Construction, unclassified

TopicBill numbersort iconAuthorInterest positionBecame law
An Act to Add Section 1720.9 to the Labor Code, Relating to Public Works. AB 219 (2015-2016) DalyOpposeYes
Existing law defines “public works,” for purposes of requirements regarding the payment of prevailing wages for public works projects, to include, among other things, the hauling of refuse from a… More
Existing law defines “public works,” for purposes of requirements regarding the payment of prevailing wages for public works projects, to include, among other things, the hauling of refuse from a public works site to an outside disposal location with respect to contracts involving any state agency, including the California State University and the University of California, or any political subdivision of the state. Existing law makes a willful violation of law relating to payment of prevailing wages on public works a misdemeanor. This bill would expand the definition of “public works” for these purposes to include the hauling and delivery of ready-mixed concrete, as defined, to carry out a public works contract, with respect to contracts involving any state agency or any political subdivision of the state. The bill would require the applicable prevailing wage rate to be the rate for the geographic area in which the concrete factory or batching plant is located. The bill would require the entity hauling or delivering ready-mixed concrete to enter into a written subcontract agreement with, and to provide employee payroll and time records to, the party that engaged that entity, as specified. The bill would provide that these provisions apply to public works contracts awarded on or after July 1, 2016. By expanding the definition of a crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
An Act to Amend Sections 12206, 17058, and 23610.5 of the Revenue and Taxation Code, Relating to Taxation, to Take Effect Immediately, Tax Levy. AB 35 (2015-2016) ChiuSupportNo
Existing law establishes a low-income housing tax credit program pursuant to which the California Tax Credit Allocation Committee provides procedures and requirements for the allocation of state… More
Existing law establishes a low-income housing tax credit program pursuant to which the California Tax Credit Allocation Committee provides procedures and requirements for the allocation of state insurance, personal income, and corporation income tax credit amounts among low-income housing projects based on federal law. Existing law, in modified conformity to federal income tax law, allows the credit based upon the applicable percentage, as defined, of the qualified basis of each qualified low-income building. Existing law limits the total annual amount of the credit that the committee may allocate to $70 million per year, as specified. This bill, for calendar years 2016 through 2021, inclusive, would increase the aggregate housing credit dollar amount that may be allocated among low-income housing projects by $100,000,000, as specified. The bill, under the insurance taxation law, the Personal Income Tax Law, and the Corporation Tax Law, would modify the definition of applicable percentage relating to qualified low-income buildings that meet specified criteria. This bill would incorporate additional changes to Sections 12206, 17058, and 23610.5 of the Revenue and Taxation Code proposed by SB 377 that would become operative if this bill and SB 377 are chaptered and this bill is chaptered last. This bill would take effect immediately as a tax levy. Hide
An Act to Amend Sections 27202, 27203, 27203.5, 27210, 27211, 27230, 27231, 27256, 27257, 27320, 27321, 27321.5, 27360, 66497, and 66499.7 Of, and to Repeal Section 27251 Of, the Government Code, to Amend Sections 5470, 5473.4, 5474.4, and 5474.5 of the Health and Safety Code, to Amend Sections 20150.1, 20200, 22010, 22014, 22015, 22017, 22030, 22034, 22036, 22039, 22043, and 22044 Of, and to Add Section 22042.5 To, the Public Contract Code, to Amend Sections 8333, 8335, 36627, 36705, and 36718 Of, and to Add Section 36509.5 To, the Streets and Highways Code, and to Amend Sections 35406 and 37921 of the Water Code, Relating to Local Government. SB 184 (2015-2016) SupportYes
(1)Existing law authorizes specified local entities, including cities, counties, special districts, and other authorized public corporations, to collect fees, tolls, rates, rentals, or other charges… More
(1)Existing law authorizes specified local entities, including cities, counties, special districts, and other authorized public corporations, to collect fees, tolls, rates, rentals, or other charges for water, sanitation, storm drainage, or sewerage system services and facilities. Under existing law, a local entity may collect these charges on the property tax roll at the same time and in the same manner as its general property taxes. If the entity collects these charges in this way, existing law requires the entity to prepare and file with its clerk or secretary a report describing each parcel of property receiving the above-described services and the amount charged. Existing law requires the clerk or secretary to annually file the report with the auditor. Existing law defines “clerk” for these purposes to mean the official clerk or secretary of the entity. Existing law also authorizes these local entities to fix fees or charges for the privilege of connecting parcels of property to their sanitation or sewerage facilities, subject to specified procedures. Existing law requires the legislative body of the local entity to annually file with the auditor a list of lots or parcels of land subject to these fees or charges and the amounts of the installments of the fees or charges to be entered against the affected lots or parcels of land. Existing law requires the auditor to enter on the assessment roll the amounts of installments of these fees or charges. Existing law defines the auditor, for the purposes of these provisions, as the financial officer of the local entity. This bill would instead define “clerk” to mean the clerk of the legislative body or secretary of the entity. The bill would clarify that the above-described provisions relating to the authority and duties of the auditor apply only to the county auditor. The bill would also make technical, nonsubstantive changes to these provisions. (2)Existing law requires a county recorder, upon payment of proper fees and taxes, to accept for recordation any instrument, paper, or notice that is authorized or required to be recorded, as specified. Existing law authorizes a county recorder to make marginal notations to indicate whether internal revenue stamps were affixed to specified documents. This bill would instead authorize the county recorder to make marginal notations on records as part of the recording process. Existing law requires a county recorder to keep an index of the separate property of married women, as specified. This bill would repeal this requirement. Existing law authorizes a county recorder to keep a general grantor-grantee index of specified recorded documents