Broadcasting & motion pictures

TopicBill numbersort iconAuthorInterest positionBecame law
An Act to Amend Section 1708.8 Of, and to Add Section 1708.9 To, the Civil Code, Relating to Civil Law. AB 1256 (2013-2014) BloomOpposeYes
Existing law provides that a person is liable for physical invasion of privacy when the defendant knowingly enters onto the land of another person without permission or otherwise commits a trespass… More
Existing law provides that a person is liable for physical invasion of privacy when the defendant knowingly enters onto the land of another person without permission or otherwise commits a trespass in order to physically invade the privacy of the plaintiff with the intent to capture any type of visual image, sound recording, or other physical impression of the plaintiff engaging in a personal or familial activity and the physical invasion occurs in a manner that is offensive to a reasonable person. This bill would recast these provisions to instead provide that a person is liable for a physical invasion of privacy when the defendant knowingly enters onto the land of another person without permission or otherwise commits a trespass with the intent to capture any type of visual image, sound recording, or other physical impression of the plaintiff engaging in a private, personal, or familial activity and the invasion occurs in a manner that is offensive to a reasonable person. The bill would define “private, personal, or familial activity,” as specified, and provide that this definition applies to physical and constructive invasion of privacy. Existing law provides that it is a crime punishable by a fine not exceeding $500, by imprisonment in a county jail for a period of not more than 6 months, or by both that fine and imprisonment, or by a greater fine and a longer period of imprisonment if the defendant has been previously convicted of a specified violation of law, to come into any school building or upon any school grounds, without lawful business thereon, if the defendant’s presence or act interferes with the peaceful conduct of the activities of the school or disrupts the school or its pupils or school activities and the defendant remains there after being asked to leave, reenters or comes upon that place within 7 days of being asked to leave, has otherwise established a continued pattern of unauthorized entry, or willfully or knowingly creates a disruption with the intent to threaten the immediate physical safety of any pupil in preschool, kindergarten, or any of grades 1 to 8, inclusive, arriving at, attending, or leaving from school, as specified. This bill would provide that it is unlawful for any person, except a parent or guardian acting toward his or her minor child, to, by force, threat of force, or physical obstruction that is a crime of violence, intentionally injure, intimidate, interfere with, or attempt to injure, intimidate, or interfere with any person attempting to enter or exit a facility, or to, by nonviolent physical obstruction, intentionally injure, intimidate, interfere with, or attempt to injure, intimidate, or interfere with any person attempting to enter or exit a facility. The bill would define “facility” for purposes of these provisions as any public or private school grounds, or any health facility. The bill would authorize a person aggrieved by a violation of these provisions to bring a civil action to enjoin the violation, for compensatory and punitive damages, for injunctive relief, and for the cost of suit and reasonable attorney’s and expert witness’ fees, or with respect to compensatory damages, to elect, in lieu of actual damages, an award of statutory damages, as specified. The bill would also authorize the Attorney General, a district attorney, or a city attorney to bring a civil action to enjoin a violation of these provisions, for compensatory damages to persons and entities aggrieved by the violation, and for the imposition of a civil penalty, as specified. This bill would incorporate additional changes to Section 1708.8 of the Civil Code proposed by AB 2306 that would become operative if this bill and AB 2306 are both enacted and this bill is enacted last. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 6254 of the Government Code, Relating to Public Records. AB 134 (2013-2014) LogueOpposeNo
Existing law, the California Public Records Act, provides that public records are open to inspection at all times during the office hours of the state or local agency that retains those records, and… More
Existing law, the California Public Records Act, provides that public records are open to inspection at all times during the office hours of the state or local agency that retains those records, and every person has a right to inspect any public record, except as provided. However, existing law provides that nothing in the act shall be construed to require disclosure of information contained in an application for a license to carry a firearm that indicates when or where the applicant is vulnerable to attack or that concerns the applicant’s medical or psychological history or that of members of his or her family. Existing law also provides that the provisions shall not be construed to require disclosure of the home address and telephone number of prosecutors, public defenders, peace officers, judges, court commissioners, and magistrates that are set forth in applications for licenses or in licenses to carry firearms, as specified. This bill would instead provide that the California Public Records Act shall not be construed to require the disclosure of the home addresses and telephone numbers of applicants that are set forth in applications to carry firearms or of licensees that are set forth in licenses to carry firearms, as specified. This bill would also prohibit this provision from being construed as prohibiting the disclosure of public records relating to the reason an application for a license to carry a firearm was granted or denied, as specified. Because this bill would increase the duties of county sheriffs and the chiefs or other heads of police departments that issue firearms license applications, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. This bill would also make technical, nonsubstantive changes to these provisions. Existing constitutional provisions require that a statute that limits the right of access to public bodies or the writings of public officials and agencies be adopted with findings demonstrating the interest protected by the limitation and the need for protecting that interest. This bill would make legislative findings to that effect. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to these statutory provisions. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 1708.7 of the Civil Code, Relating to Stalking. AB 1356 (2013-2014) BloomOpposeYes
