Motion picture production & distribution

TopicBill numbersort iconAuthorInterest positionBecame law
An Act to Add Sections 3017 and 3203.5 to the Public Resources Code, Relating to Oil and Gas. AB 1301 (2013-2014) BloomSupportNo
Under existing law, the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources in the Department of Conservation regulates the drilling, operation, maintenance, and abandonment of oil and gas wells in the… More
Under existing law, the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources in the Department of Conservation regulates the drilling, operation, maintenance, and abandonment of oil and gas wells in the state. The State Oil and Gas Supervisor supervises the drilling, operation, maintenance, and abandonment of wells and the operation, maintenance, and removal or abandonment of tanks and facilities related to oil and gas production within an oil and gas field regarding safety and environmental damage. Existing law requires an operator of a well, before commencing the work of drilling the well, to obtain approval from the supervisor or a district deputy. Under existing law, a person who violates any provision specific to the regulation of oil or gas operations is guilty of a misdemeanor. This bill would define “hydraulic fracturing” and would prohibit hydraulic fracturing in oil and gas operations until the Legislature enacts subsequent legislation that determines whether and under what conditions hydraulic fracturing may be conducted while protecting the public health and safety and the natural resources of the state. Because this bill would create a new crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
An Act to Add Section 6401.9 to the Labor Code, Relating to Employment. AB 1576 (2013-2014) HallOpposeNo
The California Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1973 establishes certain safety and other responsibilities of employers and employees. Violations of the act under certain circumstances are a… More
The California Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1973 establishes certain safety and other responsibilities of employers and employees. Violations of the act under certain circumstances are a crime. Existing law establishes the Department of Industrial Relations to, among other things, foster, promote, and develop the welfare of the wage earners, to improve their working conditions, and to advance their opportunities for profitable employment. Existing law requires every employer to establish, implement, and maintain an effective injury prevention program. Existing law requires the program to be written, except as specified, and to include certain elements, such as the employer’s system for identifying and evaluating workplace hazards and the employer’s system for communicating with employees on occupational health and safety matters. Existing regulations require each employer having an employee with occupational exposure, defined as reasonably anticipated specified contact with blood or other potentially infectious materials that may result from the performance of an employee’s duties, to establish, implement, and maintain an effective exposure control plan designed to eliminate or minimize employee exposure. Existing regulations require, under specified circumstances, the employer to provide, at no cost to the employee, appropriate personal protective equipment that does not permit blood or other potentially infectious materials to pass through to or to reach the employee, as specified. This bill would require an adult film employer’s exposure control plan to include information that each time an employee performing in an adult film engaged in vaginal or anal intercourse, personal protective equipment was used to protect the employee from exposure to bloodborne pathogens and each employee performing in an adult film was tested for sexually transmitted infections according to specified recommendations not more than 14 days prior to filming any scene in which the employee engaged in vaginal or anal intercourse, that the employee consented to disclosing to the Division of Occupational Safety and Health that the employee was the subject of an HIV test, and that the employer paid for the test. This bill also would require an adult film employer’s exposure control plan to include any additional information as required by the Division of Occupational Safety and Health. Because a violation of the act would be a crime under certain circumstances, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program by creating a new crime. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
An Act to Amend Sections 1798.81.5, 1798.82, and 1798.85 of the Civil Code, Relating to Personal Information Privacy. AB 1710 (2013-2014) DickinsonOpposeNo
Existing law requires a person or business conducting business in California that owns or licenses computerized data that includes personal information, as defined, to disclose, as specified, a… More
Existing law requires a person or business conducting business in California that owns or licenses computerized data that includes personal information, as defined, to disclose, as specified, a breach of the security of the system or data following discovery or notification of the security breach to any California resident whose unencrypted personal information was, or is reasonably believed to have been, acquired by an unauthorized person. Existing law also requires a person or business that maintains computerized data that includes personal information that the person or business does not own to notify the owner or licensee of the information of any breach of the security of the data immediately following discovery as specified. Existing law requires a person or business required to issue a security breach notification pursuant to these provisions to meet various requirements, including that the security breach notification provide specified information. This bill would require, if 500 or more persons are affected by the breach, that a person or business that maintains computerized data that includes personal