relating to real property transfers. This bill would authorize the recorder to combine the general grantor-grantee index in a computerized or electronic format, as provided. Existing law establishes the procedures that a county recorder is required to follow to record an instrument that is authorized by law to be recorded and deposited in the recorder’s office, including, among other requirements, that the recorder endorse upon the document the name of the person who requested its recordation. This bill would delete that endorsement requirement. Existing law requires, before a recorder accepts it for recording, a deed or instrument executed to convey fee title to real property to note across the bottom of the first page the name and address to which future tax statements may be mailed. This bill would delete the requirement that this information appear across the bottom of the page. The bill would also make technical changes to various provisions related to county recorders. (3)Existing law, the Subdivision Map Act, provides that the regulation and control of the design and improvement of subdivisions is vested in the legislative bodies of local agencies. Existing law requires that an engineer or surveyor making a survey for a final subdivision map or parcel map set sufficient durable monuments so that another engineer or surveyor may readily retrace the survey, as specified. Existing law authorizes a city or county to require a subdivider to provide a deposit to ensure the payment of various fees and services related to a final map or parcel map, including payment of the cost of setting the final monuments. Existing law requires that if an engineer or surveyor’s costs of setting final monuments are to be paid from the deposit held by the city or county, the payment be made by the city or county’s legislative body within a specified period of time. This bill would allow the legislative body to authorize any public officer or employee, as specified, to release or reduce the amount of the cash deposit to pay the engineer or surveyor for setting the final monuments. The Subdivision Map Act and local ordinances authorize or require, under specified circumstances, the furnishing of specified types of security with respect to the performance of various acts or agreements subject to the act. Existing law, until January 1, 2016, also sets forth the specific requirements imposed on a local agency for the complete or partial release of a performance security furnished by a subdivider. This bill would delete the repeal of the provisions relating to the requirements for releasing a performance security, thereby extending the operation of these provisions indefinitely and imposing a state-mandated local program. (4)Existing law, the Uniform Public Construction Cost Accounting Act (UPCCAA), establishes the California Uniform Construction Cost Accounting Commission, which is responsible for recommending, for adoption by the Controller, uniform construction cost accounting procedures for implementation by public agencies in the construction of public projects. Existing law requires the commission to consist of 14 members, including 2 members who represent school districts, one with an average daily attendance over 25,000 and one with an average daily attendance under 25,000. Existing law requires that members of the commission hold office for terms of 3 years and until their successors are appointed, and requires the Controller to appoint a replacement to fill a vacancy on the commission within 90 days after the expiration of any term. Existing law requires that each member of the commission serve without compensation, but requires them to be reimbursed for travel and other expenses, as provided. This bill would delete the requirement that the 2 members who represent school districts represent districts with an average daily attendance above and below 25,000. The bill would clarify that the Controller may reappoint members of the commission for subsequent three year terms, would authorize the Controller to appoint a successor for any commissioner after his or her 3-year term expires, and would require the Controller to fill any vacancy on the commission within 120 days, instead of 90 days, after the expiration of any term. The bill would also require reimbursement rates for travel by members of the commission to conform to the Controller’s travel guideline rates. The UPCCAA requires each participating local agency to adopt an informal bidding ordinance that, among other things, specifies the manner in which notices inviting informal bids are to be sent to a list of qualified contractors, construction trade journals, or both. This bill would clarify the requirements of that ordinance and would authorize notices inviting informal bids to be faxed or emailed to the appropriate contractors list or trade journals, as provided. The UPCCAA requires the governing body of a participating local agency to adopt plans, specifications, and working details for public projects that exceed a specified value. This bill would authorize that governing body to designate a representative to adopt those plans, specifications, and working details. The UPCCAA requires the commission to review the accounting procedures of any participating public agency if an interested party presents evidence that the work undertaken by the public agency falls within specified categories, and provides procedures by which an interested party must make a request. This bill would additionally require the commission to review practices of any participating public agency if an interested party presents evidence that the public agency is not in compliance with a specified provision of the UPCCAA and would require that this request be in writing, sent by certified or registered mail, and received by the commission, as specified. The bill would require the commission review to commence immediately and conclude 90 days from the receipt of the request for commission review. The UPCCAA requires the commission to prepare written findings after it reviews an agency’s compliance with the act or uniform cost accounting procedures, requires the public agency to present the commission’s findings to its governing body, and requires that governing body to conduct a public hearing regarding those findings within 30 days of receipt of the findings, as provided. This bill would require the commission to present the written findings to the public agency within 30 calendar days of formal commission review, would require the public agency to present the commission’s findings to the governing body of that agency within 30 calendar days receipt of written notice of the findings, and would require that governing body to hold a public hearing regarding the commission’s findings within 60 calendar days, instead of 30 days, of receiving those findings. The bill, on findings of noncompliance, would require the agency to notify its governing body of the commission’s findings within 60 calendar days of receipt of written notice of the findings from the commission, and would