Horse breeders

TopicBill numbersort iconAuthorInterest positionBecame law
An Act to Add Chapter 5.2 (Commencing with Section 19990.101) to Division 8 of the Business and Professions Code, Relating to Gambling. AB 431 (2015-2016) GraySupportNo
Existing law, the Gambling Control Act, provides for the licensure and regulation of various legalized gambling activities and establishments by the California Gambling Control Commission and the… More
Existing law, the Gambling Control Act, provides for the licensure and regulation of various legalized gambling activities and establishments by the California Gambling Control Commission and the investigation and enforcement of those activities and establishments by the Department of Justice. This bill would declare the Legislature’s intent regarding the authorization of Internet poker within the borders of the state. The bill would require the Legislature, among other things, to include consumer protections for Californians in any Internet poker framework that may be adopted by the Legislature to authorize Internet poker in the state, to ensure that framework provides a fair share of revenue for the state, and to include strict standards in that framework to ensure that the Internet poker games are fair. The bill would also make related legislative findings and declarations. Hide
An Act to Add Chapter 9 (Commencing with Section 17200) to Part 1 of Division 9 of the Food and Agricultural Code, Relating to Animals. AB 343 (2013-2014) PattersonSupportNo
Existing law establishes a variety of offenses relating to cruelty to animals. Existing law generally provides that a person that violates certain animal at-large provisions is guilty of a… More
Existing law establishes a variety of offenses relating to cruelty to animals. Existing law generally provides that a person that violates certain animal at-large provisions is guilty of a misdemeanor and upon conviction is required to be punished by a fine of not less than $100 nor more than $1,000, by imprisonment of not less than 10 days nor more than 1 year, or by both the fine and imprisonment, as prescribed. This bill would require any person, with certain exceptions, who willfully or knowingly documents evidence of animal cruelty to provide a copy of the documentary evidence obtained to local law enforcement within 120 hours of documentation, and would make a violation of this requirement an infraction punishable by a fine of $250. The bill would provide that a person shall not be civilly or criminally liable for providing documentary evidence of suspected animal cruelty as required by the bill, or for providing a law enforcement agency with information about the person or employer suspected of animal cruelty. The bill would define animal cruelty for its purposes as any act involving an animal, as defined, or poultry, as defined, described in prescribed criminal offenses. The bill would enact other related provisions. Because a violation of the requirement to provide a copy of documentary evidence of animal cruelty to local law enforcement, as prescribed, would be an infraction, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program by creating a new crime. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
An Act to Add Chapter 4.7 (Commencing with Section 19750) to Division 8 of the Business and Professions Code, to Add Section 12012.6 to the Government Code, and to Amend Sections 336.9 and 337a of the Penal Code, Relating to Gambling, and Declaring the Urgency Thereof, to Take Effect Immediately. SB 190 (2013-2014) WrightSupportNo
(1)The California Constitution prohibits various gaming activities within the state, including casino-style gaming, but authorizes the Governor, subject to ratification by the Legislature, to… More
(1)The California Constitution prohibits various gaming activities within the state, including casino-style gaming, but authorizes the Governor, subject to ratification by the Legislature, to negotiate and conclude compacts for the operation of slot machines and the conduct of lottery games and banking and percentage card games by federally recognized Indian tribes on Indian lands in California in accordance with federal law. The California Constitution also authorizes the Legislature to provide for the regulation of horse racing, charitable bingo games, the California State Lottery, and charitable raffles. Existing law prohibits a person, whether or not for gain, hire, or reward, from making a betting pool or placing a bet or wager on the result of any contest or event, including a sporting event, as specified. The Gambling Control Act provides for the licensure of certain individuals and establishments that conduct controlled games, as defined, and for the regulation of these gambling activities by the California Gambling Control Commission. Existing law provides for the enforcement of those regulations by the Department of Justice. Any violation of these provisions is punishable as a misdemeanor, as specified. The Horse Racing Law provides for the licensure of every person who participates in, or has anything to do with, the racing of horses, and every employee of a parimutuel department by the California Horse Racing Board. The board is responsible for adopting rules and regulations