information notify those persons of the breach of the security when a credit or debit card number was, or is reasonably believed to have been, acquired by an unauthorized person at the same time that the notice is given to the owner or licensee, as specified. The bill would authorize the owner or licensee of computerized data that includes personal information and a person or business that maintains computerized data that includes personal information to agree, pursuant to a written contractual agreement, to make the owner or licensee responsible for carrying out the notice requirement described above. With respect to the information required to be included in the notification, the bill would require, if the person or business providing the notification was the source of the breach, that person or business to offer to provide appropriate identity theft prevention and mitigation services, if any, to the affected person at no cost for not less than 12 months if the breach exposed or may have exposed specified personal information. Existing law requires a business that owns or licenses personal information about a California resident to implement and maintain reasonable security procedures and practices appropriate to the nature of the information, to protect the personal information from unauthorized access, destruction, use, modification, or disclosure. This bill would expand these provisions to businesses that own, license, or maintain personal information about a California resident, as specified. Existing law prohibits a person or entity, with specified exceptions, from publicly posting or displaying an individual’s social security number or doing certain other acts that might compromise the security of an individual’s social security number, unless otherwise required by federal or state law. This bill would also, except as specified, prohibit the sale, advertisement for sale, or offer to sell of an individual’s social security number. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 23036 Of, to Add Sections 38.9, 17053.95, and 23695 To, and to Repeal and Amend Section 6902.5 Of, the Revenue and Taxation Code, Relating to Taxation, to Take Effect Immediately, Tax Levy. AB 1839 (2013-2014) GattoSupportNo
The Personal Income Tax Law and the Corporation Tax Law allow various credits against the taxes imposed by those laws, including a credit against those taxes for taxable years beginning on or after… More
The Personal Income Tax Law and the Corporation Tax Law allow various credits against the taxes imposed by those laws, including a credit against those taxes for taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2011, in an amount equal to an applicable percentage of either 20% or 25%, respectively, of the qualified expenditures, as defined, attributable to the production of a qualified motion picture in California, or, where the qualified motion picture is a television series that relocated to California or is an independent film, as provided. Existing law imposes specified duties on the California Film Commission related to the administration of the credits, including a requirement to allocate the tax credits until July 1, 2017, and limits the aggregate amount of credits that may be allocated to qualified motion pictures in any fiscal year to $100,000,000 through the 2016–17 fiscal year. Existing law, for taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2011, in lieu of the credits authorized under the Personal Income Tax Law and the Corporation Tax Law for qualified motion pictures described above, also allows a credit against qualified state sales and use taxes, as provided. Existing law, including the Corporation Tax Law, provides for a tentative minimum tax and further provides that, except for specified credits, no other credit shall reduce the tax imposed below the tentative minimum tax. This bill would establish similar credits under the Personal Income Tax Law and the Corporation Tax Law for taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2016, to be allocated by the California Film Commission on and after January 1, 2015, and before July 1, 2021. This bill would, as compared to the existing tax credits, extend the scope of the credits for a qualified motion picture to the applicable percentage of qualified expenditures up to $100,000,000, would extend the credit to qualified expenditures for television pilot episodes, qualified expenditures for qualified visual effects, and qualified expenditures relating to music scoring and music track recording by musicians, would provide limited credit allocation priority for specified television series, and would determine an applicable percentage of 25% or 20% for qualified expenditures for television series relocating to California based on the number of years the series has received the credit since relocation to California and where in California photography occurs. This bill would limit the aggregate amount of these new credits to be allocated in each fiscal year to an unspecified amount, and would also set aside specific credit allocation amounts for each fiscal year for independent films and for television series that relocate to California. This bill would, for taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2016, in lieu of the credits authorized under the Personal Income Tax Law and the Corporation Tax Law for qualified motion pictures described above, allow a credit against qualified state sales and use taxes, as provided. This bill would also require the Legislative Analyst’s Office to prepare reports related to the effectiveness and administration of the qualified motion picture credit under the Sales and Use Tax Law, the Personal Income Tax Law, and the Corporation Tax Law. This bill would, for taxable years, beginning on or after January 1, 2016, additionally allow the credit under the Corporation Tax Law for qualified expenditures for the production of qualified motion pictures to reduce the tentative minimum tax. The bill would state that its provisions are severable. This bill would take effect immediately as a tax levy. Hide
