Power plant construction & equipment

TopicBill numbersort iconAuthorInterest positionBecame law
An Act to Amend Sections 331.1 and 366.2 of the Public Utilities Code, Relating to Electricity. AB 2145 (2013-2014) BradfordOpposeNo
Under existing law, the Public Utilities Commission has regulatory authority over public utilities, including electrical corporations, as defined. The Public Utilities Act authorizes a community… More
Under existing law, the Public Utilities Commission has regulatory authority over public utilities, including electrical corporations, as defined. The Public Utilities Act authorizes a community choice aggregator, as defined, to aggregate the electrical load of interested electricity consumers within its boundaries and requires a community choice aggregator to file an implementation plan with the commission and requires that the plan include disclosures of certain information and describe other matter. The act requires a community choice aggregator to register with the commission, which may require additional information to ensure compliance with basic consumer protection rules and other procedural matters. Existing law requires that a city, county, or city and county that elects to implement a community choice aggregation program within its jurisdiction do so by ordinance, but authorizes a city, county, or city and county to request, by affirmative resolution of its governing council or board, that another entity authorized to be a community choice aggregator act as the community choice aggregator on its behalf, in which case, that other entity is responsible for adopting the ordinance to implement the community choice aggregation program on behalf of the requesting city, county, or city and county. This bill would require solicitations of customers by a community choice aggregator contain, and communication by the community choice aggregator to the public or prospective and existing customers to be consistent with, specified information and would require that the implementation plan filed by a community choice aggregator completely describe certain matter required to be disclosed under existing law. The bill would authorize the commission to require that a community choice aggregator, when registering with the commission, provide additional information to ensure compliance with basic consumer protection and other rules and other procedural matters. If a city, county, or city and county requests another entity that is authorized to be a community choice aggregator to act as the community choice aggregator on its behalf, the bill would require that the entity that is to be the community choice aggregator be in a county that is contiguous to the requesting city, county, or city and county. The bill would provide that, beginning January 1, 2015, no entity may enact an ordinance to serve as the community choice aggregator in more than 3-contiguous-counties, but may serve as the community choice aggregator for any city, county, or city and county that is outside a 3-contiguous-county area, for which it adopted an ordinance prior to January 1, 2015. The bill would make other technical, nonsubstantive revisions to the community choice aggregator provisions. The Joint Exercise of Powers Act authorizes the legislative or other governing bodies of 2 or more public agencies to jointly exercise by agreement any power common to the contracting parties, as specified. Existing law authorizes any group of cities, counties, or cities and counties whose governing boards have so elected to combine the loads of their programs as a community choice aggregator through the formation of a joint powers agency established pursuant to the Joint Exercise of Powers Act. This bill would prohibit a joint powers agency formed to provide electric service as a community choice aggregator from exceeding the geographical boundaries of 3-contiguous-counties, but would provide that this limitation does not apply where an ordinance authorizing community choice aggregation outside the 3-contiguous-counties was adopted prior to January 1, 2015. Under existing law, a violation of the Public Utilities Act or any order, decision, rule, direction, demand, or requirement of the commission is a crime. Because the bill would impose requirements regarding a community choice aggregator, a violation of which would be a crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
An Act to Add Section 2817 to the Public Utilities Code, Relating to Public Utilities. AB 2649 (2013-2014) MullinSupportNo
Existing law vests the Public Utilities Commission with regulatory authority over public utilities, including electrical corporations. Pursuant to its existing authority, the commission issued… More
Existing law vests the Public Utilities Commission with regulatory authority over public utilities, including electrical corporations. Pursuant to its existing authority, the commission issued Electrical Rule 21 establishing operational and metering requirements for a generation facility to be connected to an electrical corporation’s distribution system. Existing law relative to private energy producers requires every electric utility, as defined, to develop a standard contract or tariff providing for net energy metering, as defined, and to make this contract or tariff available to eligible customer-generators, as defined, upon request for generation by a renewable electrical generation facility, as defined. The existing definition of an eligible customer-generator requires that the generating facility use a renewable source of energy, as specified, and have a generating capacity of not more than one megawatt. Existing law requires that every electric utility ensure that requests for an interconnection agreement from an eligible customer-generator are processed in a time period not to exceed 30 working days from the date it receives a completed application form from the eligible customer-generator for an interconnection agreement. This bill would require the commission to determine criteria that would allow an independent generation facility, as defined, to apply for interconnection to the utility electric distribution grid under the fast track review process, as defined under Rule 21.Under existing law, a violation of an order, rule, direction, demand, or requirement of the commission is a crime. Because a failure of an electric utility to process an interconnection request from an independent generation facility pursuant to Rule 21 would be a crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
An Act to Amend Sections 84303, 89519, 90002, 90003, 90004, and 90005 Of, and to Add Sections 90008 and 90009 To, the Government Code, Relating to the Political Reform Act of 1974, and Declaring the Urgency Thereof, to Take Effect Immediately. AB 800 (2013-2014) GordonSupportYes