Existing law provides that a person is liable for the tort of stalking if he or she engaged in a pattern of conduct intended to follow, alarm, or harass the plaintiff, that resulted in the plaintiff… More
Existing law provides that a person is liable for the tort of stalking if he or she engaged in a pattern of conduct intended to follow, alarm, or harass the plaintiff, that resulted in the plaintiff reasonably fearing for his or her safety, or the safety of an immediate family member, and the defendant has either made a credible threat with the intent to place the plaintiff in reasonable fear for his or her safety, or that of an immediate family member or has violated a restraining order, as specified. This bill would include a pattern of conduct intended to place the plaintiff under surveillance within those elements defining the tort of stalking. The bill would permit the plaintiff to show, as an alternative to the plaintiff reasonably fearing for his or her safety or that of a family member, that the pattern of conduct resulted in the plaintiff suffering substantial emotional distress, and that the pattern of conduct would cause a reasonable person to suffer substantial emotional distress. The bill would require the plaintiff to show that the person has either made a credible threat with the intent to place the plaintiff in reasonable fear for his or her safety, or that of an immediate family member, or, reckless disregard for the safety of the plaintiff or that of an immediate family member. The bill would relieve the plaintiff, under exigent circumstances, as specified, of the requirement to demand that the defendant cease his or her behavior. The bill would also define the terms “follows,” “place under surveillance,” and “substantial emotional distress” for purposes of these provisions. Hide
An Act to Add Section 6401.9 to the Labor Code, Relating to Employment. AB 1576 (2013-2014) HallOpposeNo
The California Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1973 establishes certain safety and other responsibilities of employers and employees. Violations of the act under certain circumstances are a… More
The California Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1973 establishes certain safety and other responsibilities of employers and employees. Violations of the act under certain circumstances are a crime. Existing law establishes the Department of Industrial Relations to, among other things, foster, promote, and develop the welfare of the wage earners, to improve their working conditions, and to advance their opportunities for profitable employment. Existing law requires every employer to establish, implement, and maintain an effective injury prevention program. Existing law requires the program to be written, except as specified, and to include certain elements, such as the employer’s system for identifying and evaluating workplace hazards and the employer’s system for communicating with employees on occupational health and safety matters. Existing regulations require each employer having an employee with occupational exposure, defined as reasonably anticipated specified contact with blood or other potentially infectious materials that may result from the performance of an employee’s duties, to establish, implement, and maintain an effective exposure control plan designed to eliminate or minimize employee exposure. Existing regulations require, under specified circumstances, the employer to provide, at no cost to the employee, appropriate personal protective equipment that does not permit blood or other potentially infectious materials to pass through to or to reach the employee, as specified. This bill would require an adult film employer’s exposure control plan to include information that each time an employee performing in an adult film engaged in vaginal or anal intercourse, personal protective equipment was used to protect the employee from exposure to bloodborne pathogens and each employee performing in an adult film was tested for sexually transmitted infections according to specified recommendations not more than 14 days prior to filming any scene in which the employee engaged in vaginal or anal intercourse, that the employee consented to disclosing to the Division of Occupational Safety and Health that the employee was the subject of an HIV test, and that the employer paid for the test. This bill also would require an adult film employer’s exposure control plan to include any additional information as required by the Division of Occupational Safety and Health. Because a violation of the act would be a crime under certain circumstances, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program by creating a new crime. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 23036 Of, to Add Sections 38.9, 17053.95, and 23695 To, and to Repeal and Amend Section 6902.5 Of, the Revenue and Taxation Code, Relating to Taxation, to Take Effect Immediately, Tax Levy. AB 1839 (2013-2014) GattoSupportYes
The Personal Income Tax Law and the Corporation Tax Law allow various credits against the taxes imposed by those laws, including a credit against those taxes for taxable years beginning on or after… More