for the protection of the public, the control of horse racing, and parimutuel wagering, as well as enforcing all laws, rules, and regulations dealing with horse racing and parimutuel wagering. The law permits the board to authorize an association licensed to conduct a racing meeting to also operate a satellite wagering facility at its racetrack inclosure, and for fairs to locate a satellite wagering facility at their fairgrounds, under specified conditions. Any violation of these provisions is punishable as a misdemeanor. This bill would authorize the owner or operator of a gambling establishment, or the owner or operator of a horse racing track, including a horse racing association, or of a satellite wagering facility, with a current license, to conduct wagering on professional and collegiate sports or athletic events, other than on collegiate sports or athletic events that take place in California or in which any California college team participates, by applying to the California Gambling Control Commission or the California Horse Racing Board, as specified, for authorization to conduct sports wagering, and by paying an annual fee for deposit in the Gambling Addiction Program Fund. The bill would require each licensed entity to remit to the Treasurer on a monthly basis for deposit in the General Fund, an amount equal to 7.5% of its gross revenues generated by sports wagering activities. The bill would require the commission, the board, and the department to adopt regulations to implement these provisions, including authority to adopt regulations establishing fees in a reasonable amount to recover costs incurred performing their duties pursuant to these provisions. The bill would require the department, among other things, to investigate any request made by the board or the commission in connection with an application for authorization, and to investigate suspected violations of the above provisions. The bill would authorize the board, commission, and department to regulate sports wagering to the same extent these entities currently regulate other legal gambling in this state, including the ability to audit the books and records of a licensed entity related to the sports wagering activity. The bill would also prohibit a licensed entity from, among other things, accepting a wager from any person who is under 21 years of age or whose name appears on a self-exclusion list. Any violation of these provisions would be punishable as a crime. By creating a new crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. (2)Existing federal law, the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988 (IGRA), provides for the negotiation and execution of tribal-state gaming compacts for the purpose of authorizing certain types of gaming on Indian lands within a state. The California Constitution authorizes the Governor to negotiate and conclude compacts, subject to ratification by the Legislature. Existing law expressly ratifies a number of tribal-state gaming compacts, and amendments of tribal-state gaming compacts, between the State of California and specified Indian tribes. This bill would authorize a federally recognized Indian tribe that is not a gambling establishment or a horse racing track, or that has entered into a compact agreement with the state authorizing the operation of a satellite wagering facility, to conduct sports wagering as authorized by IGRA, pursuant to the model tribal-state sports wagering compact described below.This bill would create a model tribal-state sports wagering compact and would provide that, by the enactment of this measure, the state grants a model tribal-state sports wagering compact for the conduct of sports wagering on Indian lands to a federally recognized California Indian tribe that exercises jurisdiction over those Indian lands. The bill would provide for the tribe to adopt the authority through the signature of the tribal chief executive officer, as specified. No further action by the Governor or the state would be required in order to conduct sports wagering, but the tribe would be responsible for submitting a copy of the compact executed by the tribe to the United States Secretary of the Interior for publication of the notice of approval in the Federal Register, pursuant to IGRA.(3)The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. (4)This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as an urgency statute. Hide
SB 1390 (2011-2012) WrightSupportNo
An Act to Add Part 9 (Commencing with Section 38700) to Division 25.5 of the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Greenhouse Gas Emissions. SB 237 (2011-2012) WolkSupportNo
The California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 designates the State Air Resources Board as the state agency charged with monitoring and regulating sources of emissions of greenhouse gases. The… More