(1)The Political Reform Act of 1974 prohibits an agent or independent contractor from making an expenditure of $500 or more, other than overhead or normal operating expenses, on behalf of or for the… More
(1)The Political Reform Act of 1974 prohibits an agent or independent contractor from making an expenditure of $500 or more, other than overhead or normal operating expenses, on behalf of or for the benefit of any candidate or committee unless it is reported by the candidate or committee as if the expenditure were made directly by the candidate or committee. The act requires an agent or independent contractor to make known to the candidate or committee all information subject to this reporting requirement. This bill, in addition, would require a subagent or subcontractor who provides goods or services to or for the benefit of a candidate or committee to make known to the agent or independent contractor all of the information subject to the reporting requirement described above, and would require that disclosure of this information by a subagent or subcontractor to the agent or independent contractor or by the agent or independent contractor to the candidate or committee occur no later than three working days prior to the time the campaign statement reporting the expenditure is required to be filed, except that an expenditure that is required to be reported as a late contribution or late independent expenditure must be reported to the candidate or committee within 24 hours of the time that it is made. (2)The act defines as “surplus campaign funds” campaign funds that are under the control of a former candidate or former elected officer as of the date of leaving elective office or the end of the postelection reporting period following the defeat of the candidate for elective office, whichever occurs last. The act restricts the purposes for which surplus campaign funds may be expended. This bill would increase the time at which campaign funds become surplus campaign funds by 90 days following either the officer leaving elective office or the end of the postelection reporting period following the defeat of a candidate, whichever occurs last. (3)The act requires the Franchise Tax Board to conduct audits and field investigations of various financial statements required to be submitted by lobbying firms, lobbyist employers, candidates, and specified committees. The act prohibits the commencement of an audit or investigation of a candidate, controlled committee, or committee primarily supporting or opposing a candidate or a measure in connection with a report or statement required by specified provisions of the act until after the last date for filing the first report or statement following the general, runoff, or special election for the office for which the candidate ran, or following the election at which the measure was adopted or defeated, except as provided. The act prescribes the scope of campaign statements and reports to be included in audits and investigations of candidates, controlled committees, or committees primarily supporting or opposing a candidate or a measure. This bill would delete these provisions that delay the commencement of an audit or investigation and prescribe the scope of audits and investigations. In addition to the general auditing requirements imposed on the Franchise Tax Board as described above, the act authorizes the Franchise Tax Board and the Fair Political Practices Commission to make investigations and audits with respect to any reports or statements required by specified provisions of the act regarding campaign disclosure, limitations on contributions, and lobbyists. This bill would expand this authority to allow the Franchise Tax Board and the Fair Political Practices Commission to make investigations and audits with respect to any reports or statements required under the act. The act requires the Franchise Tax Board periodically to prepare reports regarding its audit and investigations under the act and send them to the Commission, the Secretary of State, and the Attorney General. The act requires the board to complete its report of any audit conducted on a random basis pursuant to a specified statute within one year after the person or entity subject to the audit is selected by the Commission to be audited. This bill would extend the deadline for the Franchise Tax Board to complete its report of an audit conducted on a random basis from one to two years after the person or entity to be audited is selected by the Fair Political Practices Commission. The act prohibits a member, employee, or agent of the Franchise Tax Board from divulging or making known in any manner any particulars of any record, documents, or information which he or she receives by virtue of conducting audits and investigations, except as provided. This bill, in addition, would make this prohibition applicable to a member, employee, or agent of the Fair Political Practices Commission. This bill would authorize the Fair Political Practices Commission, and the Franchise Tax Board at the direction of the Commission, to audit any record required to be maintained under the act in order to ensure compliance with the act prior to an election, even if the record is a report or statement that has not yet been filed. The bill would authorize the Commission to seek injunctive relief in a superior court to compel disclosure consistent with the act, and would require a court to grant expedited review of an action filed pursuant to this provision, as specified. (4)Existing law makes a knowing or willful violation of the Political Reform Act of 1974 a misdemeanor and subjects offenders to criminal penalties. This bill would impose a state-mandated local program by creating additional crimes. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. (5)The Political Reform Act of 1974, an initiative measure, provides that the Legislature may amend the act to further the act’s purposes upon a 23 vote of each house and compliance with specified procedural requirements. This bill would declare that it furthers the purposes of the act. (6)This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as an urgency statute. The bill would delay the operative date of its provisions until July 1, 2014. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 379.6 of the Public Utilities Code, Relating to Electricity. AB 1150 (2011-2012) PerezSupportYes
Under existing law, the Public Utilities Commission (PUC) has regulatory authority over public utilities, including electrical corporations, as defined. Existing law requires the PUC to administer,… More