An Act to Add Section 6720 to the Labor Code, Relating to Employment. AB 332 (2013-2014) HallOpposeNo
The California Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1973 establishes certain safety and other responsibilities of employers and employees. Violations of the act under certain circumstances are a… More
The California Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1973 establishes certain safety and other responsibilities of employers and employees. Violations of the act under certain circumstances are a crime. This bill would require an employer engaged in the production of an adult film to adopt prescribed practices and procedures to protect employees from exposure to, and infection by, sexually transmitted diseases, including engineering and work practice controls, an exposure control plan, hepatitis B vaccinations, medical monitoring, and information and training on health and safety. The bill would define terms for those purposes. The bill would require the Occupational Safety and Health Standards Board to adopt regulations to implement these provisions by January 1, 2015. Because a violation of the act would be a crime under certain circumstances, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program by creating a new crime. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
An Act to Add Chapter 5.3 (Commencing with Section 42280) to Part 3 of Division 30 of the Public Resources Code, Relating to Solid Waste. SB 405 (2013-2014) PadillaSupportNo
Existing law, until January 1, 2020, requires an operator of a store, as defined, to establish an at-store recycling program that provides to customers the opportunity to return clean plastic… More
Existing law, until January 1, 2020, requires an operator of a store, as defined, to establish an at-store recycling program that provides to customers the opportunity to return clean plastic carryout bags to that store. With specified exceptions, this bill, as of January 1, 2015, would prohibit stores that have a specified amount of dollar sales or retail floor space from providing a single-use carryout bag to a customer. The bill, on and after July 1, 2016, would additionally impose this prohibition on convenience food stores, foodmarts, and certain other specified stores. The bill would require all of these stores to meet other specified requirements regarding providing recycled paper bags, compostable bags, or reusable grocery bags to customers.The bill would require a reusable grocery bag that a store is required to sell on and after July 1, 2016, to meet specified requirements. A violation of that requirement and the requirements that would be imposed upon grocery bag producers to submit certain laboratory test results would be subject to an administrative civil penalty assessed by the Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery. The department would be required to deposit these penalties into the Reusable Bag Account, which would be created in the Integrated Waste Management Fund, for expenditure by the department, upon appropriation by the Legislature, to implement those requirements. The bill would allow a city, county, or city and county, or the state to impose civil penalties for a violation of the bill’s requirements. The bill would require these civil penalties to be paid to the office of the city attorney, city prosecutor, district attorney, or Attorney General, whichever office brought the action, and would allow the penalties collected by the Attorney General to be expended by the Attorney General, upon appropriation by the Legislature, to enforce the bill’s provisions. The bill would provide that these remedies are not exclusive, as specified.The bill would declare that it occupies the whole field of the regulation of reusable grocery bags, single-use carryout bags, and recycled paper bags and would prohibit a local public agency, on and after January 1, 2014, from enforcing or implementing an ordinance, resolution, regulation, or rule adopted on or after September 1, 2013, relating to those bags, unless expressly authorized. The bill would allow a local public agency that has adopted such an ordinance, resolution, regulation, or rule prior to September 1, 2013, to continue to enforce and implement that ordinance, resolution, regulation, or rule, but would require any amendments to that ordinance, resolution, regulation, or rule to be subject to state preemption. Hide
An Act to Amend Sections 9998.1, 9998.6, and 9998.8 Of, to Add Sections 9998.1.5, 9998.2.5, 9998.10, and 9998.11 To, and to Repeal and Add Section 9998.2 Of, the Business and Professions Code, Relating to Foreign Labor Contractors. SB 516 (2013-2014) SteinbergOpposeNo
Existing federal law permits certain aliens to engage in employment in the United States under specified conditions. Existing state law regulates the services of foreign labor contractors, as… More
Existing federal law permits certain aliens to engage in employment in the United States under specified conditions. Existing state law regulates the services of foreign labor contractors, as defined, with regard to contracts, recruitment procedures and representations, and information as to terms and conditions of employment. Existing law provides that any person who violates or induces a violation of the latter provisions is guilty of a misdemeanor. Existing law also permits any person aggrieved by a violation of these provisions to bring an action for injunctive relief or damages, or both, and authorizes recovery of damages, costs, and reasonable attorney’s fees, in an amount not less than $500, if the aggrieved person prevails on the action. Under existing state law, the Division of Labor Standards Enforcement in the Department of Industrial Relations, under the direction of the Labor Commissioner, enforces and administers the licensing and supervision of farm labor contractors, as defined. This bill would change the definition of a foreign labor contractor to mean a person who performs foreign labor contracting activity, as defined, and would require a foreign labor