require the agency to notify the commission in writing, within 90 days, of the public agency’s best efforts to comply, as specified. (5)Existing law requires any county with a population of less than 500,000 to employ certain bidding procedures on public projects. Existing law authorizes every county, whether general law or charter, containing a population of less than 500,000 to participate in the UPCCAA. This bill would also authorize a county, whether general law or charter, containing a population of less than 500,000 to award individual annual contracts, as provided. (6)Existing law authorizes the legislative body of a local agency to summarily vacate a public service easement, under specified circumstances. Existing law authorizes the legislative body of a local agency to vacate street, highway, or public service easement by adopting a resolution of vacation containing specified information. This bill would authorize the legislative body of a local agency to designate any public officer or employee to summarily vacate a public service easement under the same conditions, and would authorize the legislative body of a local agency to delegate the authority to vacate a public service easement to any public officer or employee, as provided. The bill, if the resolution of vacation applies to a public service easement vacated by a public officer or employee, would also require the resolution to contain a certification that all entities having any right, title, or interest in the public service easement being vacated have been notified of this action. (7)The Parking and Business Improvement Area Law of 1989 authorizes local governmental agencies to levy assessments on businesses located and operating in a designated parking and business improvement area. The Multifamily Improvement District Law authorizes the establishment of multifamily improvement districts within a city or county to levy assessments on residential rental properties within the district for the purpose of financing certain improvements and promoting certain activities beneficial to those properties. Those laws impose certain duties upon the clerk with regard to the levy of those assessments. This bill would define “clerk” for purposes of those laws to mean the clerk of the legislative body, and would make a related conforming change. (8)Existing law authorizes a water district to execute, by its president and secretary, all contracts and other documents necessary to carry out the powers and purposes of the district. This bill would authorize the governing board of a water district to delegate to district officers and employees the power to execute contracts on the district’s behalf. (9)Existing law provides for the formation of the Paso Robles Basin Water District, and authorizes the board of directors of the district to adopt ordinances relating to the use and extraction of groundwater after noticed public hearings. Existing law authorizes the board to dispense with the notice of public hearing and adopt an emergency ordinance by the vote of at least 4 members of the board. This bill would instead require a vote of at least 7 members of the board to dispense with the notice of public hearing and adopt an emergency ordinance. (10)The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to these statutory provisions. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 11349.1.5 of the Government Code, Relating to State Government. AB 12 (2013-2014) CooleySupportNo
The Administrative Procedure Act governs the procedures for the adoption, amendment, or repeal of regulations by state agencies and for the review of those regulatory actions by the Office of… More
The Administrative Procedure Act governs the procedures for the adoption, amendment, or repeal of regulations by state agencies and for the review of those regulatory actions by the Office of Administrative Law. Existing law requires each state agency to prepare a standardized regulatory impact analysis, as specified, with respect to the adoption, amendment, or repeal of a major regulation, as defined, that is proposed on or after November 1, 2013. Existing law requires the Department of Finance and the office, from time to time, to review the standardized regulatory impact analyses for adherence to regulations adopted by the department. This bill would instead require the Department of Finance and the office to annually review the standardized regulatory impact analyses for adherence to the regulations adopted by the department. Existing law requires, on or before November 1, 2015, the office to submit to the Senate and Assembly Committees on Governmental Organization a report describing the extent to which submitted standardized regulatory impact analyses for proposed major regulations adhere to the regulations adopted by the department. This bill would instead require the office to annually prepare that report for the Senate Committee on Governmental Organization and the Assembly Committee on Accountability and Administrative Review and include recommendations for actions the Legislature might consider for improving state agency performance and compliance in the creation of the standardized regulatory impact analyses. This bill would also require the office to notify the Legislature of noncompliance by a state agency and to post the report and the notice of noncompliance on the office’s Internet Web site. Hide
An Act to Add Section 4155 to the Fish and Game Code, Relating to Fish and Wildlife. AB 1213 (2013-2014) BloomOpposeYes
Existing law enumerates the fur-bearing mammals that may be taken only with a trap, a firearm, a bow and arrow, or poison under a proper permit, or with the use of dogs, and requires every person,… More
Existing law enumerates the fur-bearing mammals that may be taken only with a trap, a firearm, a bow and arrow, or poison under a proper permit, or with the use of dogs, and requires every person, other than a fur dealer, who traps fur-bearing mammals or nongame mammals designated by the Fish and Game Commission, or who sells raw furs of those mammals, to procure a trapping license. A violation of any of the provision of the Fish and Game Code, or any rule, regulation, or order made or adopted under those provisions, is a misdemeanor, unless otherwise specified. This bill would enact the Bobcat Protection Act of 2013, which would, beginning January 1, 2014, make it unlawful to trap any bobcat, or attempt to do so, or to sell or export any bobcat or part of any bobcat taken in the area surrounding Joshua Tree National Park, as specified. The bill would require the commission to amend its regulations to prohibit the trapping of bobcats adjacent to the boundaries of each national or state park and national monument or wildlife refuge in which bobcat trapping is prohibited, as specified. The bill would require the commission, commencing January 1, 2016, to consider whether to prohibit bobcat trapping within, and adjacent to, preserves, state conservancies, and any other public or private conservation areas identified to the commission by the public as warranting protection, and to amend its regulations accordingly, as specified. The bill would prohibit the trapping of any bobcat, or attempt to do so, on any private land not belonging to the trapper without the express written consent of the owner of that property, as specified. The bill would require the commission to set trapping license fees for the 2014–15 season, and any subsequent seasons in which bobcat trapping is allowed, at the level necessary to fully recover all reasonable administrative and implementation costs of the Department of Fish and Wildlife and the commission associated with the trapping of bobcats in the state, as specified. The bill would provide that these provisions do not limit the ability of the department or the commission to impose additional requirements, restrictions, or prohibitions related to the taking of bobcats. By changing the definition of a crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