Under existing law, the Public Utilities Commission (PUC) has regulatory authority over public utilities, including electrical corporations, as defined. Existing law requires the PUC to administer, until January 1, 2016, a self-generation incentive program (SGIP) for distributed generation resources and to separately administer solar technologies pursuant to the California Solar Initiative. The PUC, in consultation with the State Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission (Energy Commission), may authorize electrical corporations to annually collect not more than the amount authorized for the SGIP in the 2008 calendar year through December 31, 2011. This bill would extend the authority of the PUC to authorize electrical corporations to continue making the annual collections through December 31, 2014. Under existing law, a violation of the Public Utilities Act or any order, decision, rule, direction, demand, or requirement of the commission is a crime. Because the program that is extended under the provisions of this bill are within the act and a decision or order of the commission implements the program requirements, a violation of these provisions would impose a state-mandated local program by expanding the definition of a crime. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 9620 Of, and to Add Chapter 7.7 (Commencing with Section 2835) to Part 2 of Division 1 Of, the Public Utilities Code, Relating to Energy. AB 2514 (2009-2010) SkinnerSupportYes
Under existing law, the Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) has regulatory authority over public utilities, including electrical corporations, as defined. The existing Public Utilities Act requires… More
Under existing law, the Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) has regulatory authority over public utilities, including electrical corporations, as defined. The existing Public Utilities Act requires the CPUC to review and adopt a procurement plan for each electrical corporation in accordance with specified elements, incentive mechanisms, and objectives. The existing California Renewables Portfolio Standard Program (RPS program) requires the CPUC to implement annual procurement targets for the procurement of eligible renewable energy resources, as defined, for all retail sellers, including electrical corporations, community choice aggregators, and electric service providers, but not including local publicly owned electric utilities, to achieve the targets and goals of the program. The existing Warren-Alquist State Energy Resources Conservation and Development Act establishes the State Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission (Energy Commission), and requires it to undertake a continuing assessment of trends in the consumption of electricity and other forms of energy and to analyze the social, economic, and environmental consequences of those trends and to collect from electric utilities, gas utilities, and fuel producers and wholesalers and other sources, forecasts of future supplies and consumption of all forms of energy. Existing law requires the CPUC, in consultation with the Independent System Operator (ISO), to establish resource adequacy requirements for all load-serving entities, as defined, in accordance with specified objectives. The definition of a “load-serving entity” excludes a local publicly owned electric utility. That law further requires each load-serving entity to maintain physical generating capacity adequate to meet its load requirements, including peak demand and planning and operating reserves, deliverable to locations and at times as may be necessary to provide reliable electric service. Other existing law requires that each local publicly owned electric utility serving end-use customers to prudently plan for and procure resources that are adequate to meet its planning reserve margin and peak demand and operating reserves, sufficient to provide reliable electric service to its customers. That law additionally requires the utility, upon request, to provide the Energy Commission with any information the Energy Commission determines is necessary to evaluate the progress made by the local publicly owned electric utility in meeting those planning requirements, and requires the Energy Commission to report the progress made by each utility to the Legislature, to be included in the integrated energy policy reports. Under existing law, the governing body of a local publicly owned electric utility is responsible for implementing and enforcing a renewables portfolio standard for the utility that recognizes the intent of the Legislature to encourage renewable resources, while taking into consideration the effect of the standard on rates, reliability, and financial resources and the goal of environmental improvement. This bill would require the CPUC, by March 1, 2012, to open a proceeding to determine appropriate targets, if any, for each load-serving entity to procure viable and cost-effective energy storage systems and, by October 1, 2013, to adopt an energy storage system procurement target, if determined to be appropriate, to be achieved by each load-serving entity by December 31, 2015, and a 2nd target to be achieved by December 31, 2020. The bill would require the governing board of a local publicly owned electric utility, by March 1, 2012, to open a proceeding to determine appropriate targets, if any, for the utility to procure viable and cost-effective energy storage systems and, by October 1, 2014, to adopt an energy storage system procurement target, if determined to be appropriate, to be achieved by the utility by December 31, 2016, and a 2nd target to be achieved by December 31, 2021. The bill would require each load-serving entity and local publicly owned electric utility to report certain information to the CPUC, for a load-serving entity, or to the Energy Commission, for a local publicly owned electric utility. The bill would make other technical, nonsubstantive revisions to existing law. The bill would exempt from these requirements an electrical corporation that has 60,000 or fewer customers within California and a public utility district that receives all of its electricity pursuant to a preference right adopted and authorized by the United States Congress pursuant to a specified law. Under existing law, a violation of the Public Utilities Act or any order, decision, rule, direction, demand, or requirement of the CPUC is a crime. Because certain of the provisions of this bill require action by the CPUC to implement, a violation of these provisions would impose a state-mandated local program by creating a new crime. Because certain of the bill’s requirements are applicable to local publicly owned electric utilities, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for specified reasons. Hide