contractor to register with the Labor Commissioner and pay a specified fee, upon satisfying specified conditions. The bill would require the commissioner to enforce and administer the registration and supervision of foreign labor contractors, and would authorize the commissioner to adopt regulations or policies and procedures to implement these provisions. The bill would prohibit a person from knowingly entering into an agreement for the services of a foreign labor contractor that is not registered with the commissioner. The bill would also require foreign labor contractors to disclose specified information and deposit with the commissioner a surety bond in a specified amount, for payment of any amount adjudicated against the foreign labor contractor, as a condition of registration, as specified. The bill would further require persons knowingly using the services of foreign labor contractors to obtain foreign workers to disclose specified information to the commissioner. The bill would require a foreign labor contractor to disclose in writing to each foreign worker who is recruited for employment certain information, as specified. The bill would prohibit a foreign labor contractor and its agent from assessing a fee or cost to a foreign worker for foreign labor contracting activities. The bill would also prohibit charging a foreign worker with any costs or expenses not customarily assessed against similarly situated workers, and would limit the amount of housing costs charged to the foreign worker to the market rate for similar housing. The bill would prohibit requiring a foreign worker to pay any costs or expenses prior to commencement of work. The bill would prohibit additional requirements or changes to the terms of the contract originally provided to and signed by the foreign worker, unless the foreign worker is provided at least 48 hours to review and consider the additional requirements or changes, and would require the specific consent of the foreign worker, as provided, to each additional requirement or change. The bill would authorize a civil penalty for violations of these provisions, would authorize the commissioner or a person aggrieved by a violation of these provisions to bring an action for injunctive relief or damages, or both, and would authorize recovery of damages, costs, and reasonable attorney’s fees, as specified, including enforcement of liability against the bond deposited with the commissioner. The bill would exempt a person from joint and several liability for an act or omission by a foreign labor contractor if the person is using a registered foreign labor contractor’s services. The bill would also exempt a person who uses the services of a registered foreign labor contractor from misdemeanor liability for an act or omission by the foreign labor contractor. Because this bill would expand the scope of the provisions regulating foreign labor contractors, a violation of which is a misdemeanor, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 11414 of the Penal Code, Relating to Harassment. SB 606 (2013-2014) De LeonOpposeYes
Under existing law, any person who intentionally harasses the child or ward of any other person because of that person’s employment is guilty of a misdemeanor, punishable by imprisonment in a… More
Under existing law, any person who intentionally harasses the child or ward of any other person because of that person’s employment is guilty of a misdemeanor, punishable by imprisonment in a county jail not exceeding 6 months, or by a fine not exceeding $1,000, or both. Under existing law, that crime is punishable by mandatory imprisonment in a county jail for not less than 5 days for a 2nd conviction, and by mandatory imprisonment in a county jail for not less than 30 days for a 3rd or subsequent conviction. This bill would make a violation of the above provisions punishable by imprisonment in a county jail not exceeding one year, or by a fine not exceeding $10,000, or by both that fine and imprisonment for a first conviction. For a 2nd conviction, the bill would require a fine not exceeding $20,000 and imprisonment in a county jail for a period of not less than 5 days but not exceeding one year. For a 3rd or subsequent conviction, the bill would require a fine not exceeding $30,000 and imprisonment in a county jail for a period of not less than 30 days but not exceeding one year. The bill would specify that harassment means knowing and willful conduct directed at a specific child or ward that seriously alarms, annoys, torments, or terrorizes the child or ward, and that serves no legitimate purpose, including, but not limited to, that conduct occurring during the course of any actual or attempted recording of the child’s or ward’s image or voice without the written consent of the child’s or ward’s parent or legal guardian, by following the child’s or ward’s activities or by lying in wait. The bill would specify that, upon a violation of the above provisions, a parent or legal guardian of an aggrieved child or ward may bring a civil action against the violator on behalf of the child or ward for specified remedies. The bill would additionally provide that the act of transmitting, publishing, or broadcasting a recording of the image or voice of a child does not constitute commission of the offense. By increasing the punishment for a crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
AB 1069 (2011-2012) FuentesSupportYes
An Act to Amend Sections 17053.85 and 23685 Of, and to Add Section 38.7 To, the Revenue and Taxation Code, Relating to Taxation, and Declaring the Urgency Thereof, to Take Effect Immediately. AB 2026 (2011-2012) FuentesSupportYes
The Personal Income Tax Law and the Corporation Tax Law allow various credits against the taxes imposed by those laws, including a credit against those taxes for taxable years beginning on or after… More