An Act to Amend Sections 44060.5, 44125, 44271, 44275, 44280, 44281, 44282, 44283, 44287, 44299.1, and 44299.2 Of, and to Repeal Section 44299 Of, the Health and Safety Code, and to Amend Sections 9250.1, 9261.1, and 9853.6 of the Vehicle Code, Relating to Vehicular Air Pollution, and Declaring the Urgency Thereof, to Take Effect Immediately. SB 11 (2013-2014) PavleySupportNo
(1)Existing law creates the enhanced fleet modernization program, administered by the Bureau of Automotive Repair in the Department of Consumer Affairs, to provide compensation for the retirement of… More
(1)Existing law creates the enhanced fleet modernization program, administered by the Bureau of Automotive Repair in the Department of Consumer Affairs, to provide compensation for the retirement of passenger vehicles, and light-duty and medium-duty trucks that are high polluters. Existing law provides that under this program compensation for retired vehicles for a low-income motor vehicle owner, as defined, is $1,500, and for all other motor vehicle owners, it is $1,000. Existing law authorizes this compensation to be increased by the department based on various factors, including the emissions benefits of the vehicle’s retirement. This bill would require the state board, in consultation with the bureau and no later than June 30, 2015, to update the guidelines for the enhanced fleet modernization program to include specified elements and to study and consider specified elements. The bill, in addition, would establish compensation for replacement vehicles for low-income vehicle owners at not less than $2,500 and would make this compensation available to an owner in addition to the compensation for a retired vehicle. The bill also would instead authorize an increase in the compensation under these programs for either retired or replacement vehicles only for low-income motor vehicle owners as necessary to balance maximizing air quality benefits of the program while ensuring participation by low-income motor vehicle owners, as specified.(2)Existing law, until January 1, 2016, increases vehicle registration fees, vessel registration fees, and specified service fees for identification plates by a specified amount. Existing law requires the revenue generated by the increase in those fees to be deposited in the Alternative and Renewable Fuel and Vehicle Technology Fund, and either the Air Quality Improvement Fund or the Enhanced Fleet Modernization Subaccount, as provided. Existing law, until January 1, 2016, imposes on certain vehicles a smog abatement fee of $20, and requires a specified amount of this fee to be deposited in the Air Quality Improvement Fund and in the Alternative and Renewable Fuel and Vehicle Technology Fund. This bill would extend those fees in the amounts required to make these deposits into the Alternative and Renewable Fuel and Vehicle Technology Fund, the Air Quality Improvement Fund, and the Enhanced Fleet Modernization Subaccount until January 1, 2024, at which time the fees would be reduced by those amounts. (3)Existing law establishes the Carl Moyer Memorial Air Quality Standards Attainment Program, which is administered by the state board, to provide grants to offset the incremental cost of eligible projects that reduce emissions of air pollutants from sources in the state and for funding a fueling infrastructure demonstration program and technology development efforts. Existing law, beginning January 1, 2015, limits the Carl Moyer program to funding projects that reduce emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx). This bill would extend the current authorization for the Carl Moyer program to fund a broader range of projects that reduce emissions until January 1, 2024, and would make other conforming changes in that regard. The bill also would delete obsolete references and make conforming changes to the Carl Moyer program.(4)Section 3 of Article XIX of the California Constitution restricts the expenditure of revenues from fees and taxes imposed by the state on vehicles to specified purposes, subject to certain exceptions. This bill would require the commission and the state board to ensure that revenues from specified fees imposed on vehicles that are used for purposes of the Alternative and Renewable Fuel and Vehicle Technology Program and the Air Quality Improvement Program are expended in compliance with Section 3 of Article XIX of the California Constitution.(5)This bill would make its provisions contingent on the enactment of AB 8 of the 2013–14 Regular Session.(6)This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as an urgency statute. Hide
An Act to Add Section 27388.1 to the Government Code, and to Add Chapter 2.5 (Commencing with Section 50470) to Part 2 of Division 31 of the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Housing, Making an Appropriation Therefor, and Declaring the Urgency Thereof, to Take Effect Immediately. SB 391 (2013-2014) DeSaulnierSupportNo
Under existing law, there are programs providing assistance for, among other things, emergency housing, multifamily housing, farmworker housing, home ownership for very low and low-income households,… More
