronically and does not require or permit the voter to record his or her vote directly onto a tangible ballot. This bill would modify and update the definition of “voting machine” to mean any electronic device into which a voter may enter his or her votes, and which, by means of electronic tabulation and generation of specified printouts and records, furnishes a total of the number of votes cast for each candidate or measure. The bill would make conforming changes and repeal obsolete provisions of existing law. The bill would substitute certain references to the term “voting system” with the term “direct recording electronic voting system.” Existing law specifies the procedure to be followed for counting ballots in connection with the semifinal official canvass for an election. Existing law requires a precinct board to complete a certificate of performance and to post a results of votes cast form if votes are manually counted at the precinct, among other requirements. This bill would require a precinct board counting votes at the precinct by means of a voting machine to also complete a certificate of performance and to post a results of votes cast form, as specified. Existing law requires the precinct board, as soon as the polls are closed, to comply with specified requirements relating to the closing of the polls, including, but not limited to, the locking of voting machines and the reading and posting of the statement of return of votes cast for the precinct. Existing law also sets forth the procedures by which the proclamation of the result of the votes cast must be distinctly announced. This bill would modify and repeal certain precinct board requirements and procedures relating to the reading, posting, and inspection of the statement of return of votes cast for the precinct. By imposing new duties on local officials, the bill would create a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to these statutory provisions. Hide

AB 2643 (2013-2014) - An Act to Add Section 1708.85 to the Civil Code, Relating to Privacy.

Invasion of privacy: distribution of sexually explicit materials

Bob Wieckowski / The bill has become law (chaptered).

Existing law makes it a crime for a person to distribute, with the intent to cause serious emotional distress, a photograph or recorded image of the intimate body part or parts of another identifiable person, under circumstances where the parties agree or understand that the image shall remain private, if the depicted person subsequently suffers serious emotional distress. This bill would create… More
Existing law makes it a crime for a person to distribute, with the intent to cause serious emotional distress, a photograph or recorded image of the intimate body part or parts of another identifiable person, under circumstances where the parties agree or understand that the image shall remain private, if the depicted person subsequently suffers serious emotional distress. This bill would create a private right of action against a person who intentionally distributes a photograph or recorded image of another that exposes the intimate body parts, as defined, of that person or him or her engaged in specified sexual acts, without his or her consent, knowing that the other person had a reasonable expectation that the material would remain private, if specified conditions are met. The bill would establish affirmative defenses to that cause of action, including waiver or consent of the person appearing in the material. In a civil proceeding pursuant to these provisions, the bill would also authorize equitable relief, as specified, and a plaintiff to proceed using a pseudonym instead of his or her true name. The bill would require a plaintiff using a pseudonym in a civil proceeding under these provisions to file a confidential information form, as specified. The bill would make these provisions operative July 1, 2015. This bill would further require the Judicial Council to develop that confidential information form by July 1, 2015. Hide

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AB 2646 (2013-2014) - An Act to Add Section 53.7 to the Civil Code, Relating to Civil Rights.

Civil rights: political structure equal protection

Phil Ting / The bill has become law (chaptered).

The California Constitution prohibits a person from being deprived of life, liberty, or property without due process of law, or from being denied equal protection of the laws. The United States Constitution prohibits a state from denying to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws. Existing case law interprets that provision as guaranteeing racial minorities the right… More
The California Constitution prohibits a person from being deprived of life, liberty, or property without due process of law, or from being denied equal protection of the laws. The United States Constitution prohibits a state from denying to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws. Existing case law interprets that provision as guaranteeing racial minorities the right to full participation in the political life of the community, and prohibiting racial or ethnic groups from being denied, or precluded from entering into the political process in a reliable and meaningful manner. Existing law permits individuals whose personal rights have been violated, in certain circumstances, to bring a civil action for damages or other appropriate relief. This bill would prohibit a statute, ordinance, or other specified enactment from denying a minority group, as defined, political structure equal protection of the law by altering, restructuring, or reordering the policy decisionmaking process in a manner that burdens the ability of members of the minority group to effect the enactment of future legislation, solely with respect to a matter that inures primarily to the benefit of, or is primarily of interest to, one or more minority groups. The bill would authorize a member of a minority group, as defined, to bring a civil action challenging the validity of a statute or ordinance, or other enactment on that basis. The provision in question would be determined valid only upon a showing by the government that the burden it imposes is necessary to serve a compelling public interest, and is no greater than necessary to serve that interest. The bill would include supporting legislative findings and declarations. Hide

AB 2661 (2013-2014) - An Act to Add Article 3.7 (Commencing with Section 87375) to Chapter 7 of Title 9 of the Government Code, and to Repeal and Add Section 25205 of the Public Resources Code, Relating to the Political Reform Act of 1974.

Political Reform Act of 1974: conflicts of interest: Energy Commission

Steven Bradford / This bill was passed by both houses and vetoed by the Governor. It did not become law.

The Political Reform Act of 1974 prohibits a public official from making, participating in making, or in any way attempting to use his or her official position to influence a governmental decision in which the public official knows or has reason to know he or she has a financial interest. The act also imposes certain restrictions on the postgovernmental employment and activities of certain public… More
The Political Reform Act of 1974 prohibits a public official from making, participating in making, or in any way attempting to use his or her official position to influence a governmental decision in which the public official knows or has reason to know he or she has a financial interest. The act also imposes certain restrictions on the postgovernmental employment and activities of certain public officials. The act is administered and enforced by the Fair Political Practices Commission. Existing law establishes the State Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission, commonly known as the Energy Commission. Existing law prescribes certain qualifications for members of the Energy Commission, including a prohibition against receiving a substantial portion of income from specified energy-related entities in the 2 years preceding appointment to the Energy Commission. Existing law prohibits members of the Energy Commission from being employed by an electric utility or applicant or, within 2 years after the member ceases to be a member of the Energy Commission, a person who engages in the sale or manufacture of a major component of a facility. Existing law prohibits a member of the Energy Commission from holding any other elected or appointed public office or position, except as specified. Existing law prohibits persons with specified relationships to a member or employee of the Energy Commission from appearing in proceedings and other matters in which the Energy Commission is a party or has a direct and substantial interest. This bill would repeal these qualification and conflict-of-interest requirements for members and employees of the Energy Commission and recast them within the act. The bill would authorize the Fair Political Practices Commission to exempt a member or employee of the Energy Commission from the application of certain of these provisions if it finds that the member’s or employee’s interest is not sufficiently substantial to affect the integrity of services expected from the member or employee, as specified. A violation of the act is punishable as a misdemeanor. By expanding the definition of an existing crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. The Political Reform Act of 1974, an initiative measure, provides that the Legislature may amend the act to further the act’s purposes upon a 23 vote of each house and compliance with specified procedural requirements. This bill would declare that it furthers the purposes of the act. Hide