The Personal Income Tax Law and the Corporation Tax Law allow various credits against the taxes imposed by those laws, including a credit against those taxes for taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2011, in an amount equal to a specified percentage of the qualified expenditures, as defined, attributable to the production of a qualified motion picture in California, or, where the qualified motion picture has relocated to California or is an independent film, as provided. Existing law allows specified qualified taxpayers to elect to assign the credit, requires specified information from qualified taxpayers that apply for a tax credit allocation, and imposes specified duties on the California Film Commission related to the administration of the credits, including a requirement to allocate the tax credits until July 1, 2015, and limits the aggregate amount of credits that may be allocated to qualified motion pictures in any fiscal year to $100,000,000, through the 2014–15 fiscal year. Existing law additionally allows, in lieu of the credits under the Personal Income Tax Law and the Corporation Tax Law for qualified motion pictures, a credit against qualified state sales and use taxes, as provided. This bill, under the Personal Income Tax Law and the Corporation Tax Law, would impose additional duties on the California Film Commission related to the administration of the credits and would extend the requirement to allocate the tax credits 2 additional years, until July 1, 2017. This bill would also extend the limit on the aggregate amount of credits that may be allocated through the 2016–17 fiscal year. This bill would also require assigning qualified taxpayers to provide the Franchise Tax Board with specified information, would revise the information included in an application for a tax credit allocation, and require the Legislative Analyst’s Office to prepare reports related to the effectiveness and administration of the qualified motion picture credit under the Sales and Use Tax Law, the Personal Income Tax Law, and the Corporation Tax Law. This bill would require the California Film Commission to annually post on its Internet Web site and make available for public release specified information, including a list of qualified taxpayers and the tax credit amounts allocated to each qualified taxpayer by the commission. The bill would authorize various state agencies to disclose specified taxpayer information for purposes of the Legislative Analyst’s Office report, and would impose specified criminal penalties on the disclosure of that information. By expanding the crime of knowingly and wrongfully accessing, using, or disclosing specified information, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as an urgency statute. Hide
An Act to Amend Sections 391.1, 391.2, 391.3, and 391.6 of the Code of Civil Procedure, Relating to Civil Procedure. AB 2274 (2011-2012) LaraSupportYes
Existing law provides that a defendant in any litigation pending in any court in the state may move the court, upon notice and hearing, for an order requiring the plaintiff to furnish security, based… More
Existing law provides that a defendant in any litigation pending in any court in the state may move the court, upon notice and hearing, for an order requiring the plaintiff to furnish security, based upon the ground that the plaintiff is a vexatious litigant, as defined, and has no reasonable probability of prevailing. Upon motion, existing law requires the court to consider specified evidence as may be material to the ground of the motion, but prohibits any determination made by the court to be or be deemed a determination of any issue in the litigation. Existing law requires the court to order the plaintiff to furnish security if, after hearing the evidence upon the motion, the court determines that the plaintiff is a vexatious litigant and that there is no reasonable probability that the plaintiff will prevail. Existing law provides that when a motion to require security is filed prior to trial, the litigation is stayed and the moving defendant is not required to plead until 10 days after the motion is denied or, if granted, 10 days after the required security has been furnished and the moving defendant has been given notice. Existing law provides that if a motion is filed any time after trial begins, the litigation is required to be stayed for such period after the denial of the motion or the furnishing of the required security, as determined by the court. This bill would additionally authorize a defendant to move for an order to dismiss litigation or to seek relief in the alternative, as specified. The bill would require the defendant to combine all grounds for relief in one motion. This bill would require the court to order the litigation dismissed if, after hearing evidence on the motion, the court determines the litigation has no merit. The bill would specify that these provisions would only apply to litigation filed in a court of this state by a vexatious litigant subject to a prefiling order, as specified, who was represented by counsel at the time the litigation was filed and who became in propria persona after the withdrawal of his or her attorney. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 679 of the Unemployment Insurance Code, Relating to Unemployment Insurance. AB 55 (2011-2012) GattoSupportYes
Existing unemployment insurance law requires any employing unit that is a motion picture payroll services company, as defined, to be treated as an employer of a motion picture production worker, as… More
Existing unemployment insurance law requires any employing unit that is a motion picture payroll services company, as defined, to be treated as an employer of a motion picture production worker, as defined, and to file a statement of intent with the Employment Development Department. Existing law requires any employment unit operating as a motion picture payroll services company that quits business to file with the director a final return and report of wages, as provided, and to notify the motion picture production companies and allied motion picture services of its intent to quit business, as provided. Existing law requires the employing unit’s status to be applied to its affiliated entities, as defined. Existing law requires the director to notify an entity, as provided, that does not satisfy the requirements of a motion picture payroll services company, as provided, of the facts and circumstances upon which the determination was made. Existing law authorizes the department to make a specified report to the Legislature. Existing law repeals these provisions on January 1, 2012. This bill would delete the authorization of the department to make the report and the January 1, 2012, repeal date. Hide