The California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 designates the State Air Resources Board as the state agency charged with monitoring and regulating sources of emissions of greenhouse gases. The state board is required to adopt a statewide greenhouse gas emissions limit equivalent to the statewide greenhouse gas emissions level in 1990 to be achieved by 2020, and to adopt rules and regulations in an open public process to achieve the maximum technologically feasible and cost-effective greenhouse gas emission reductions. The state board is authorized to adopt market-based compliance mechanisms, as defined, meeting specified requirements to be used for compliance with those regulations. This bill would establish eligible uses of funds allocated to the agricultural sector from revenue generated from market-based compliance mechanisms for the reduction of emissions of greenhouse gases pursuant to the act. The bill would require an unspecified agency to administer these funds for a specified grant program. The bill would provide for the creation of the California Agricultural Climate Benefits Advisory Committee to assist in the implementation of these requirements, as provided. Hide
An Act to Amend Sections 2827 and 2827.10 of the Public Utilities Code, Relating to Energy. SB 594 (2011-2012) WolkSupportYes
Existing law relative to private energy producers requires every electric utility, as defined, to make available to an eligible customer‑generator, as defined, a standard contract or tariff for net… More
Existing law relative to private energy producers requires every electric utility, as defined, to make available to an eligible customer‑generator, as defined, a standard contract or tariff for net energy metering on a first-come-first-served basis until the time that the total rated generating capacity used by eligible customer‑generators exceeds 5% of the electric utility’s aggregate customer peak demand. Existing law requires the electric utility, upon an affirmative election by the eligible customer-generator to receive service pursuant to this contract or tariff, to either: (1) provide net surplus electricity compensation for any net surplus electricity generated in the 12-month period, or (2) allow the eligible customer-generator to apply the net surplus electricity as a credit for kilowatthours subsequently supplied by the electric utility to the surplus customer-generator. This bill would authorize an eligible customer-generator with multiple meters to elect to aggregate the electrical load of the meters located on the property where the generation facility is located and on all property adjacent or contiguous to the property on which the generation facility is located, if those properties are solely owned, leased, or rented by the eligible customer-generator, as provided. For an electric utility that is an electrical corporation, the bill would condition this authorization upon the commission making a determination that permitting eligible customer-generators to aggregate their load from multiple meters will not result in an increase in the expected revenue obligations of customers who are not eligible customer-generators. For an electric utility that is a local publicly owned electric utility or electrical cooperative, the bill would condition this authorization upon the utility’s ratemaking authority, as defined, making a determination that permitting aggregation will not result in an increase in the expected revenue obligations of customers who are not eligible customer-generators. The bill would prohibit an eligible customer-generator that chooses to aggregate from receiving net surplus electricity compensation and require the electric utility to retain kilowatthours, as prescribed. Existing law establishes a net energy metering program that is available to an eligible fuel cell customer-generator, as defined. Existing law requires that the net metering calculation be made by measuring the difference between the electricity supplied to the eligible fuel cell customer-generator and the electricity generated by the eligible fuel cell customer-generator and fed back to the electrical grid over a 12-month period. Existing law requires that an electrical corporation determine if the eligible fuel cell customer-generator was a net consumer or producer of electricity during the 12-month period. For purposes of making this determination, existing law requires that the electrical corporation aggregate the electrical load of the eligible fuel cell customer-generator under the same ownership. This bill would require that in making the determination whether the eligible fuel cell customer-generator is a net consumer or producer of electricity during the 12-month period, the electrical corporation is to aggregate the electrical load of the meters located on the property where the eligible fuel cell electrical generation facility is located and on all property adjacent or contiguous to the property on which the facility is located, if those properties are solely owned, leased, or rented by the eligible fuel cell customer-generator. Under existing law, a violation of the Public Utilities Act or any order, decision, rule, direction, demand, or requirement of the commission is a crime. Because the bill would require an expansion of the above-described net energy metering programs and would require an order or decision of the commission to implement, a violation of these provisions would impose a state-mandated local program by expanding the definition of a crime. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. This bill would incorporate additional changes in Section 2827.10 of the Public Utilities Code, proposed by AB 2165, to be operative only if AB 2165 and this bill are both chaptered and become effective on or before January 1, 2013, and this bill is chaptered last. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 19605.73 Of, to Add Sections 19601.02, 19605.74, and 19642.1 To, and to Add Article 9.1 (Commencing with Section 19604.5) to Chapter 4 of Division 8 Of, the Business and Professions Code, Relating to Horse Racing. SB 1072 (2009-2010) CalderonSupportYes