Under existing law, there are programs providing assistance for, among other things, emergency housing, multifamily housing, farmworker housing, home ownership for very low and low-income households, and downpayment assistance for first-time homebuyers. Existing law also authorizes the issuance of bonds in specified amounts pursuant to the State General Obligation Bond Law. Existing law requires that proceeds from the sale of these bonds be used to finance various existing housing programs, capital outlay related to infill development, brownfield cleanup that promotes infill development, and housing-related parks. This bill would enact the California Homes and Jobs Act of 2013. The bill would make legislative findings and declarations relating to the need for establishing permanent, ongoing sources of funding dedicated to affordable housing development. The bill would impose a fee, except as provided, of $75 to be paid at the time of the recording of every real estate instrument, paper, or notice required or permitted by law to be recorded. By imposing new duties on counties with respect to the imposition of the recording fee, the bill would create a state-mandated local program. The bill would require that revenues from this fee be sent quarterly to the Department of Housing and Community Development for deposit in the California Homes and Jobs Trust Fund, which the bill would create within the State Treasury. The bill would provide that moneys in the fund may be expended for supporting affordable housing, administering housing programs, and the cost of periodic audits, as specified. The bill would impose certain auditing and reporting requirements. Existing law requires the Department of Industrial Relations to monitor and enforce compliance with applicable prevailing wage requirements for specified public works projects that are funded by state bond proceeds. Moneys collected for this purpose are continuously appropriated to the department from the State Public Works Enforcement Fund to cover the costs of these monitoring and enforcement duties. This bill would require the Department of Industrial Relations to monitor and enforce prevailing wage requirements for construction contracts for certain public works projects over $1,000,000, that are funded, in whole or in part, by the bill. The bill would authorize the department to charge each person or entity awarding a construction contract for the reasonable and directly related costs of the monitoring and enforcement activities, and would require the department to deposit the moneys collected into the State Public Works Enforcement Fund. The bill would exempt projects with a collective bargaining agreement with a mechanism for resolution of wage disputes from this requirement. By establishing a new source of revenue for a continuously appropriated fund, this bill would make an appropriation. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as an urgency statute. Hide
An Act to Add Chapter 5.3 (Commencing with Section 42280) to Part 3 of Division 30 of the Public Resources Code, Relating to Solid Waste. SB 405 (2013-2014) PadillaOpposeNo
Existing law, until January 1, 2020, requires an operator of a store, as defined, to establish an at-store recycling program that provides to customers the opportunity to return clean plastic… More
Existing law, until January 1, 2020, requires an operator of a store, as defined, to establish an at-store recycling program that provides to customers the opportunity to return clean plastic carryout bags to that store. With specified exceptions, this bill, as of January 1, 2015, would prohibit stores that have a specified amount of dollar sales or retail floor space from providing a single-use carryout bag to a customer. The bill, on and after July 1, 2016, would additionally impose this prohibition on convenience food stores, foodmarts, and certain other specified stores. The bill would require all of these stores to meet other specified requirements regarding providing recycled paper bags, compostable bags, or reusable grocery bags to customers.The bill would require a reusable grocery bag that a store is required to sell on and after July 1, 2016, to meet specified requirements. A violation of that requirement and the requirements that would be imposed upon grocery bag producers to submit certain laboratory test results would be subject to an administrative civil penalty assessed by the Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery. The department would be required to deposit these penalties into the Reusable Bag Account, which would be created in the Integrated Waste Management Fund, for expenditure by the department, upon appropriation by the Legislature, to implement those requirements. The bill would allow a city, county, or city and county, or the state to impose civil penalties for a violation of the bill’s requirements. The bill would require these civil penalties to be paid to the office of the city attorney, city prosecutor, district attorney, or Attorney General, whichever office brought the action, and would allow the penalties collected by the Attorney General to be expended by the Attorney General, upon appropriation by the Legislature, to enforce the bill’s provisions. The bill would provide that these remedies are not exclusive, as specified.The bill would declare that it occupies the whole field of the regulation of reusable grocery bags, single-use carryout bags, and recycled paper bags and would prohibit a local public agency, on and after January 1, 2014, from enforcing or implementing an ordinance, resolution, regulation, or rule adopted on or after September 1, 2013, relating to those bags, unless expressly authorized. The bill would allow a local public agency that has adopted such an ordinance, resolution, regulation, or rule prior to September 1, 2013, to continue to enforce and implement that ordinance, resolution, regulation, or rule, but would require any amendments to that ordinance, resolution, regulation, or rule to be subject to state preemption. Hide
An Act to Amend Sections 75, 4600, 4604.5, 4610, 4610.6, 4616, and 4660.1 of the Labor Code, Relating to Workers’ Compensation. SB 626 (2013-2014) BeallOpposeNo
Existing law establishes a worker’s compensation system, administered by the Administrative Director of the Division of Workers’ Compensation, to compensate an employee for injuries sustained in… More
Existing law establishes a worker’s compensation system, administered by the Administrative Director of the Division of Workers’ Compensation, to compensate an employee for injuries sustained in the course of his or her employment. Existing law creates the Commission on Health and Safety and Workers’ Compensation consisting of 8 voting members, that includes 4 voting members representing organized labor and 4 voting members representing employers. This bill would increase the number of commission voting members to 10 by adding one voting member representing injured workers and one additional voting member representing employers, appointed by the Governor.Existing law generally provides for the reimbursement of medical providers for services rendered in connection with the treatment of a worker’s injury. Existing law authorizes, with some exceptions, the employee to be treated by a physician of his or her own choice or at a facility of his or her own choice after 30 days from the date the injury is reported. Existing law prohibits a chiropractor from being the treating physician after the employee has received the maximum number of chiropractic visits. This bill would delete that prohibition.Existing law requires that the recommended guidelines set forth in the medical treatment utilization schedule adopted by the administrative director be presumptively correct on the issue of extent and scope of medical treatment. Notwithstanding the medical treatment utilization schedule, for injuries occurring on and after January 1, 2004, an employee is entitled to no more than 24 chiropractic, 24 occupational