The Personal Income Tax Law and the Corporation Tax Law allow various credits against the taxes imposed by those laws, including a credit against those taxes for taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2011, in an amount equal to an applicable percentage of either 20% or 25%, respectively, of the qualified expenditures, as defined, attributable to the production of a qualified motion picture in California, or, where the qualified motion picture is a television series that relocated to California or is an independent film, as provided. Existing law imposes specified duties on the California Film Commission related to the administration of the credits, including a requirement to allocate the tax credits until July 1, 2017, and limits the aggregate amount of credits that may be allocated to qualified motion pictures in any fiscal year to $100,000,000 through the 2016–17 fiscal year. Existing law, for taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2011, in lieu of the credits authorized under the Personal Income Tax Law and the Corporation Tax Law for qualified motion pictures described above, also allows a credit against qualified state sales and use taxes, as provided. Existing law provides for a tentative minimum tax and further provides that, except for specified credits, no other credit shall reduce the tax imposed below the tentative minimum tax. This bill would establish similar credits under the Personal Income Tax Law and the Corporation Tax Law for taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2016, to be allocated by the California Film Commission on or after July 1, 2015, and before July 1, 2020. This bill would, as compared to the existing tax credits, extend the scope of the credits for a qualified motion picture to the applicable percentage of qualified expenditures up to $100,000,000, would extend the credit to qualified expenditures for television pilot episodes, and would determine an applicable percentage of 25% or 20% for qualified expenditures, with an additional credit amount available, as specified. This bill would limit the aggregate amount of these new credits to be allocated in each fiscal year to up to $330 million, and would, subject to a computation and ranking of applicants based on the jobs ratio, as defined, require the California Film Commission to allocate credit amounts subject to specified categories of qualified motion pictures. This bill would, for taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2016, in lieu of the credits authorized under the Personal Income Tax Law and the Corporation Tax Law for qualified motion pictures described above, allow a credit against qualified state sales and use taxes, as provided. This bill would also require the Legislative Analyst’s Office to prepare reports related to the effectiveness and administration of the qualified motion picture credit under the Sales and Use Tax Law, the Personal Income Tax Law, and the Corporation Tax Law. This bill would, for taxable years, beginning on or after January 1, 2016, additionally allow the credit under the Corporation Tax Law for qualified expenditures for the production of qualified motion pictures to reduce the tentative minimum tax. This bill would also make findings and declarations related to the entertainment industry, and would urge the United States Department of Commerce and the International Trade Commission to investigate and impose sanctions on specified motion picture productions and elements of production to combat unfair and illegal competition. Existing constitutional provisions require that a statute that limits the right of access to the meetings of public bodies or the writings of public officials and agencies be adopted with findings demonstrating the interest protected by the limitation and the need for protecting that interest. This bill would make legislative findings to that effect. The bill would state that its provisions are severable. This bill would incorporate additional changes in Section 23036 of the Revenue and Taxation Code, proposed by AB 2754, to be operative only if AB 2754 and this bill are both chaptered and become effective on or before January 1, 2015, and this bill is chaptered last. This bill would take effect immediately as a tax levy. Hide
An Act to Amend Sections 84107, 84305.5, 84510, 85704, 91000, 91005, and 91005.5 Of, and to Add Section 84503.5 To, the Government Code, Relating to the Political Reform Act of 1974. SB 2 (2013-2014) LieuOpposeNo
(1)Existing law, the Political Reform Act of 1974, provides for the comprehensive regulation of campaign financing, including requiring the reporting of campaign contributions and expenditures and… More
(1)Existing law, the Political Reform Act of 1974, provides for the comprehensive regulation of campaign financing, including requiring the reporting of campaign contributions and expenditures and imposing other reporting and recordkeeping requirements on campaign committees. The act also imposes administrative, civil, and criminal fines and penalties for violations of its provisions. This bill would increase certain administrative, civil, and criminal fines and penalties imposed by the act, as specified. (2)The act also regulates advertisements, which are defined as any general or public advertisement that is authorized and paid for by a person or committee for the purpose of supporting or opposing a candidate for elective office or a ballot measure or ballot measures. The act places certain disclosure requirements on advertisements. In addition to other penalties imposed by the act, a fine of up to triple the amount of the cost of an advertisement can be imposed on a person who violates the disclosure requirements for advertisements. This bill would require that television, video, or audio broadcast advertisements supporting or opposing a candidate or soliciting contributions in support of that purpose that are authorized by a candidate include a specified disclosure statement made by the candidate. The bill would increase the maximum penalty for a violation of these provisions to 6 times the amount of the costs of the