SB 1167 (2011-2012) CalderonSupportNo
SB 1197 (2011-2012) CalderonSupportYes
SB 550 (2011-2012) PadillaSupportYes
SB 653 (2011-2012) SteinbergOpposeNo
SB 761 (2011-2012) LowenthalOpposeNo
An Act to Add Division 115.5 (Commencing with Section 140000) to the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Health Care Coverage. SB 810 (2011-2012) LenoSupportNo
Existing law provides for the creation of various programs to provide health care services to persons who have limited incomes and meet various eligibility requirements. These programs include the… More
Existing law provides for the creation of various programs to provide health care services to persons who have limited incomes and meet various eligibility requirements. These programs include the Healthy Families Program administered by the Managed Risk Medical Insurance Board, and the Medi‑Cal program administered by the State Department of Health Care Services. Existing law provides for the regulation of health care service plans by the Department of Managed Health Care and health insurers by the Department of Insurance. Commencing January 1, 2014, the federal Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act requires every individual to be covered under minimum essential coverage, as specified, and requires every health insurance issuer issuing individual or group health insurance coverage to accept every employer and individual who applies for coverage. Existing law establishes the California Health Benefit Exchange to facilitate the purchase of qualified health plans through the Exchange by qualified individuals and small employers by January 1, 2014. This bill would establish the California Healthcare System to be administered by the newly created California Healthcare Agency under the control of a Healthcare Commissioner appointed by the Governor and subject to confirmation by the Senate. The bill would make all California residents eligible for specified health care benefits under the California Healthcare System, which would, on a single-payer basis, negotiate for or set fees for health care services provided through the system and pay claims for those services. The bill would require the commissioner to seek all necessary waivers, exemptions, agreements, or legislation to allow various existing federal, state, and local health care payments to be paid to the California Healthcare System, which would then assume responsibility for all benefits and services previously paid for with those funds. The bill would create the Healthcare Policy Board to establish policy on medical issues and various other matters relating to the system. The bill would create the Office of Patient Advocacy within the agency to represent the interests of health care consumers relative to the system. The bill would create within the agency the Office of Health Planning to plan for the health care needs of the population, and the Office of Health Care Quality, headed by a chief medical officer, to support the delivery of high-quality care and promote provider and patient satisfaction. The bill would create the Office of Inspector General for the California Healthcare System within the Attorney General’s office, which would have various oversight powers. The bill would prohibit health care service plan contracts or health insurance policies from being issued for services covered by the California Healthcare System, subject to appropriation by the Legislature, and would authorize the collection of penalty moneys for deposit into the Healthcare Fund, which the bill would create. The bill would create the Payments Board to administer the finances of the California Healthcare System. The bill would create the California Healthcare Premium Commission (Premium Commission) to determine the cost of the California Healthcare System and to develop a premium structure for the system that complies with specified standards. The bill would require the Premium Commission to recommend a premium structure to the Governor and the Legislature on or before January 1, 2014, and to make a draft recommendation to the Governor, the Legislature, and the public 90 days before submitting its final premium structure recommendation. The bill would specify that only its provisions relating to the Premium Commission would become operative on January 1, 2013, with its remaining provisions becoming operative on the earlier of the date the Secretary of California Health and Human Services notifies the Legislature, as specified, that sufficient funding exists to implement the California Healthcare System and the date the secretary receives the necessary federal waiver under the federal Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. The bill would extend the application of certain insurance fraud laws to providers of services and products under the system, thereby imposing a state-mandated local program by revising the definition of a crime. The bill would enact other related provisions relative to budgeting, regional entities, federal preemption, subrogation, collective bargaining agreements, compensation of health care providers, conflict of interest, patient grievances, and independent medical review. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
SBX1 23 (2011-2012) OpposeNo
An Act to Amend Section 6203 of the Revenue and Taxation Code, Relating to Taxation. AB 178 (2009-2010) SkinnerOpposeNo
The Sales and Use Tax Law imposes a tax on the gross receipts from the sale in this state of, or the storage, use, or other consumption in this state of, tangible personal property. That law imposes… More