therapy, and 24 physical therapy visits per industrial injury.This bill would delete the limitation on chiropractic, occupational therapy, and physical therapy visits per industrial injury.Existing law requires an employer to establish a medical treatment utilization review process and, in this regard, prohibits any person other than a licensed physician from modifying, delaying, or denying requests for authorization of medical treatment for reasons of medical necessity to cure and relieve. Existing law also provides for an independent medical review process to resolve disputes over a utilization review decision for injuries occurring on or after January 1, 2013, and for any decision that is communicated to the requesting physician on or after July 1, 2013, regardless of the date of injury. This bill would revise these provisions to require that medical treatment utilization reviews and independent medical reviews be conducted by physicians or medical professionals, as applicable, who hold the same California license as the requesting physician. The bill would delete the requirement that an independent medical review organization keep the names of the reviewers confidential in all communications with entities or individuals outside the independent medical review organization. Existing law prohibits a workers’ compensation administrative law judge, the appeals board, or any higher court from making a determination of medical necessity contrary to the determination of the independent medical review organization. This bill would delete that provision. Existing law provides certain methods for determining workers’ compensation benefits payable to a worker or his or her dependents for purposes of permanent partial disability and permanent total disability for injuries occurring on or after January 1, 2013. Existing law requires that the nature of the physical injury or disfigurement, the occupation of the injured employee, and his or her age at the time of injury be taken into account in determining the percentages of permanent partial disability or permanent total disability. Existing law, with some exceptions, prohibits increases in impairment ratings for sleep dysfunction, sexual dysfunction, or psychiatric disorder, or any combination thereof, as specified. This bill would delete the prohibition on increases in impairment ratings for psychiatric disorder and would make related changes. Hide
An Act to Add Section 1782 to the Labor Code, Relating to Public Works. SB 7 (2013-2014) SteinbergSupportYes
Existing law requires that, except as specified, not less than the general prevailing rate of per diem wages, determined by the Director of Industrial Relations, be paid to workers employed on public… More
Existing law requires that, except as specified, not less than the general prevailing rate of per diem wages, determined by the Director of Industrial Relations, be paid to workers employed on public works projects. Existing law defines “public works” to include, among other things, construction, alteration, demolition, installation, or repair work done under contract and paid for, in whole or in part, out of public funds, and street, sewer, or other improvement work done under the direction and supervision or by the authority of any officer or public body of the state, or of any political subdivision or district thereof, whether the political subdivision or district operates under a freeholder’s charter or not. This bill would prohibit a charter city from receiving or using state funding or financial assistance for a construction project if the city has a charter provision or ordinance that authorizes a contractor to not comply with prevailing wage provisions on any public works contract. The bill would, except as specified, prohibit a charter city from receiving or using state funding or financial assistance for a construction project if the city has awarded, within the prior 2 years, a public works contract without requiring the contractor to comply with prevailing wage provisions. This bill would authorize charter cities to receive or use state funding or financial assistance if the city has a local prevailing wage ordinance, applicable to all of its public works contracts, that includes requirements that are equal to or greater than the state’s prevailing wage requirements, as specified. This bill would exclude contracts for projects of $25,000 or less for construction work, or projects of $15,000 or less for alteration, demolition, repair, or maintenance work. This bill would require the Director of Industrial Relations to maintain a list of charter cities that may receive and use state funding or financial assistance for their construction projects. This bill would provide that it does not restrict a charter city from receiving or using state funding or financial assistance that was awarded to the city prior to January 1, 2015, or from receiving or using state funding or financial assistance to complete a contract that was awarded prior to January 1, 2015, and that a charter city would not be disqualified from receiving or using state funding or financial assistance for its construction projects based on the city’s failure to require a contractor to comply with prevailing wage provisions in performing a contract the city advertised for bid or awarded prior to January 1, 2015. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 1773.1 of the Labor Code, Relating to Public Works. SB 776 (2013-2014) CorbettOpposeYes
Existing law defines the term “public works” for purposes of requirements regarding the payment of prevailing wages, the regulation of working hours, and the securing of workers’ compensation… More
Existing law defines the term “public works” for purposes of requirements regarding the payment of prevailing wages, the regulation of working hours, and the securing of workers’ compensation for public works projects. Existing law further requires that, except as specified, not less than the general prevailing rate of per diem wages, determined by the Director of Industrial Relations as specified, be paid to workers employed on public works projects, and imposes misdemeanor penalties for certain violations of this requirement. Under the law, employer payments are a credit against the obligation to pay the general prevailing rate of per diem wages, except credit is not granted for benefits required under state or federal law. Employer payments include the rate of contribution made by the employer to a trustee or 3rd person pursuant to a plan, fund, or program, the rate of actual costs to the employer anticipated in providing benefits to workers pursuant to a specified enforceable commitment, and payments to the California Apprenticeship Council. This bill would provide that an employer may take credit for those specified employer payments, even if those payments are not made during the same pay period for which credit is taken, if the employer regularly makes those payments on no less than a quarterly basis. This bill would prohibit credit from being granted for employer payments made to monitor and enforce laws related to public works if those payments are not required by a collective bargaining agreement. Hide