advertisement. (3)The act regulates mass mailings, known as slate mailers, that support or oppose multiple candidates or ballot measures for an election. The act requires that each slate mailer identify the slate mailer organization or committee primarily formed to support or oppose one or more ballot measures that is sending the slate mailer, and to contain other specified information in specified formatting. The act requires that each candidate and each ballot measure that has paid to appear in the slate mailer be designated by an asterisk. This bill would additionally require that a candidate or ballot measure appearing in the slate mailer as a result of a payment made by a 3rd party be designated by an “**,” and would require the notice to voters included on a slate mailer be revised to describe this new requirement. The bill would require that a slate mailer that is produced in a language other than English provide the notice to voters in that same language. The bill would require that a slate mailer provide the notice in both English and another language if a substantial portion of a slate mailer is produced in the other language. (4)The act requires a ballot measure committee, within 30 days of designating the numerical order of propositions appearing on the ballot, to identify itself as committee for or against that numbered proposition in all required references. This bill would reduce the amount of time in which a ballot measure committee must reference itself as a committee for or against a numbered proposition to within 10 days of designating the numerical order of propositions. (5)The act makes a knowing or willful violation of its provisions a misdemeanor and subjects offenders to criminal penalties. By expanding the scope of an existing crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. (6)The Political Reform Act of 1974, an initiative measure, provides that the Legislature may amend the act to further the act’s purposes upon a 23 vote of each house and compliance with specified procedural requirements. This bill would declare that it furthers the purposes of the act. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 11414 of the Penal Code, Relating to Harassment. SB 606 (2013-2014) De LeonOpposeYes
Under existing law, any person who intentionally harasses the child or ward of any other person because of that person’s employment is guilty of a misdemeanor, punishable by imprisonment in a… More
Under existing law, any person who intentionally harasses the child or ward of any other person because of that person’s employment is guilty of a misdemeanor, punishable by imprisonment in a county jail not exceeding 6 months, or by a fine not exceeding $1,000, or both. Under existing law, that crime is punishable by mandatory imprisonment in a county jail for not less than 5 days for a 2nd conviction, and by mandatory imprisonment in a county jail for not less than 30 days for a 3rd or subsequent conviction. This bill would make a violation of the above provisions punishable by imprisonment in a county jail not exceeding one year, or by a fine not exceeding $10,000, or by both that fine and imprisonment for a first conviction. For a 2nd conviction, the bill would require a fine not exceeding $20,000 and imprisonment in a county jail for a period of not less than 5 days but not exceeding one year. For a 3rd or subsequent conviction, the bill would require a fine not exceeding $30,000 and imprisonment in a county jail for a period of not less than 30 days but not exceeding one year. The bill would specify that harassment means knowing and willful conduct directed at a specific child or ward that seriously alarms, annoys, torments, or terrorizes the child or ward, and that serves no legitimate purpose, including, but not limited to, that conduct occurring during the course of any actual or attempted recording of the child’s or ward’s image or voice without the written consent of the child’s or ward’s parent or legal guardian, by following the child’s or ward’s activities or by lying in wait. The bill would specify that, upon a violation of the above provisions, a parent or legal guardian of an aggrieved child or ward may bring a civil action against the violator on behalf of the child or ward for specified remedies. The bill would additionally provide that the act of transmitting, publishing, or broadcasting a recording of the image or voice of a child does not constitute commission of the offense. By increasing the punishment for a crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
An Act to Amend Sections 84305.5, 84504, and 84505 Of, to Add Sections 84506.1, 84506.2, and 84506.3 To, to Repeal Sections 84502, 84503, and 84506.5 Of, and to Repeal and Add Sections 84501, 84506, 84507, and 84508 Of, the Government Code, Relating to the Political Reform Act of 1974, and Calling a Special Election to Be Consolidated with the November 4, 2014, Statewide General Election, to Take Effect Immediately As an Act Calling an Election. AB 1648 (2011-2012) BrownleyOpposeNo
The Political Reform Act of 1974 regulates mass mailings, known as slate mailers, that support or oppose multiple candidates or ballot measures for an election. The act requires that each slate… More