(1)Existing law authorizes a thoroughbred association or fair, subject to approval by the California Horse Racing Board, to deduct from the parimutuel pool for any type of wager, a specified… More
(1)Existing law authorizes a thoroughbred association or fair, subject to approval by the California Horse Racing Board, to deduct from the parimutuel pool for any type of wager, a specified percentage for the meeting of the thoroughbred association or fair that accepts the wager. This bill would require every thoroughbred association or fair that conducts a live race meeting to deduct an additional 2% of the total amount handled on exotic wagers requiring the selection of 2 wagering interests, and 3% on exotic wagers requiring the selection of 3 or more wagering interests. The bill would require that these funds be distributed into the purse account of the meet conducting racing in the zones in which the wager was placed, to be used to augment overnight purses. This bill would require any thoroughbred racing association or fair that authorizes betting systems located outside of this state to accept wagers on a race to retain from the total amount received from the out-of-state betting system, less certain specified deductions made pursuant to existing law, the incremental amount received as a result of the 2% or 3% takeout on exotic wagers required by this bill, for distribution as overnight purses. This bill would require that the method utilized to determine the incremental amount received as a result of the takeout increase be established by agreement between the various affected thoroughbred racing associations and fairs, and horsemen’s organizations. If these groups are unable to agree as to the method of determining the incremental amount received, this bill would require the board to determine the allocation method after holding a hearing. For a thoroughbred association hosting the Breeders’ Cup Championship series, this bill would require the amounts collected pursuant to the above provisions requiring that 2% or 3% be deducted from the amount handled on exotic wagers be set aside for the purpose of promoting and sponsoring the Breeders’ Cup. The bill would require the thoroughbred racing association hosting the Breeders’ Cup to enter into an agreement with the organization that operates the Breeders’ Cup regarding the expenditure of the funds, as provided, and would require a written report be made to the board regarding how the funds were utilized. (2)Existing law provides that the California Horse Racing Board shall have all powers necessary to carry out the purposes of the Horse Racing Law, such as adopting rules and regulations to protect the public, allocating dates for and controlling horse racing and parimutuel wagering, and enforcing all rules and regulations. This bill would authorize exchange wagering, defined by the bill as a form of parimutuel wagering in which 2 or more persons place identically opposing wagers in a given market, provided that the entity offering exchange wagering is licensed by the board and has entered into an exchange wagering agreement between the licensee, the applicable racing association or fair conducting live racing, and the horsemen’s organization responsible for negotiated purse agreements for the breed on which exchange wagers are accepted, as provided. The bill would invest the board with the full power to prescribe rules, regulations, and conditions under which exchange wagering may be conducted in California, except that the bill would require the board to develop rules that prohibit certain persons associated with an entrant in a particular race from placing an exchange wager on a race involving that entrant, that prohibit the placing of exchange wagers on previously run races, that require the exchange wagering licensee to provide information to the person placing the wager, that prohibit the use of automatic or quick picks to place an exchange wager, and that prohibit the displaying of the results of a wager using casino themes, as provided. The bill would allow the board to recover any costs associated with the licensing and regulation of exchange wagering by imposing an assessment on the licensee. The bill would require that these funds be deposited in the Horse Racing Fund, to be available upon appropriation by the Legislature for the sole purpose of regulating exchange wagering. The bill would prohibit the taking of exchange wagers by an exchange wagering licensee prior to May 1, 2012. (3)Existing law provides that unclaimed refunds from horse racing are to be distributed to an organization that is responsible for negotiating business agreements on behalf of horsemen, to be held in trust for the purpose of negotiating an agreement with a jockeys’ organization