An Act to Repeal Sections 14661 and 14661.1 of the Government Code, to Amend, Repeal, and Add Section 32132.5 of the Health and Safety Code, to Amend Section 20209.14 Of, to Add and Repeal Article 6 (Commencing with Section 10187) of Chapter 1 of Part 2 of Division 2 Of, to Add and Repeal Chapter 4 (Commencing with Section 22160) of Part 3 of Division 2 Of, to Repeal Sections 20133, 20175.2, 20193, 20301.5, and 20688.6 Of, and to Repeal Article 22 (Commencing with Section 20360) of Chapter 1 of Part 3 of Division 2 Of, the Public Contract Code, to Add Section 37.2 to the San Diego Unified Port District Act (Chapter 67 of the First Extraordinary Session of the Statutes of 1962), and to Repeal Section 6 of Chapter 2 of the Second Extraordinary Session of the Statutes of 2009, Relating to Design-Build. SB 785 (2013-2014) WolkSupportYes
Existing law authorizes the Department of General Services, the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, and various local agencies to use the design-build procurement process for specified… More
Existing law authorizes the Department of General Services, the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, and various local agencies to use the design-build procurement process for specified public works under different laws. Existing law also authorizes the formation of special districts, including the Marin Healthcare District and the San Diego Unified Port District. This bill would repeal those authorizations, and enact provisions that would authorize, until January 1, 2025, the Department of General Services, the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, and those local agencies, as defined, to use the design-build procurement process for specified public works. The bill would authorize, until January 1, 2025, the Marin Healthcare District to use the design-build process when contracting for the construction of a building and improvements directly related to a hospital or health facility building at the Marin General Hospital, and would authorize the San Diego Unified Port District to use the design-build procurement process for the construction of a building or buildings and improvements directly related to the construction of a building or buildings that exceed $1,000,000. The bill would require specified information to be verified under penalty of perjury. By expanding the crime of perjury, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. This bill would make legislative findings and declarations as to the necessity of a special statute for the Marin Healthcare District and for the San Diego Unified Port District. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
AB 1210 (2011-2012) GarrickOpposeNo
AB 1518 (2011-2012) PereaSupportYes
An Act to Amend Section 12894 of the Government Code, and to Add Chapter 4.1 (Commencing with Section 39710) to Part 2 of Division 26 of the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Greenhouse Gas Emissions. AB 1532 (2011-2012) PerezOpposeYes
The California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 designates the State Air Resources Board as the state agency charged with monitoring and regulating sources of emissions of greenhouse gases. The… More
The California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 designates the State Air Resources Board as the state agency charged with monitoring and regulating sources of emissions of greenhouse gases. The state board is required to adopt a statewide greenhouse gas emissions limit equivalent to the statewide greenhouse gas emissions level in 1990 to be achieved by 2020, and to adopt rules and regulations in an open public process to achieve the maximum, technologically feasible, and cost-effective greenhouse gas emissions reductions. The act authorizes the state board to include use of market-based compliance mechanisms. Existing law imposes limitations on any link, as defined, between the state and another state, province, or country for purposes of a market-based compliance mechanism by, among other things, prohibiting any state agency, including the state board, from taking any action to create such a link unless the state agency notifies the Governor, and the Governor issues specified written findings on the proposed link that consider the advice of the Attorney General. This bill would prohibit the Governor’s written findings on the proposed link from being subject to judicial review. Existing law requires all moneys, except for fines and penalties, collected by the state board from the auction or sale of allowances as part of a market-based compliance mechanism to be deposited in the Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund and to be available upon appropriation by the Legislature. This bill would require the moneys in the Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund to be used for specified purposes. The bill would require the Department of Finance, in consultation with the state board and any other relevant state entity, to develop, as specified, a 3-year investment plan that includes specified analysis and information and to submit the plan to the Legislature, as specified. The bill would require the Department of Finance to submit a report no later than March 1, 2014, and annually thereafter, to the appropriate committees of the Legislature containing specified information. This bill would make its provisions contingent on the enactment of other legislation, as specified. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 226 Of, and to Add Article 1.5 (Commencing with Section 245) to Chapter 1 of Part 1 of Division 2 Of, the Labor Code, Relating to Employment. AB 400 (2011-2012) MaOpposeNo
Existing law authorizes employers to provide their employees paid sick leave. This bill would provide that an employee who works in California for 7 or more days in a calendar year is entitled to… More
Existing law authorizes employers to provide their employees paid sick leave. This bill would provide that an employee who works in California for 7 or more days in a calendar year is entitled to paid sick days, as defined, which shall be accrued at a rate of no less than one hour for every 30 hours worked. An employee would be entitled to use accrued sick days beginning on the 90th calendar day of employment. The bill would require employers to provide paid sick days, upon the request of the employee, for diagnosis, care, or treatment of health conditions of the employee or an employee’s family member, or for leave related to domestic violence or sexual assault. An employer would be prohibited from discriminating or retaliating against an employee who requests paid sick days. The bill would require employers to satisfy specified posting and notice and recordkeeping requirements. The bill would also make conforming changes. This bill would require the Labor Commissioner to administer and enforce these requirements, including the promulgation of