The Sales and Use Tax Law imposes a tax on the gross receipts from the sale in this state of, or the storage, use, or other consumption in this state of, tangible personal property. That law imposes the sales tax upon “retailers,” and defines a “retailer engaged in business in this state” to include specified entities. Existing law also provides that every retailer engaged in business in this state and making sales of tangible personal property for storage, use, or other consumption in this state, that engages in specified activities in this state shall, at the time of sale or at the time the storage, use, or other consumption becomes taxable, collect the tax from the purchaser. This bill would include in the definition of a “retailer engaging in business in this state” a retailer entering into an agreement with a resident of this state under which the resident, for a commission or other consideration, directly or indirectly refers potential customers, whether by a link or an Internet Web site or otherwise, to the retailer, if the cumulative gross receipts or sales price from sales by the retailer to customers in this state who are referred pursuant to these agreements is in excess of $10,000 during the preceding 4 calendar quarterly periods, except as specified. Hide
An Act to Add Section 1199.6 to the Labor Code, Relating to Employment. AB 2187 (2009-2010) ArambulaOpposeNo
Existing law makes it a misdemeanor for a person or employer who, having the ability to pay, willfully refuses to pay wages due to a current employee, an employee who has resigned, or an employee who… More
Existing law makes it a misdemeanor for a person or employer who, having the ability to pay, willfully refuses to pay wages due to a current employee, an employee who has resigned, or an employee who has been discharged. Under existing law, an aggrieved employee has the right to restitution for unpaid wages. Existing law also imposes civil penalties against a person or employer who wrongfully fails to pay wages. This bill would create a separate prohibition against a person or an employer who, having the ability to pay, willfully fails to pay all wages due to an employee who has been discharged or who has quit within 90 days of the date of the wages becoming due, unless exempted, and would impose additional criminal penalties for that conduct. The bill would also require a person or employer who violates these provisions to pay restitution in an amount equal to the amount of unpaid wages to the aggrieved employee upon conviction. Because this bill would create a new crime, it would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 1708.8 of the Civil Code, and to Amend Section 23103 Of, and to Add Section 40008 To, the Vehicle Code, Relating to Stalking. AB 2479 (2009-2010) BassOpposeYes
Under existing law, a defendant who commits an assault against a plaintiff with the intent to capture any type of visual image, sound recording, or other physical impression of the plaintiff is… More
Under existing law, a defendant who commits an assault against a plaintiff with the intent to capture any type of visual image, sound recording, or other physical impression of the plaintiff is liable for up to 3 times the amount of any general and special damages that are proximately caused by this act, as well as punitive damages and a civil fine of not less than $5,000 and not more than $50,000. This bill would expand these provisions to impose liability when a defendant falsely imprisons the plaintiff with the intent to capture any type of visual image, sound recording, or other physical impression of the plaintiff. Existing law makes it a crime to willfully interfere with the driver of a vehicle or with the mechanism thereof so as to affect the driver’s control of the vehicle, to follow another vehicle more closely than is reasonable and prudent, as specified, and to engage in reckless driving, as described. This bill would make it a misdemeanor to violate any of those provisions with the intent to capture any type of visual image, sound recording, or other physical impression of another person for a commercial purpose. The bill would provide that this crime is punishable by imprisonment in a county jail and a fine of not more than $2,500, except as specified. The bill would further provide that a person who commits that act and, in addition, causes a minor to be placed in a situation in which his or her person or health is endangered is also guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by imprisonment in a county jail for not more than one year and a fine of not more than $5,000, except as specified. Because the bill would create new crimes, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
An Act to Amend Sections 350, 653h, 653s, 653u, 653w, 653z, 653aa, and 1202.4 Of, and to Add Chapter 5.8 (Commencing with Section 13849) to Title 6 of Part 4 Of, the Penal Code, Relating to Intellectual Property Piracy, and Declaring the Urgency Thereof, to Take Effect Immediately. AB 819 (2009-2010) CalderonSupportYes
Existing law makes it a crime for a person to willfully manufacture, intentionally sell, or knowingly possess for sale any counterfeit mark registered with the Secretary of State or registered on the… More
Existing law makes it a crime for a person to willfully manufacture, intentionally sell, or knowingly possess for sale any counterfeit mark registered with the Secretary of State or registered on the Principal Register of the United States Patent and Trademark Office. Existing law imposes specified imprisonment and fines based upon the number of counterfeit marks involved in the offense and if the person is an individual or a business entity. Existing law also specifies certain imprisonment and fines for a subsequent conviction of this offense and provides other specified penalties if the conduct that was the basis of the conviction has directly and foreseeably caused death or great bodily injury to another through reliance on the counterfeited item for its intended purpose. Existing law makes it a crime for a person to knowingly and willfully transfer or cause to be transferred any sounds that have been recorded on a phonograph record, disc, wire, tape, film, or other article on which sounds are recorded, with intent to sell or cause to be sold, or to use or cause to be used for commercial advantage or private financial gain through public performance, the article on which the sounds are so transferred, without the consent of the owner. Existing law specifies certain penalties for a violation of these provisions, and certain other provisions regarding the transportation of an article with the knowledge that the sounds thereon have been so transferred without the consent of the owner, if the offense involves the transfer or transportation, or conduct causing that transfer or transportation, of not less than 1,000 of the articles. Existing law also specifies certain other penalties for any other violation of these provisions and for a 2nd or subsequent conviction. Existing law makes it a crime for any person to transport or cause to be transported for monetary or other consideration within the state, any article containing sounds of a live performance with the knowledge that the sounds thereon have been recorded or mastered without the consent of the owner of the sounds of the live performance. Existing law specifies certain penalties for a violation of these provisions if the offense involves transporting or causing to be transported not less than 1,000 articles. Existing law also specifies certain other penalties for any other violation of these provisions and for a 2nd or subsequent conviction. Existing law makes it a crime for any person to record or master or cause to be recorded or mastered on any article, with the intent to sell for commercial advantage or private financial gain, the sounds of a live performance with the knowledge that the sounds thereon have been recorded or mastered without the consent of the owner of the sounds of the live performance. Existing law specifies certain penalties for a violation of these provisions if the offense involves the recording, mastering, or causing the recording or mastering of at least 1,000 articles. Existing law also specifies certain other penalties for any other violation of these provisions and for a 2nd or subsequent conviction. Existing law provides that a person is guilty of failure to disclose the origin of a recording or audiovisual work if, for commercial advantage or private financial gain, he or she knowingly advertises, sells, rents, manufactures, or possesses for those purposes, a recording or audiovisual work that does not disclose the name of the manufacturer, author, artist, performer, or producer, as specified. Failure to disclose the origin of a recording or audiovisual work is punishable by imprisonment in a county jail, imprisonment in the state prison, or a fine, or by both imprisonment and a fine, as specified, depending on the number of articles of audio recordings or audiovisual works involved, and whether the offense is a first offense, or 2nd or subsequent offense. Existing law provides that every person who operates a recording device in a motion picture theater while a motion picture is being exhibited, for the purpose of recording a theatrical motion picture and without the express written authority of the owner of the motion picture theater, is guilty of a public offense and shall be punished by imprisonment in a county jail not exceeding one year, by a fine not exceeding $2,500, or by both that fine and imprisonment. This bill would double the fines that may be imposed for a violation of any of the above provisions. Statutory law that became inoperative on January 1, 2010, provided that it was a crime, punishable by a fine not exceeding $2,500, imprisonment in a county jail for a period not exceeding one year, or by both that fine and imprisonment for a person located in California who knew that a particular recording or audiovisual work was commercial, to knowingly electronically disseminate all or substantially all of that commercial recording or audiovisual work to more than 10 other people without disclosing his or her e-mail address, and the title of the recording or audiovisual work. That statutory law also provided that a minor who violated these provisions was punishable by a fine not exceeding $250 for a first or 2nd offense and by a fine not exceeding $1,000, imprisonment in a county jail, or by both that fine and imprisonment for a 3rd or subsequent violation. This bill would again make operative those provisions and would double the fines that may be imposed for a violation of those provisions. By creating a new crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. Existing law provides that, in addition to any other penalty or fine, a court shall order any person who has been convicted of any violation of certain provisions of law relating to the transfer or transportation of misappropriated recorded music, the transportation of an article containing unauthorized recordation of sounds of live performances, the unauthorized recording of sounds of live performances, or the failure to disclose the origin of a recording or audiovisual work to make restitution to the owner or lawful producer, or trade association acting on behalf of the owner or lawful producer, of the phonograph record, disc, wire, tape, film, or other device or article from which the sound or visual images were derived that suffered economic loss resulting from the violation. Existing law provides how value is to be determined for the purpose of calculating restitution. This bill would also require a court to order restitution when the person has been convicted of violating certain other provisions of law relating to the manufacture or sale of a counterfeit registered mark and the electronic transmission of all or substantially all of a commercial recording or audiovisual work. This bill would incorporate changes to Section 653w of the Penal Code proposed by SB 830, contingent on the prior enactment of that bill. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as an urgency statute. Hide