The Political Reform Act of 1974 regulates mass mailings, known as slate mailers, that support or oppose multiple candidates or ballot measures for an election. The act requires that each slate mailer identify the slate mailer organization or committee primarily formed to support or oppose one or more ballot measures that is sending the slate mailer, and to contain other specified information in specified formatting. The act requires that each candidate and each ballot measure that has paid to appear in the slate mailer be designated by an asterisk. This bill would instead require that a candidate or ballot measure appearing in the slate mailer be designated by an asterisk if the slate mailer organization or committee primarily formed to support or oppose one or more ballot measures that is sending the slate mailer has received payment to include the candidate or ballot measure in the slate mailer. The bill would also recast the language of the prescribed notice to voters that must be included on a slate mailer. The act also regulates advertisements, which are defined as any general or public advertisement that is authorized and paid for by a person or committee for the purpose supporting or opposing a candidate for elective office or a ballot measure or ballot measures. The act places certain disclosure requirements on advertisements for or against any ballot measure, including that the advertisement disclose any person who has made cumulative contributions of $50,000 or more, as prescribed. The act places more specific disclosure requirements on broadcast or mass mailing advertisements that are paid for by independent expenditures that support or oppose a candidate or ballot measure. This bill would repeal provisions relating to disclosures for advertisements paid for by an independent expenditure and required disclosures of persons who have made cumulative contributions of $50,000 or more. This bill would, instead, impose specified disclosure requirements on radio, television, and video advertisements, and certain mass mailing and print advertisements that support or oppose a candidate or ballot measure or solicit contributions in support of those purposes. The bill would require radio, television, and video advertisements that are authorized by a candidate or agent of the candidate to include a statement in which the candidate identifies himself or herself and states that he or she approves the message, as specified. The bill would require radio, television, video, and certain mass mailings and print advertisements that are not authorized by a candidate or an agent of the candidate to disclose, in a prescribed format, the 3 largest identifiable contributors, as defined, of the committee that paid for the advertisement. The bill would require mass mailings or print advertisements that are paid for by certain persons who are not committees to disclose the name of that person as the funder of the mass mailing or print advertisement. The bill would also require that certain committees establish and maintain a committee disclosure Internet Web site, as defined, which discloses the top 10 identifiable contributors and provides a link to either the Internet Web site maintained by the Secretary of State for campaign finance disclosures of the committee, or a page on the committee disclosure Internet Web site that discloses all identifiable contributors to that committee, as specified. The bill would require these advertisements to identify the address for the committee disclosure Internet Web site. Existing law makes a knowing or willful violation of the Political Reform Act of 1974 a misdemeanor and subjects offenders to criminal penalties. This bill would impose a state-mandated local program by creating additional crimes. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.The Political Reform Act of 1974, an initiative measure, provides that the act may be amended by a statute that becomes effective upon approval of the voters.This measure would call a special statewide election to be consolidated with the statewide general election scheduled for November 4, 2014. It would provide for the submission to the voters of the provisions of this bill amending the Political Reform Act of 1974, as summarized above, at that election.This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as an act calling an election. Hide
SB 1167 (2011-2012) CalderonSupportNo
An Act to Amend Section 9016 of the Elections Code, and to Repeal Section 1 of Chapter 732 of the Statutes of 2010, Relating to Elections. SB 202 (2011-2012) HancockOpposeYes
Existing law permits the voters to propose and adopt a statute or constitutional amendment through the power of the initiative, and to approve or reject a statute or a part of a statute through the… More
Existing law permits the voters to propose and adopt a statute or constitutional amendment through the power of the initiative, and to approve or reject a statute or a part of a statute through the power of the referendum, by presenting to the Secretary of State a petition that sets forth the text of the proposed measure and is certified to have been signed by a specified number of electors. Existing law requires the Secretary of State to submit a certified initiative measure at the next general election held at least 131 days after the measure qualifies for the ballot or at any statewide special election that is held prior to that general election and is held at least 131 days after the measure qualifies for the ballot, and further requires the Secretary of State to submit a certified referendum measure at the next general election held at least 31 days after the measure qualifies for the ballot or at any statewide special election that is held prior to that general election. Under existing law, “general election” is defined to mean either the election held throughout the state on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November of each even-numbered year or any statewide election held on a regular election date, as specified. This bill would provide that, notwithstanding the above definition of “general election,” that term means, for purposes of submitting to the voters an initiative or referendum measure that is certified for the ballot on or after July 1, 2011, only the election held throughout the state on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November of each even-numbered year. Existing law requires the Secretary of State to submit ACA 4 of the 2009–10 Regular Session, a proposed legislative constitutional amendment relating to state finance, to the voters at the 2012 statewide presidential primary election, as specified. This bill would repeal those provisions and would, instead, require the Secretary of State to submit ACA 4 to the voters at the November 4, 2014, statewide general election. Hide
SB 863 (2011-2012) De LeonSupportYes