regulations, investigation, mitigation, and relief of violations of these requirements. This bill would authorize the Labor Commissioner to impose specified administrative fines for violations and would authorize an aggrieved person, the commissioner, the Attorney General, or an entity a member of which is aggrieved to bring an action to recover specified civil penalties against an offender, as well as attorney’s fees, costs, and interest. The bill would specify that it does not apply to employees covered by a collective bargaining agreement that provides for paid sick days, nor does it lessen any other obligations of the employer to employees. This bill would further specify that it does not apply to employees in the construction industry covered by a collective bargaining agreement if the agreement expressly waives the requirements of this article in clear and unambiguous terms. However, the bill would specify that it applies to certain public authorities, established to deliver in-home supportive services, except where a collective bargaining agreement provides for an incremental wage increase sufficient to satisfy the bill’s requirements for accrual of sick days. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 1386 Of, and to Add Article 6.1 (Commencing with Section 1385.001) to Chapter 2.2 of Division 2 Of, the Health and Safety Code, and to Add Article 4.4 (Commencing with Section 10180.1) to Chapter 1 of Part 2 of Division 2 of the Insurance Code, Relating to Health Care Coverage. AB 52 (2011-2012) FeuerSupportNo
Existing law, the Knox-Keene Health Care Service Plan Act of 1975, provides for the licensure and regulation of health care service plans by the Department of Managed Health Care and makes a willful… More
Existing law, the Knox-Keene Health Care Service Plan Act of 1975, provides for the licensure and regulation of health care service plans by the Department of Managed Health Care and makes a willful violation of the act a crime. Existing law provides for the regulation of health insurers by the Department of Insurance. Under existing law, no change in premium rates or coverage in a health care service plan or a health insurance policy may become effective without prior written notification of the change to the contractholder or policyholder. Existing law prohibits a health care service plan or health insurer during the term of a group plan contract or policy from changing the rate of the premium, copayment, coinsurance, or deductible during specified time periods. Existing law requires a health care service plan or health insurer that issues individual or group contracts or policies to file with the Department of Managed Health Care or the Department of Insurance specified rate information at least 60 days prior to the effective date of any rate change. This bill would further require a health care service plan or health insurer that issues individual or group contracts or policies to file with the Department of Managed Health Care or the Department of Insurance, on and after January 1, 2012, a complete rate application for any proposed rate, as defined, or rate change, and would prohibit the Department of Managed Health Care or the Department of Insurance from approving any rate or rate change that is found to be excessive, inadequate, or unfairly discriminatory. The bill would require the rate application to include certain rate information. The bill would authorize the Department of Managed Health Care or the Department of Insurance to approve, deny, or modify any proposed rate or rate change, and would authorize the Department of Managed Health Care and the Department of Insurance to review any rate or rate change that went into effect between January 1, 2011, and January 1, 2012, and to order refunds, subject to these provisions. The bill would authorize the imposition of fees on health care service plans and health insurers for purposes of implementation, for deposit into newly created funds, subject to appropriation. The bill would impose civil penalties on a health care service plan or health insurer, and subject a health care service plan to discipline, for a violation of these provisions, as specified. The bill would establish proceedings for the review of any action taken under those provisions related to rate applications and would require the Department of Managed Health Care and the Department of Insurance, and plans and insurers, to disclose specified information on the Internet pertaining to rate applications and those proceedings. The bill would require the Department of Managed Health Care or the Department of Insurance, or the court, to award reasonable advocate’s fees, including expert witness fees, and other reasonable costs in those proceedings under specified circumstances, to be paid by the plan or insurer. Because a willful violation of these provisions by a health care service plan would be a crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
AB 812 (2011-2012) MaSupportYes
SB 1234 (2011-2012) De LeonSupportYes
SB 653 (2011-2012) SteinbergOpposeNo
An Act to Add Section 50406.7 to the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Housing. SB 77 (2011-2012) LenoOpposeNo
Existing law authorizes the Department of Housing and Community Development to make advance payments to eligible borrowers and grantees under certain loan or grant programs for housing, if the… More
Existing law authorizes the Department of Housing and Community Development to make advance payments to eligible borrowers and grantees under certain loan or grant programs for housing, if the department makes specified determinations. This bill would additionally authorize the department to reduce the interest rate on any loan issued by the department to a rental housing development to as low as 0% if the development meets specified requirements. Hide
SB 975 (2011-2012) WrightSupportNo
An Act to Repeal and Add Section 6432 of the Labor Code, Relating to Employment. AB 2774 (2009-2010) SwansonOpposeYes
Existing law requires an employer to provide employees with a safe workplace and authorizes the Division of Occupational Safety and Health within the Department of Industrial Relations to enforce… More
Existing law requires an employer to provide employees with a safe workplace and authorizes the Division of Occupational Safety and Health within the Department of Industrial Relations to enforce health and safety standards in places of employment and to investigate and to issue a citation and impose civil penalties when an employer commits a serious violation that causes an employee to suffer or potentially suffer, among other things, “serious injury or illness” or “serious physical harm.” This bill would establish a rebuttable presumption as to when an employer commits a serious violation of these provisions and would define serious physical harm, as specified. The bill would also establish new procedures and standards for an investigation and the determination by the division of a serious violation by an employer which causes harm or exposes an employee to the risk of harm. Hide