to provide health and welfare benefits to California licensed jockeys. Existing law requires that the funds held in trust shall not exceed $450,000. Pursuant to the above provision, this bill would require each exchange wagering licensee to annually distribute the greater of $100,000, or an amount equal to 0.001 multiplied by the total amount of exchange revenue collected by the licensee in that year, to be used for the purposes specified above. (4)Existing law permits racing associations, fairs, and the organization responsible for contracting with racing associations and fairs with respect to the conduct of racing meetings, to form a private, statewide marketing organization to market and promote thoroughbred and fair horse racing, and to obtain, provide, or defray the cost of workers’ compensation coverage for stable employees and jockeys of thoroughbred trainers. Existing law requires the marketing organization to annually submit to the California Horse Racing Board a statewide marketing and promotion plan and a thoroughbred trainers’ workers’ compensation defrayal plan for thoroughbred and fair horse racing. Existing law requires 0.4% of the amount handled by each satellite wagering facility to be distributed to the marketing organization for the promotion of thoroughbred and fair horse racing, and to defray the cost of workers’ compensation insurance, as specified. Existing law repeals these provisions on January 1, 2011. This bill would extend the operation of these provisions until January 1, 2014, when they would be repealed. The bill would specify that its provisions allowing for the formation of a private statewide marketing association apply to thoroughbred racing associations, fairs, and the organization responsible for contracting with thoroughbred racing associations and fairs with respect to the conduct of racing meetings. The bill would specify that the marketing and promotion activities that the marketing organization may engage in include, but are not limited to, the establishment and maintenance of an Internet Web site, players incentive programs, and the funding of promotional activities at satellite wagering facilities. This bill would change the amount to be distributed to the marketing organization for the promotion of thoroughbred and fair racing from an amount equal to 0.4% of the amount handled at each satellite wagering facility to an amount not to exceed 0.25%, and would delete the provision allowing for the funds to be used to defray the cost of workers’ compensation coverage for stable employees and jockeys of thoroughbred trainers. The bill would require that the initial distribution be 0.2% of the total amount handled by satellite wagering facilities for thoroughbred and fair meetings only and would allow the board to adjust this amount to an aggregate of 0.25% of the total amount handled by satellite wagering facilities for thoroughbred and fair meetings only. The bill would, with respect to the statewide marketing and promotion plan, instead require the marketing organization, by November 1 of each year, to submit a written report to the board on the statewide marketing and promotion plan for the upcoming calendar year, and would additionally require the marketing organization to annually present to the board at the board’s November meeting a verbal report on the statewide marketing and promotion plan for the upcoming calendar year. The bill would delete the requirement that the marketing organization submit to the board a thoroughbred trainers’ workers’ compensation defrayal plan. The bill would also require the marketing organization to quarterly submit to the board a written report that accounts for all receipts and expenditures of the promotion funds for the previous 3 months. (5)Existing law authorizes the board, in performing its responsibilities, to participate in the affairs of associations having as their purpose the interchange of information relating to racing law enforcement, the licensing of horse racing participants, the registration of race horses, the tabulation, analysis, and publication of statistical information based on parimutuel handles and the distribution of proceeds, and to conduct research regarding horse racing accidents, and the detection of drugs on race horses, among other things. This bill would provide that, in addition to certain specified distributions, an amount not to exceed 0.05% of the total amount handled by each satellite wagering facility shall be distributed to a nonprofit organization designated by the board for the purposes of maintaining a database of horse racing information to further the purposes of the above provision. The bill would state that the amount distributable to the nonprofit organization shall initially be 0.05% of the total amount handled by each satellite wagering facility and may be adjusted by the board, in its discretion. The bill would require the nonprofit organization to submit an annual budget and file quarterly financial statements with the board. (6)By imposing new requirements under the Horse Racing Law, the violation of which would be a crime, this bill would create new crimes and would thereby impose a state-mandated local program. (7)The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide