Food & kindred products manufacturing

TopicBill numbersort iconAuthorInterest positionBecame law
An Act to Amend Section 1182.12 of the Labor Code, Relating to Wages. AB 10 (2013-2014) AlejoOpposeYes
Existing law requires that, on and after January 1, 2008, the minimum wage for all industries be not less than $8.00 per hour. This bill would increase the minimum wage, on and after July 1, 2014, to… More
Existing law requires that, on and after January 1, 2008, the minimum wage for all industries be not less than $8.00 per hour. This bill would increase the minimum wage, on and after July 1, 2014, to not less than $9 per hour. The bill would further increase the minimum wage, on and after January 1, 2016, to not less than $10 per hour. Hide
An Act to Add Sections 3017 and 3203.5 to the Public Resources Code, Relating to Oil and Gas. AB 1301 (2013-2014) BloomOpposeNo
Under existing law, the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources in the Department of Conservation regulates the drilling, operation, maintenance, and abandonment of oil and gas wells in the… More
Under existing law, the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources in the Department of Conservation regulates the drilling, operation, maintenance, and abandonment of oil and gas wells in the state. The State Oil and Gas Supervisor supervises the drilling, operation, maintenance, and abandonment of wells and the operation, maintenance, and removal or abandonment of tanks and facilities related to oil and gas production within an oil and gas field regarding safety and environmental damage. Existing law requires an operator of a well, before commencing the work of drilling the well, to obtain approval from the supervisor or a district deputy. Under existing law, a person who violates any provision specific to the regulation of oil or gas operations is guilty of a misdemeanor. This bill would define “hydraulic fracturing” and would prohibit hydraulic fracturing in oil and gas operations until the Legislature enacts subsequent legislation that determines whether and under what conditions hydraulic fracturing may be conducted while protecting the public health and safety and the natural resources of the state. Because this bill would create a new crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
An Act to Add Sections 3017 and 3203.5 to the Public Resources Code, Relating to Oil and Gas. AB 1323 (2013-2014) MitchellOpposeNo
Under existing law, the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources in the Department of Conservation regulates the drilling, operation, maintenance, and abandonment of oil and gas wells in the… More
Under existing law, the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources in the Department of Conservation regulates the drilling, operation, maintenance, and abandonment of oil and gas wells in the state. The State Oil and Gas Supervisor supervises the drilling, operation, maintenance, and abandonment of wells and the operation, maintenance, and removal or abandonment of tanks and facilities related to oil and gas production within an oil and gas field regarding safety and environmental damage. Existing law requires an operator of a well, before commencing the work of drilling the well, to obtain approval from the supervisor or a district deputy. Violation of these provisions is a misdemeanor. This bill would define “hydraulic fracturing” in oil and gas operations and would prohibit hydraulic fracturing until the date that regulations adopted by the division regulating hydraulic fracturing take effect. Because a violation of this prohibition is a crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
An Act to Add Chapter 4.6 (Commencing with Section 19060) to Part 3 of Division 9 of the Food and Agriculture Code, Relating to Medically Important Antimicrobials. AB 1437 (2013-2014) MullinSupportNo
Under existing law, the Department of Food and Agriculture is responsible for enforcing provisions relating to the importation of animals, milk and milk products, produce dealers, and other… More
Under existing law, the Department of Food and Agriculture is responsible for enforcing provisions relating to the importation of animals, milk and milk products, produce dealers, and other agricultural regulations. Existing law, the California Meat and Poultry Inspection Act, establishes a meat and poultry inspection program and, in connection with the operation of that program by the department, authorizes the Secretary of Food and Agriculture to adopt, by regulation, standards and requirements that meet those prescribed by the Federal Meat Inspection Act and the Federal Poultry Products Inspection Act.This bill would prohibit a livestock or poultry product from being sold in California if the livestock or poultry product is constituted of livestock or poultry that was administered a medically important antimicrobial for nontherapeutic use, such as growth promotion, feed efficiency, weight gain, or disease prevention. The bill would also prohibit a livestock or poultry product sold in California to be constituted of livestock or poultry that was administered a medically important antimicrobial for nonroutine disease control unless certain conditions are met. The bill would prohibit a livestock or poultry product from being sold in California unless the livestock or poultry product is constituted wholly or in part of livestock or poultry that was slaughtered at a registered slaughter facility and the slaughter facility annually reports specified information to the department regarding the use of medically important antimicrobials. The bill would also prohibit a medically important antimicrobial from being administered to a food-producing animal unless the medically important antimicrobial is administered for a therapeutic use and consistently with specified veterinarian provisions. The bill would require the department to establish, by regulation, a schedule for the implementation of these provisions and require that they be fully implemented on or before on January 1, 2020. The bill would require the department to post the information reported by the slaughter facilities on an Internet Web site commencing on or before December 31, 2017. This bill would require the department to adopt any regulations necessary to implement the provisions of the bill. Hide
An Act to Add Chapter 5.9 (Commencing with Section 42360) to Part 3 of Division 30 of the Public Resources Code, Relating to Waste Management. AB 1699 (2013-2014) BloomOpposeNo
The Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986 (Proposition 65) prohibits any person, in the course of doing business, from knowingly and intentionally exposing any individual to a… More
The Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986 (Proposition 65) prohibits any person, in the course of doing business, from knowingly and intentionally exposing any individual to a chemical known to the state to cause cancer or reproductive toxicity without giving a specified warning, or from discharging or releasing such a chemical into any source of drinking water, except as specified. Existing law prohibits the sale of expanded polystyrene packaging material by a wholesaler or manufacturer. Existing law prohibits a person from selling a plastic product in this state that is labeled with the term “compostable,” “home compostable,” or “marine degradable” unless, at the time of sale, the plastic product meets the applicable American Society for Testing and Materials standard specification. This bill would prohibit, after January 1, 2019, a person, as defined, from selling or offering for promotional purposes in this state a personal care product containing synthetic plastic microbeads, as specified, unless the personal care product is an over-the-counter drug, and would prohibit a person, after January 1, 2020, from selling or offering a personal care product containing synthetic plastic microbeads, including a personal care product that is an over-the-counter drug. The bill would exempt from those prohibitions the sale or promotional offer of a product containing less than 1 part per million (ppm) by weight of synthetic plastic microbeads, as provided. The bill would make a violator liable for a civil penalty not to exceed $2,500 per day for each violation. The bill would authorize the penalty to be assessed and recovered in a civil action brought in any court of competent jurisdiction by the Attorney General or local officials, as provided. The bill would require the civil penalties collected in an action brought pursuant to the act to be retained by the office of the Attorney General or local official who brought the action. The bill would declare that its provisions occupy the whole field of regulation of the sale or offering for promotional purposes of personal care products containing synthetic plastic microbeads. The bill would prohibit a city, county, or other local public agency, on or after January 1, 2019, from adopting, enforcing, or otherwise implementing, an ordinance, resolution, regulation, or rule, or any amendment thereto, relating to the sale or offering for promotional purposes of personal care products that are not over-the-counter drugs and that contain synthetic plastic microbeads, and would prohibit a city, county, or other local public agency from taking similar actions, on or after January 1, 2020, relating to the sale or offering for promotional purposes of personal care products, including, but not limited to, over-the-counter drugs, that contain synthetic plastic microbeads, except as expressly authorized. Hide
An Act to Amend Sections 65352 and 65352.5 Of, and to Add Section 65350.5 To, the Government Code, and to Amend Sections 348, 1120, 1552, 1831, 10721, 10726.4, and 10726.8 Of, to Add Sections 1529.5 and 10726.9 To, to Add Part 5.2 (Commencing with Section 5200) to Division 2 Of, and to Add Chapter 7 (Commencing with Section 10729), Chapter 8 (Commencing with Section 10730), Chapter 9 (Commencing with Section 10732), Chapter 10 (Commencing with Section 10733), and Chapter 11 (Commencing with Section 10735) to Part 2.74 of Division 6 Of, the Water Code, Relating to Groundwater. AB 1739 (2013-2014) DickinsonOpposeNo
(1)Existing law authorizes local agencies to adopt and implement a groundwater management plan. Existing law requires a groundwater management plan to contain specified components and requires a… More
(1)Existing law authorizes local agencies to adopt and implement a groundwater management plan. Existing law requires a groundwater management plan to contain specified components and requires a local agency seeking state funds administered by the Department of Water Resources for groundwater projects or groundwater quality projects to do certain things, including, but not limited to, preparing and implementing a groundwater management plan that includes basin management objectives for the groundwater basin. This bill would provide specific authority to a groundwater sustainability agency, as defined in SB 1168 of the 2013–14 Regular Session, to impose certain fees. The bill would authorize the department or a groundwater sustainability agency to provide technical assistance to entities that extract or use groundwater to promote water conservation and protect groundwater resources. This bill would require the department, by January 1, 2017, to publish on its Internet Web site best management practices for the sustainable management of groundwater, and would require the department to prepare and release a report by December 31, 2016, on the department’s best estimate of water available for replenishment of groundwater in the state. This bill would require a groundwater sustainability agency to submit a groundwater sustainability plan to the department for review upon adoption. This bill would require the department to periodically review groundwater sustainability plans, and by June 1, 2016, would require the department to adopt certain regulations. This bill would authorize a local agency to submit to the department for evaluation and assessment an alternative that the local agency believes satisfies the objectives of these provisions. This bill would require the department to review any of the above-described submissions at least every 5 years after initial submission to the department. This bill would authorize the board to conduct inspections and would authorize the board to obtain an inspection warrant. Because the willful refusal of an inspection lawfully authorized by an inspection warrant is a misdemeanor, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program by expanding the application of a crime. This bill would authorize the board to designate a basin as a probationary basin if the board makes a certain determination. This bill would authorize the board to develop an interim plan for a probationary basin if the board, in consultation with the department, determines that a local agency has not remedied a deficiency that resulted in designating the basin as a probationary basin within a certain timeframe. This bill would authorize the board to adopt an interim plan for a probationary basin after notice and a public hearing and would require state entities to comply with an interim plan. This bill would specifically authorize the board to rescind all or a portion of an interim plan if the board determines at the request of specified petitioners that a groundwater sustainability plan or adjudication action is adequate to eliminate the condition of long-term overdraft or condition where groundwater extractions result in significant depletions of interconnected surface waters. This bill would provide that the board has authority to stay its proceedings relating to an interim plan or to rescind or amend an interim plan based on the progress made by a groundwater sustainability agency or in an adjudication action. (2)Existing law establishes the Water Rights Fund, which consists of various fees and penalties. The moneys in the Water Rights Fund are available, upon appropriation by the Legislature, for, among other things, the administration of the State Water Resource Control Board’s water rights program. This bill would provide that the moneys in the Water Rights Fund are available for expenditure, upon appropriation by the Legislature, for the purpose of state board enforcement of the provisions of this bill. This bill would require the board to adopt a schedule of fees in an amount sufficient to recover all costs incurred and expended from the Water Rights Fund by the board for this bill. Under existing law, a person who violates a cease and desist order of the board may be liable in an amount not to exceed $1,000 for each day in which the violation occurs. Revenue generated from these penalties is deposited in the Water Rights Fund. This bill would authorize the board to issue a cease and desist order in response to a violation or threatened violation of any decision or order of the board or any extraction restriction, limitation, order, or regulation adopted or issued under the provisions of this bill. (3)Existing law, with certain exceptions, requires each person who diverts water after December 31, 1965, to file with the State Water Resources Control Board a prescribed statement of diversion and use. Existing law subjects a person to civil liability if that person fails to file, as required, a diversion and use statement for a diversion or use that occurs after January 1, 2009, tampers with any measuring device, or makes a material misstatement in connection with the filing of a diversion or use statement. Existing law provides that the making of any willful misstatement in connection with these provisions is a misdemeanor punishable as prescribed. This bill would establish groundwater reporting requirements for a person extracting groundwater in an area within a basin that is not within the management area of a groundwater sustainability agency or a probationary basin. The bill would require the reports to be submitted to the board or, in certain areas, to an entity designated as a local agency by the board, as specified. This bill would require each report to be accompanied by a specified fee. This bill would apply the above-described criminal and civil liability provisions to a report or measuring device required by this reporting requirement. By expanding the definition of a crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. Existing law authorizes the board or the Department of Water Resources to adopt emergency regulations providing for the filing of reports of water diversion or use that are required to be filed. This bill would authorize the board or the department to adopt emergency regulations providing for the filing of reports of water extraction. (4)Existing law requires the legislative body of each county and city to adopt a comprehensive, long-term general plan for the physical development of the county or city with specified elements, including, among others, land use and conservation elements. Existing law requires a city or county, upon the adoption or revision of its general plan, on or after January 1, 1996, to utilize as a source document any urban water management plan submitted to the city or county by a water agency. This bill would require, prior to the adoption or any substantial amendment of a general plan, the planning agency to review and consider a groundwater sustainability plan, groundwater management plan, groundwater management court order, judgment, or decree, adjudication of water rights, or a certain order or interim plan by the State Water Resources Control Board. This bill would require the planning agency to refer a proposed action to adopt or substantially amend a general plan to any groundwater sustainability agency that has adopted a groundwater sustainability plan or local agency that otherwise manages groundwater and to the State Water Resources Control Board if it has adopted an interim plan that includes territory within the planning area. Existing law requires a public water system to provide a planning agency with certain information upon receiving notification of a city’s or a county’s proposed action to adopt or substantially amend a general plan. This bill would also require a groundwater sustainability agency or an entity that submits an alternative to provide the planning agency with certain information as is appropriate and relevant, including a report on the anticipated effect of the proposed action on implementation of a groundwater sustainability plan. By imposing new duties on a city or county, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. (5)Senate Bill 1168 of the 2013–14 Regular Session, if enacted, would enact the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act, and would define “undesirable result” for purposes of those provisions. The act would grant specified authority to a groundwater sustainability agency relating to controlling groundwater extractions, and would specify that various provisions do not supersede the land use authority of cities and counties, as specified. This bill would revise the definition of “undesirable result,” and would specify that certain authority granted to a groundwater sustainability agency to control groundwater extractions shall be consistent with applicable elements of a city or county general plan, except as specified. The bill would provide that the provisions against superseding the land use authority of cities and counties apply to that authority within the overlying basin, including the city or county general plan, and would require a groundwater sustainability plan to take into account the most recent planning assumptions stated in local general plans overlying the basin. (6)The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that with regard to certain mandates no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. With regard to any other mandates, this bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs so mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above. (7)Existing constitutional provisions require that a statute that limits the right of access to the meetings of public bodies or the writings of public officials and agencies be adopted with findings demonstrating the interest protected by the limitation and the need for protecting that interest. This bill would make legislative findings to that effect. (8)This bill would make its operation contingent on the enactment of SB 1168 of the 2013–14 Regular Session. Hide
An Act to Add Section 12211.5 to the Business and Professions Code, Relating to Weights and Measures. AB 2589 (2013-2014) BloomOpposeNo
Existing law governing weights and measures provides that there is in each county the office of county sealer, as defined, of weights and measures to administer those provisions, as specified.… More
Existing law governing weights and measures provides that there is in each county the office of county sealer, as defined, of weights and measures to administer those provisions, as specified. Existing law requires a county sealer to weigh and measure packages, containers, or amounts of commodities sold, or in the process of delivery, in order to determine whether they contain the quantity or amount represented and whether they are being sold in accordance with law. In order to recover the actual costs of carrying out these provisions, this bill would authorize a county board of supervisors to charge an annual registration fee, not to exceed $640. The bill would require any adopted registration fee to be imposed only on a business location operating in the county that packs, imports, warehouses, or distributes more than 10,000 packages or containers per year that intends to sell or distribute for sale those packages or containers and to exempt any person or entity operating a business location at which both retail sales and commodity packing operations are conducted if the retail sales activities constitute the significant majority of its business operations. Hide
An Act Relating to Milk Products. AB 31 (2013-2014) PanOpposeNo
Existing law empowers the Secretary of Food and Agriculture to formulate stabilization and marketing plans that establish the prices to be paid by milk handlers for specified classes of market milk.… More
Existing law empowers the Secretary of Food and Agriculture to formulate stabilization and marketing plans that establish the prices to be paid by milk handlers for specified classes of market milk. Existing law requires the secretary to take relevant economic factors into consideration in establishing the price to be paid for class 4b market milk, which comprises all market milk, market skim milk, or market cream used in the manufacture of cheese other than cottage cheese. This bill would make specified legislative findings and declarations regarding challenges faced by the dairy industry and would state specified intents of the Legislature. Hide
An Act to Add Section 89227 to the Education Code, Relating to Public Postsecondary Education. AB 46 (2013-2014) PanOpposeNo
Existing law establishes the California State University, under the administration of the Trustees of the California State University, as one of the segments of public postsecondary education in this… More
Existing law establishes the California State University, under the administration of the Trustees of the California State University, as one of the segments of public postsecondary education in this state. Under existing law, the California State University comprises 23 institutions of higher education throughout the state. Existing law requires the trustees to establish a series of uniform definitions for online education for the California State University on or before January 1, 2015, as specified. Existing law also requires the trustees to report performance data about online education to the Legislature on or before January 1, 2017, and every 2 years until 2021, and requires the trustees to report the performance data to the Legislative Analyst on or before January 1, 2017. Existing law further requires the Legislative Analyst to submit to the Legislature, on or before October 1, 2017, a status update regarding the university’s implementation of these provisions and an assessment of the extent to which the university’s online programs are operating in a manner consistent with legislative intent and statutory requirements. This bill would require the trustees to make available to the Academic Senate of the California State University and campus academic senates specified information relating to all matriculated students of the California State University who are enrolled in online courses, irrespective of whether the courses or programs in which they are enrolled are provided by faculty of the California State University or by another entity that is under contract with the university or one of its campuses. The bill would require this information to be provided in compliance with all relevant state and federal provisions of law safeguarding the privacy of the students involved. Hide
An Act to Add Chapter 20.5 (Commencing with Section 42985) to Part 3 of Division 30 of the Public Resources Code, Relating to Recycling. AB 521 (2013-2014) StoneOpposeNo
The California Integrated Waste Management Act of 1989, administered by the Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery, requires every rigid plastic packaging container, as defined, sold or… More
The California Integrated Waste Management Act of 1989, administered by the Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery, requires every rigid plastic packaging container, as defined, sold or offered for sale in this state to generally meet one of specified criteria. This bill would require the department, by June 1, 2014, in coordination with the Ocean Protection Council and the State Water Resources Control Board, to adopt regulations to implement the bill. The department would be required, by July 1, 2014, in consultation with the council and the state water board, to adopt a list that specifies those items, or categories of items, that the department finds are the major sources of marine plastic pollution and, therefore, would be a covered item for purposes of the bill, and to revise the list, as specified. The department would be required to notify the producer of a covered item, and no later than 6 months after receiving that notification, the producer of that covered item would be required to design and submit to the department a plan to reduce the producer’s proportion of the marine plastic pollution caused by that covered item for review and approval by the department. The bill would authorize one or more producers of a covered item to designate a producer responsibility organization to act as its agent to develop and implement the plan. The bill would require the plan to specify the measures to meet the marine plastic pollution reduction targets that the producer of the covered item would be required to achieve, as specified in the regulations, and would require the measures to include utilization of innovative product design, the recovery, collection, or recycling of the covered item, or a combination of those measures. The department would be required to recover the cost of reviewing and approving the marine plastic pollution reduction plan by requiring the producer to pay a fee to the department, which the department would be required to set in an amount equivalent to the department’s costs of implementing the bill. The bill would establish the Marine Plastic Pollution Prevention Subaccount in the Integrated Waste Management Fund, would require the department to deposit the fees into that subaccount, and would authorize the department to expend those fees, upon appropriation by the Legislature, to cover the department’s costs to implement the bill. The bill would authorize the department to impose a civil penalty administratively on a producer that is in violation of the bill. The bill would establish the Marine Plastic Pollution Penalty Subaccount in the Integrated Waste Management Fund, and would require the collected civil penalties to be deposited in the Marine Plastic Pollution Penalty Subaccount for expenditure by the department, upon appropriation by the Legislature, to cover the department’s costs to enforce the bill. The bill would authorize a producer, in lieu of submitting a marine plastic pollution reduction plan to the department, to voluntarily elect to pay an annual alternative compliance fee to the department, which the department would be required to set in a specified amount and revise periodically. The department would be required to deposit the alternative compliance fees in the Marine Plastic Pollution Fund, which the bill would establish in the State Treasury. The department would be authorized to expend the moneys in the fund, upon appropriation by the Legislature, in a specified manner, for innovative product design for the covered item and for recovery, collection, and recycling programs to prevent the marine plastic pollution caused by the covered item. Hide
An Act to Add Sections 3017 and 3203.5 to the Public Resources Code, Relating to Oil and Gas. AB 649 (2013-2014) NazarianOpposeNo
(1)Under existing law, the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources in the Department of Conservation regulates the drilling, operation, maintenance, and abandonment of oil and gas wells in the… More
(1)Under existing law, the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources in the Department of Conservation regulates the drilling, operation, maintenance, and abandonment of oil and gas wells in the state. The State Oil and Gas Supervisor, referred to as the supervisor, supervises the drilling, operation, maintenance, and abandonment of wells and the operation, maintenance, and removal or abandonment of tanks and facilities related to oil and gas production within an oil and gas field regarding safety and environmental damage. Existing law requires an operator of a well, before commencing the work of drilling the well, to obtain approval from the supervisor or a district deputy. Violation of these provisions is a misdemeanor. This bill would define “hydraulic fracturing” in oil and gas operations and would prohibit hydraulic fracturing, as well as the use of clean freshwater for purposes of hydraulic fracturing, on any oil or gas well, if the well is located within 4,000 feet from a home, public building, school, surface waters, underground source of drinking water, or any other sensitive human or environmental resource in the state from an aquifer, until the completion of a report, as specified, and a determination is made that hydraulic fracturing can be conducted without a risk to the public health, welfare, environment, or the economy of the state. The bill would also express the intent of the Legislature to, among other things, protect the public health and welfare, natural and environmental resources and economic interest of the state. (2)Existing law establishes the Natural Resources Agency consisting of various entities, departments, and boards. Existing law also establishes the California Environmental Protection Agency consisting of various entities, departments, and boards. This bill would require the Secretary of the Natural Resources Agency and the Secretary for Environmental Protection to (A) convene an advisory committee, by July 1, 2014, to develop a report relating to hydraulic fracturing, as specified; (B) to complete the report on or before January 1, 2018, and provide a copy to the Governor and the Legislature on or before that date; and (C) to make a determination, as specified, not later than January 1, 2019, as to whether and under what conditions hydraulic fracturing is permitted within the state. This bill would prohibit hydraulic fracturing in certain wells, as well as the use of freshwater for hydraulic fracturing purposes in those wells, the violation of which would be a misdemeanor. By creating a new crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
An Act to Add Article 15 (Commencing with Section 111224) to Chapter 5 of Part 5 of Division 104 of the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Public Health. SB 1000 (2013-2014) MonningOpposeNo
(1)Existing federal law, the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, regulates, among other things, the quality and packaging of foods introduced or delivered for introduction into interstate commerce… More
(1)Existing federal law, the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, regulates, among other things, the quality and packaging of foods introduced or delivered for introduction into interstate commerce and generally prohibits the misbranding of food. Existing federal law, the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act of 1990, governs state and local labeling requirements, including those that characterize the relationship of any nutrient specified in the labeling of food to a disease or health-related condition. Existing state law, the Sherman Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Law, generally regulates misbranded food and provides that any food is misbranded if its labeling does not conform with the requirements for nutrient content or health claims as set forth in the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and the regulations adopted pursuant to that federal act. Existing law requires that a food facility, as defined, make prescribed disclosures and warnings to consumers, as specified. A violation of these provisions is a crime. Existing state law, the Pupil Nutrition, Health, and Achievement Act of 2001, also requires the sale of only certain beverages to pupils at schools. The beverages that may be sold include fruit-based and vegetable-based drinks, drinking water with no added sweetener, milk, and in middle and high schools, an electrolyte replacement beverage if those beverages meet certain nutritional requirements. This bill would establish the Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Safety Warning Act, which would prohibit a person from distributing, selling, or offering for sale a sugar-sweetened beverage in a sealed beverage container, or a multipack of sugar-sweetened beverages, in this state unless the beverage container or multipack bears a specified safety warning, as prescribed. The bill also would require every person who owns, leases, or otherwise legally controls the premises where a vending machine or beverage dispensing machine is located, or where a sugar-sweetened beverage is sold in an unsealed container to place a specified safety warning in certain locations, including, on the exterior of any vending machine that includes a sugar-sweetened beverage for sale.(2)Under existing law, the State Department of Public Health, upon the request of a health officer, as defined, may authorize the local health department of a city, county, city and county, or local health district to enforce the provisions of the Sherman Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Law. Existing law authorizes the State Department of Public Health to assess a civil penalty against any person in an amount not to exceed $1,000 per day, except as specified. Existing law authorizes the Attorney General or any district attorney, on behalf of the State Department of Public Health, to bring an action in a superior court to grant a temporary or permanent injunction restraining a person from violating any provision of the Sherman Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Law. This bill, commencing July 1, 2015, would provide that any violation of the provisions described in (1) above, or regulations adopted pursuant to those provisions, is punishable by a civil penalty of not less than $50, but no greater than $500. By imposing additional enforcement duties on local agencies, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. This bill would also create the Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Safety Warning Fund for the receipt of all moneys collected for violations of those provisions. The bill would allocate moneys in this fund, upon appropriation by the Legislature, to the local enforcement agencies for the purpose of enforcing those provisions. The bill would make legislative findings and declarations relating to the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages, obesity, and dental disease. (3)The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to these statutory provisions. Hide
An Act to Amend Sections 10927, 10933, and 12924 Of, to Add Sections 113 and 10750.1 To, and to Add Part 2.74 (Commencing with Section 10720) to Division 6 Of, the Water Code, Relating to Groundwater. SB 1168 (2013-2014) PavleyOpposeNo
(1)The California Constitution requires the reasonable and beneficial use of water. Existing law establishes various state water policies, including the policy that the people of the state have a… More
(1)The California Constitution requires the reasonable and beneficial use of water. Existing law establishes various state water policies, including the policy that the people of the state have a paramount interest in the use of all the water of the state and that the state is required to determine what water of the state, surface and underground, can be converted to public use or be controlled for public protection. This bill would state the policy of the state that groundwater resources be managed sustainably for long-term reliability and multiple economic, social, and environmental benefits for current and future beneficial uses. This bill would state that sustainable groundwater management is best achieved locally through the development, implementation, and updating of plans and programs based on the best available science. (2)Existing law requires the Department of Water Resources, in conjunction with other public agencies, to conduct an investigation of the state’s groundwater basins and to report its findings to the Legislature not later than January 1, 2012, and thereafter in years ending in 5 and 0. Existing law requires the department to identify the extent of monitoring of groundwater elevations that is being undertaken within each basin or subbasin and to prioritize groundwater basins and subbasins based on specified considerations, including any information determined to be relevant by the department. This bill would specify that this relevant information may include adverse impacts on local habitat and local streamflows. This bill would require the department to categorize each basin as high-, medium-, low-, or very low priority and would require the initial priority for each basin to be established no later than January 31, 2015. This bill would authorize a local agency to request that the department revise the boundaries of a basin and would require the department, by January 1, 2016, to adopt regulations on the methodology and criteria to be used to evaluate the proposed revision. This bill would require the department to provide a copy of its draft revision of a basin’s boundaries to the California Water Commission and would require the commission to hear and comment on the draft revision. (3)Existing law authorizes local agencies to adopt and implement a groundwater management plan. Existing law requires a groundwater management plan to contain specified components and requires a local agency seeking state funds administered by the Department of Water Resources for groundwater projects or groundwater quality projects to do certain things, including, but not limited to, preparing and implementing a groundwater management plan that includes basin management objectives for the groundwater basin. This bill, with certain exceptions, would prohibit, beginning January 1, 2015, a new groundwater management plan from being adopted or an existing groundwater management plan from being renewed. This bill would require all groundwater basins designated as high- or medium-priority basins by the Department of Water Resources that are designated as basins subject to critical conditions of overdraft to be managed under a groundwater sustainability plan or coordinated groundwater sustainability plans by January 31, 2020, and would require all other groundwater basins designated as high- or medium-priority basins to be managed under a groundwater sustainability plan or coordinated groundwater sustainability plans by January 31, 2022, except as specified. This bill would require a groundwater sustainability plan to be developed and implemented to meet the sustainability goal, established as prescribed, and would require the plan to include prescribed components. This bill would encourage and authorize basins designated as low- or very low priority basins to be managed under groundwater sustainability plans. This bill would authorize any local agency, as defined, or combination of local agencies to elect to be a groundwater sustainability agency and would require, within 30 days of electing to be or forming a groundwater sustainability agency, the groundwater sustainability agency to inform the department of its election or formation and its intent to undertake sustainable groundwater management. This bill would provide that a county within which an area unmanaged by a groundwater sustainability agency lies is presumed to be the groundwater sustainability agency for that area and would require the county to provide a prescribed notification to the department. This bill would provide specific authority to a groundwater sustainability agency, including, but not limited to, the ability to require registration of a groundwater extraction facility, to require that a groundwater extraction facility be measured with a water-measuring device, and to regulate groundwater extraction. This bill would authorize a groundwater sustainability agency to conduct inspections and would authorize a groundwater sustainability agency to obtain an inspection warrant. Because the willful refusal of an inspection lawfully authorized by an inspection warrant is a misdemeanor, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program by expanding the application of a crime. (4)The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. (5)This bill would make its operation contingent on the enactment of both AB 1739 and SB 1319 of the 2013–14 Regular Session. Hide
An Act to Add Section 110663 To, and to Add Article 6.6 (Commencing with Section 110808) to Chapter 5 of Part 5 of Division 104 Of, the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Genetically Engineered Food. SB 1381 (2013-2014) EvansOpposeNo
Existing law, the Sherman Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Law, makes it unlawful to manufacture, sell, deliver, hold, or offer for sale, any food that is misbranded. Food is misbranded if its labeling does… More
Existing law, the Sherman Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Law, makes it unlawful to manufacture, sell, deliver, hold, or offer for sale, any food that is misbranded. Food is misbranded if its labeling does not conform to specified state and federal labeling requirements regarding nutrition, nutrient content or health claims, and food allergens. Violation of this law is a misdemeanor. This bill, beginning January 1, 2016, would require that any food, except as provided, offered for retail sale in the state be considered misbranded if it is entirely or partially genetically engineered, as defined, and that fact is not disclosed in a specified manner. The bill would prescribe labeling requirements for a raw agricultural commodity that is genetically engineered and packaged foods, as defined, containing some products of genetic engineering. The bill would impose these labeling requirements on manufacturers and retailers, as defined, of the commodities and foods.Because this bill would create new crimes by expanding the number of foods that could potentially be misbranded, it would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
An Act to Add Section 25536.7 to the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Hazardous Materials. SB 54 (2013-2014) HancockOpposeYes
Existing law establishes an accidental release prevention program implemented by the Office of Emergency Services and the appropriate administering agency, as defined, in each city or county. Under… More
Existing law establishes an accidental release prevention program implemented by the Office of Emergency Services and the appropriate administering agency, as defined, in each city or county. Under existing law, stationary sources subject to this accidental release prevention program are required to prepare a risk management plan (RMP) when required under certain federal regulations or if the administering agency determines there is a significant likelihood that the use of regulated substances by a stationary source may pose a regulated substances accident risk. Under existing law, the RMP is required to be submitted to the California Environmental Protection Agency and to the administering agency. Existing law imposes criminal penalties upon a stationary source that knowingly violates requirements of the accidental release prevention program. This bill would require an owner or operator of a stationary source that is engaged in certain activities with regard to petroleum and with one or more covered processes that is required to prepare and submit an RMP, when contracting for the performance of construction, alteration, demolition, installation, repair, or maintenance work at the stationary source, to require that its contractors and any subcontractors use a skilled and trained workforce to perform all onsite work within an apprenticeable occupation in the building and construction trades, including skilled journeypersons paid at least a rate equivalent to the applicable prevailing hourly wage rate. The bill would not apply to oil and gas extraction operations. Because the bill would make a knowing violation of these requirements a crime, and would otherwise impose new duties upon local agencies administering the program, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. This bill would require the Chief of the Division of Apprenticeship Standards of the Department of Industrial Relations to approve a curriculum of in-person classroom and laboratory instruction for approved advanced safety training for workers at high hazard facilities by January 1, 2016. The bill would define terms for purposes of the bill. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for specified reasons. Hide
An Act to Add Chapter 4.2 (Commencing with Section 39730) to Part 2 of Division 26 of the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Greenhouse Gases. SB 605 (2013-2014) LaraOpposeNo
The California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 designates the State Air Resources Board as the state agency charged with monitoring and regulating sources of emissions of greenhouse gases. The… More
The California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 designates the State Air Resources Board as the state agency charged with monitoring and regulating sources of emissions of greenhouse gases. The state board is required to adopt a statewide greenhouse gas emissions limit equivalent to the statewide greenhouse gas emissions level in 1990 to be achieved by 2020 and to adopt rules and regulations in an open public process to achieve the maximum, technologically feasible, and cost-effective greenhouse gas emissions reductions. This bill would require the state board to complete a comprehensive strategy to reduce emissions of short-lived climate pollutants, as defined, in the state. Hide
AB 10 (2011-2012) AlejoOpposeNo
An Act to Add Article 2.5 (Commencing with Section 2811) to Chapter 2 of Division 3 of the Labor Code, Relating to Employment. AB 1236 (2011-2012) FongSupportYes
The E-Verify Program of the United States Department of Homeland Security, in partnership with the United States Social Security Administration, enables participating employers to use the program, on… More
The E-Verify Program of the United States Department of Homeland Security, in partnership with the United States Social Security Administration, enables participating employers to use the program, on a voluntary basis, to verify that the employees they hire are authorized to work in the United States. The bill would prohibit the state, or a city, county, city and county, or special district, from requiring an employer other than one of those government entities to use an electronic employment verification system except when required by federal law or as a condition of receiving federal funds. Hide
AB 1319 (2011-2012) ButlerOpposeYes
AB 134 (2011-2012) DickinsonSupportYes
An Act to Amend Section 12894 of the Government Code, and to Add Chapter 4.1 (Commencing with Section 39710) to Part 2 of Division 26 of the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Greenhouse Gas Emissions. AB 1532 (2011-2012) PerezOpposeYes
The California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 designates the State Air Resources Board as the state agency charged with monitoring and regulating sources of emissions of greenhouse gases. The… More
The California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 designates the State Air Resources Board as the state agency charged with monitoring and regulating sources of emissions of greenhouse gases. The state board is required to adopt a statewide greenhouse gas emissions limit equivalent to the statewide greenhouse gas emissions level in 1990 to be achieved by 2020, and to adopt rules and regulations in an open public process to achieve the maximum, technologically feasible, and cost-effective greenhouse gas emissions reductions. The act authorizes the state board to include use of market-based compliance mechanisms. Existing law imposes limitations on any link, as defined, between the state and another state, province, or country for purposes of a market-based compliance mechanism by, among other things, prohibiting any state agency, including the state board, from taking any action to create such a link unless the state agency notifies the Governor, and the Governor issues specified written findings on the proposed link that consider the advice of the Attorney General. This bill would prohibit the Governor’s written findings on the proposed link from being subject to judicial review. Existing law requires all moneys, except for fines and penalties, collected by the state board from the auction or sale of allowances as part of a market-based compliance mechanism to be deposited in the Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund and to be available upon appropriation by the Legislature. This bill would require the moneys in the Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund to be used for specified purposes. The bill would require the Department of Finance, in consultation with the state board and any other relevant state entity, to develop, as specified, a 3-year investment plan that includes specified analysis and information and to submit the plan to the Legislature, as specified. The bill would require the Department of Finance to submit a report no later than March 1, 2014, and annually thereafter, to the appropriate committees of the Legislature containing specified information. This bill would make its provisions contingent on the enactment of other legislation, as specified. Hide
An Act to Add Section 388 to the Penal Code, Relating to Agricultural Employee Safety. AB 2676 (2011-2012) CalderonOpposeNo
Existing law permits the Occupational Safety and Health Standards Board within the Department of Industrial Relations to adopt occupational health and safety standards to protect the welfare of… More
Existing law permits the Occupational Safety and Health Standards Board within the Department of Industrial Relations to adopt occupational health and safety standards to protect the welfare of employees, and existing regulations provide for the prevention of heat-related illness of employees, as prescribed. Under existing law, it is a misdemeanor for an employer to violate a safety standard if the violation has a substantial probability of resulting in death or serious physical harm. This bill would make it a crime for any person who directs an agricultural employee to perform, or supervises an agricultural employee in the performance of, outdoor work without providing the employee with shade and potable water, punishable by imprisonment not exceeding 6 months in a county jail, by a fine not exceeding $10,000, or by both the imprisonment and fine, or if that violation results in injury to an agricultural employee, by imprisonment not exceeding one year in a county jail, by a fine not exceeding $25,000, or by both that fine and imprisonment. By creating a new crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
An Act to Add Section 2021 to the Fish and Game Code, Relating to Sharks. AB 376 (2011-2012) FongOpposeYes
Existing law makes it unlawful to possess any bird, mammal, fish, reptile, or amphibian, or parts thereof, taken in violation of any of the provisions of the Fish and Game Code, or of any regulation… More
Existing law makes it unlawful to possess any bird, mammal, fish, reptile, or amphibian, or parts thereof, taken in violation of any of the provisions of the Fish and Game Code, or of any regulation made under it. This bill, except as specified, would make it unlawful for any person to possess, sell, offer for sale, trade, or distribute a shark fin, as defined. The bill, by creating a new crime, would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
AB 46 (2011-2012) PerezOpposeNo
AB 523 (2011-2012) ValadaoSupportYes
AB 59 (2011-2012) SwansonOpposeNo
AB 688 (2011-2012) PanSupportYes
An Act to Amend Section 11005.4 Of, and to Add Section 11005.8 To, the Government Code, and to Amend Section 12401 Of, and to Add Section 10300.1 To, the Public Contract Code, Relating to Public Contracts. AB 727 (2011-2012) MitchellOpposeNo
Existing law regulates various aspects of the provision of food and beverages in vending machines, including requiring a vendor that operates or maintains a vending machine on designated state… More
Existing law regulates various aspects of the provision of food and beverages in vending machines, including requiring a vendor that operates or maintains a vending machine on designated state property to offer food and beverages in the vending machine that meet accepted nutritional guidelines, as defined, in accordance with certain percentages. Existing law governing contracting between state agencies and private contractors sets forth requirements for the procurement of supplies, materials, equipment, and services by state agencies and sets forth the various responsibilities of the Department of General Services and other state agencies in overseeing and implementing state contracting procedures and policies. This bill would require, beginning January 1, 2014, at least 50% of food and beverages offered by a vendor in a vending machine on state property, as defined, to meet accepted nutritional guidelines. The bill also would revise the definition of accepted nutritional guidelines for this purpose. This bill would additionally require, beginning January 1, 2014, or upon expiration of an existing contract, whichever occurs later, any food sold in a state-owned or state-leased building to meet the standard criteria for food and nutrition guidelines for concessions as determined under the federal Health and Sustainability Guidelines for Federal Concessions and Vending Operations. This bill would also require the Department of General Services, when approving contracts for the purchase of food sold in any state-owned or state-leased building, to give preference to, and not include disincentives for, food which meets certain criteria, as specified, and would require the Department of General Services to provide state agencies with the federal Health and Sustainability Guidelines for Federal Concessions and Vending Operations. The bill would make related legislative findings regarding its purpose. Hide
An Act to Add Section 110756 to the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Food Labeling. AB 88 (2011-2012) HuffmanOpposeNo
The Sherman Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Law makes it unlawful to manufacture, sell, deliver, hold, or offer for sale, any food that is misbranded. Food is misbranded if its labeling does not conform to… More
The Sherman Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Law makes it unlawful to manufacture, sell, deliver, hold, or offer for sale, any food that is misbranded. Food is misbranded if its labeling does not conform to specified federal labeling requirements regarding nutrition, nutrient content or health claims, and food allergens. Violation of this law is a misdemeanor. This bill would state the intent of the Legislature to enact legislation to require the labeling of all genetically engineered salmon entering and sold within the state.This bill would provide that food is misbranded if the food is a genetically engineered fish or fish product, as defined, and its labeling does not conspicuously identify the fish or fish product as genetically engineered. This bill would make related findings. By changing the definition of a crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 9016 of the Elections Code, and to Repeal Section 1 of Chapter 732 of the Statutes of 2010, Relating to Elections. SB 202 (2011-2012) HancockOpposeYes
Existing law permits the voters to propose and adopt a statute or constitutional amendment through the power of the initiative, and to approve or reject a statute or a part of a statute through the… More
Existing law permits the voters to propose and adopt a statute or constitutional amendment through the power of the initiative, and to approve or reject a statute or a part of a statute through the power of the referendum, by presenting to the Secretary of State a petition that sets forth the text of the proposed measure and is certified to have been signed by a specified number of electors. Existing law requires the Secretary of State to submit a certified initiative measure at the next general election held at least 131 days after the measure qualifies for the ballot or at any statewide special election that is held prior to that general election and is held at least 131 days after the measure qualifies for the ballot, and further requires the Secretary of State to submit a certified referendum measure at the next general election held at least 31 days after the measure qualifies for the ballot or at any statewide special election that is held prior to that general election. Under existing law, “general election” is defined to mean either the election held throughout the state on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November of each even-numbered year or any statewide election held on a regular election date, as specified. This bill would provide that, notwithstanding the above definition of “general election,” that term means, for purposes of submitting to the voters an initiative or referendum measure that is certified for the ballot on or after July 1, 2011, only the election held throughout the state on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November of each even-numbered year. Existing law requires the Secretary of State to submit ACA 4 of the 2009–10 Regular Session, a proposed legislative constitutional amendment relating to state finance, to the voters at the 2012 statewide presidential primary election, as specified. This bill would repeal those provisions and would, instead, require the Secretary of State to submit ACA 4 to the voters at the November 4, 2014, statewide general election. Hide
An Act to Amend Sections 21178, 21180, 21181, 21183, 21185, 21187, and 21189.2 of the Public Resources Code, Relating to Environmental Quality. SB 52 (2011-2012) SteinbergSupportNo
(1)The California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) requires a lead agency, as defined, to prepare, or cause to be prepared, and certify the completion of, an environmental impact report (EIR) on a… More
(1)The California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) requires a lead agency, as defined, to prepare, or cause to be prepared, and certify the completion of, an environmental impact report (EIR) on a project that it proposes to carry out or approve that may have a significant effect on the environment or to adopt a negative declaration if it finds that the project will not have that effect. CEQA also requires a lead agency to prepare a mitigated negative declaration for a project that may have a significant effect on the environment if revisions in the project would avoid or mitigate that effect and there is no substantial evidence that the project, as revised, would have a significant effect on the environment. CEQA establishes procedures for creating the administrative record and judicial review procedure for any action or proceeding brought to challenge the lead agency’s decision to certify the EIR or to grant project approvals. The Jobs and Economic Improvement Through Environmental Leadership Act of 2011 establishes alternative procedures for creating the administrative record and specified judicial review procedures for the judicial review of the EIR and approvals granted for a leadership project related to the development of a residential, retail, commercial, sports, cultural, entertainment, or recreational use project, or clean renewable energy or clean energy manufacturing project. The act authorizes the Governor, upon application, to certify a leadership project for streamlining pursuant to the act if certain conditions are met. The act requires that the project result in a minimum investment of $100,000,000 in California upon completion of construction and not result in any net additional emission of greenhouse gases, including greenhouse gas emissions from employee transportation. This bill would require instead that a project result in a minimum investment of $100,000,000 spent on planning, design, and construction of the project. The bill, in order to maximize public health, environmental, and employment benefits, would require a lead agency to place the highest priority on feasible measures that will reduce greenhouse gas emissions on the project site and in the neighboring communities of the project site. (2)The act requires a party seeking judicial review of the EIR to bring concurrently other claims alleging a public agency has granted land use approvals or a leadership project in violation of relevant laws. This bill would repeal this provision. (3)The act requires the Judicial Council to report to the Legislature on or before January 1, 2015, on the effects of the act, including specific information on benefits, costs, and detriments. The bill would require instead that the Judicial Council report to the Legislature on the effects of the act on the administration of justice. The bill also would make technical and clarifying changes. Because a lead agency would be required to perform additional actions, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. (4)The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
SB 568 (2011-2012) LowenthalSupportNo
An Act to Amend Sections 2827 and 2827.10 of the Public Utilities Code, Relating to Energy. SB 594 (2011-2012) WolkSupportYes
Existing law relative to private energy producers requires every electric utility, as defined, to make available to an eligible customer‑generator, as defined, a standard contract or tariff for net… More
Existing law relative to private energy producers requires every electric utility, as defined, to make available to an eligible customer‑generator, as defined, a standard contract or tariff for net energy metering on a first-come-first-served basis until the time that the total rated generating capacity used by eligible customer‑generators exceeds 5% of the electric utility’s aggregate customer peak demand. Existing law requires the electric utility, upon an affirmative election by the eligible customer-generator to receive service pursuant to this contract or tariff, to either: (1) provide net surplus electricity compensation for any net surplus electricity generated in the 12-month period, or (2) allow the eligible customer-generator to apply the net surplus electricity as a credit for kilowatthours subsequently supplied by the electric utility to the surplus customer-generator. This bill would authorize an eligible customer-generator with multiple meters to elect to aggregate the electrical load of the meters located on the property where the generation facility is located and on all property adjacent or contiguous to the property on which the generation facility is located, if those properties are solely owned, leased, or rented by the eligible customer-generator, as provided. For an electric utility that is an electrical corporation, the bill would condition this authorization upon the commission making a determination that permitting eligible customer-generators to aggregate their load from multiple meters will not result in an increase in the expected revenue obligations of customers who are not eligible customer-generators. For an electric utility that is a local publicly owned electric utility or electrical cooperative, the bill would condition this authorization upon the utility’s ratemaking authority, as defined, making a determination that permitting aggregation will not result in an increase in the expected revenue obligations of customers who are not eligible customer-generators. The bill would prohibit an eligible customer-generator that chooses to aggregate from receiving net surplus electricity compensation and require the electric utility to retain kilowatthours, as prescribed. Existing law establishes a net energy metering program that is available to an eligible fuel cell customer-generator, as defined. Existing law requires that the net metering calculation be made by measuring the difference between the electricity supplied to the eligible fuel cell customer-generator and the electricity generated by the eligible fuel cell customer-generator and fed back to the electrical grid over a 12-month period. Existing law requires that an electrical corporation determine if the eligible fuel cell customer-generator was a net consumer or producer of electricity during the 12-month period. For purposes of making this determination, existing law requires that the electrical corporation aggregate the electrical load of the eligible fuel cell customer-generator under the same ownership. This bill would require that in making the determination whether the eligible fuel cell customer-generator is a net consumer or producer of electricity during the 12-month period, the electrical corporation is to aggregate the electrical load of the meters located on the property where the eligible fuel cell electrical generation facility is located and on all property adjacent or contiguous to the property on which the facility is located, if those properties are solely owned, leased, or rented by the eligible fuel cell customer-generator. Under existing law, a violation of the Public Utilities Act or any order, decision, rule, direction, demand, or requirement of the commission is a crime. Because the bill would require an expansion of the above-described net energy metering programs and would require an order or decision of the commission to implement, a violation of these provisions would impose a state-mandated local program by expanding the definition of a crime. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. This bill would incorporate additional changes in Section 2827.10 of the Public Utilities Code, proposed by AB 2165, to be operative only if AB 2165 and this bill are both chaptered and become effective on or before January 1, 2013, and this bill is chaptered last. Hide
SB 653 (2011-2012) SteinbergOpposeNo
An Act to Add Division 24 (Commencing with Section 81000) to the Food and Agricultural Code, and to Amend Section 11018 Of, and to Add Section 11018.5 To, the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Industrial Hemp. SB 676 (2011-2012) LenoSupportNo
Existing law makes it a crime to engage in any of various transactions relating to marijuana, as defined, except as otherwise authorized by law, such as the Medical Marijuana Program. For the… More
Existing law makes it a crime to engage in any of various transactions relating to marijuana, as defined, except as otherwise authorized by law, such as the Medical Marijuana Program. For the purposes of these provisions, marijuana is defined as not including the mature stalks of the plant, fiber produced from the stalks, oil or cake made from the seeds of the plant, any other compound, manufacture, salt, derivative, mixture, or preparation of the mature stalks, except the resin extracted therefrom, and fiber, oil, or cake, or the sterilized seed of the plant which is incapable of germination. This bill would revise the definition of “marijuana” so that the term would exclude industrial hemp, as defined, except where the plant is cultivated or processed for purposes not expressly allowed. The bill would define industrial hemp as a fiber or oilseed crop, or both, that is limited to the nonpsychoactive types of the plant Cannabis sativa L. and the seed produced therefrom, having no more than 310 of 1% tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) contained in the dried flowering tops, and that is cultivated and processed exclusively for the purpose of producing the mature stalks of the plant, fiber produced from the stalks, oil or cake made from the seeds of the plant, any other compound, manufacture, salt, derivative, mixture, or preparation of the mature stalks, except the resin or flowering tops extracted therefrom, fiber, oil, or cake, or the sterilized seed of the plant which is incapable of germination. The bill would enact certain provisions relating to growing industrial hemp which would apply only in Imperial, Kern, Kings, and San Joaquin Counties, except when grown by an established agricultural institution, and which would be operative only until January 1, 2020. The bill would require industrial hemp to be cultivated only from seeds imported in accordance with laws of the United States or from seeds grown in California from industrial hemp plants or grown from industrial hemp plants grown by an established agricultural research institution. The bill would require, except as specified, the person growing the industrial hemp to obtain, prior to the harvest of each crop, a laboratory test of a random sample of the crop to determine the amount of THC in the crop. The bill would require that samples to perform the testing be taken in the presence of, and be collected and transported only by, an employee or agent of a laboratory that is registered with the federal Drug Enforcement Administration. The bill would require that the test report contain specified language, that the testing laboratory provide not less than 10 original signed copies to the cultivator, and that the testing laboratory and cultivator retain an original signed copy for a minimum of 2 years. The report would be required to be made available to law enforcement officials and provided to purchasers, as specified. The bill would require all industrial hemp seed sold for planting in California to be from a crop having no more than 310 of 1% THC contained in a random sampling of the dried flowering tops and tested under these provisions, and would require the destruction of crops exceeding that content, as specified. The bill would provide that growing industrial hemp shall not be construed to authorize the possession, outside of a field of lawful cultivation, of resin, flowering tops, or leaves that have been removed from the hemp plant, except to perform required testing by an employee or agent of the testing laboratory or any cultivation of the industrial hemp plant that is not grown by an established agricultural research institution. This bill would require the Attorney General and the Hemp Industries Association to submit reports to the Legislature by January 1, 2018, regarding the economic and law enforcement impacts of industrial hemp cultivation. The bill would state the findings and declarations of the Legislature relating to industrial hemp. By revising the scope of application of existing crimes relating to marijuana, this bill would impose a state‑mandated local program. By specifying the conditions of cultivation, the violation of which would be a misdemeanor pursuant to other provisions of existing law, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
An Act to Repeal Section 5318 of the Labor Code, Relating to Workers’ Compensation. SB 959 (2011-2012) LieuSupportNo
Existing law establishes a workers’ compensation system, administered by the Administrative Director of the Division of Workers’ Compensation, to compensate an employee for injuries sustained in… More
Existing law establishes a workers’ compensation system, administered by the Administrative Director of the Division of Workers’ Compensation, to compensate an employee for injuries sustained in the course of his or her employment. Existing law requires the administrative director, after public hearings, to adopt and revise periodically an official medical fee schedule to establish reasonable maximum fees paid for medical services, drugs and pharmacy services, health care facility fees, home health care, and all other treatment, care, services, and goods, other than physician services. Existing law separately requires reimbursement for certain implantable medical devices, hardware, and instrumentation, at the provider’s documented paid cost, plus an additional 10%, plus sales tax, as specified. Under existing law, this reimbursement formula is operative only until the administrative director adopts a regulation specifying reimbursement for the designated items, as prescribed. This bill would delete the above-described reimbursement specifications relating to implantable medical devices, hardware, and instrumentation. Hide
SBX1 2 (2011-2012) SimitianOpposeYes
SBX1 23 (2011-2012) OpposeNo
An Act to Add Section 13148 to the Water Code, Relating to Water Softeners. AB 1366 (2009-2010) FeuerSupportYes
Existing law requires the State Water Resources Control Board to formulate and adopt state policy for water quality control. California regional water quality control boards are required to establish… More
Existing law requires the State Water Resources Control Board to formulate and adopt state policy for water quality control. California regional water quality control boards are required to establish water quality objectives in water quality control plans. Under existing law, a local agency, by ordinance, may limit the availability, or prohibit the installation, of residential water softening or conditioning appliances that discharge to the community sewer system if the local agency makes certain findings and includes them in the ordinance. This bill would authorize any local agency that owns or operates a community sewer system or water recycling facility, within specified areas of the state, to take action, by ordinance or resolution, after a public hearing on the matter, to control salinity inputs from residential self-regenerating water softeners to protect the quality of the waters of the state, if the appropriate regional board makes a finding that the control of residential salinity input will contribute to the achievement of water quality objectives. The bill would state related findings and declarations of the Legislature, including findings and declarations concerning the need for special legislation. Hide
An Act to Add Part 5 (Commencing with Section 71420) to Division 34 of the Public Resources Code, Relating to Climate Change. AB 1405 (2009-2010) De LeonOpposeNo
The California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 requires the State Air Resources Board to adopt regulations to require the reporting and verification of emissions of greenhouse gases and to… More
The California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 requires the State Air Resources Board to adopt regulations to require the reporting and verification of emissions of greenhouse gases and to monitor and enforce compliance with the reporting and verification program, and requires the state board to adopt a statewide greenhouse gas emissions limit equivalent to the statewide greenhouse gas emissions level in 1990 to be achieved by 2020. The act requires the state board to adopt rules and regulations in an open public process to achieve the maximum technologically feasible and cost-effective greenhouse gas emission reductions. The act authorizes the state board to include the use of market-based compliance mechanisms. The act authorizes the state board to adopt a schedule of fees to be paid by the sources of greenhouse gas emissions regulated pursuant to the act, and requires the revenues collected pursuant to that fee to be deposited into the Air Pollution Control Fund and be available, upon appropriation by the Legislature, for purposes of carrying out the act. This bill would establish the California Climate Change Community Benefits Fund, and would require a minimum of 10% of revenues generated for the state each year from the state sale of compliance instruments for market-based compliance mechanisms pursuant to the act, other than revenues collected for administrative purposes, to be deposited into that fund. The moneys in the fund would be used, upon appropriation by the Legislature, in the most impacted and disadvantaged communities, as defined, to fund programs or projects that reduce greenhouse gas emissions or mitigate direct health, or environmental, impacts of climate change through competitive grants, loans, or other funding mechanisms. The Secretary for Environmental Protection would be required to administer moneys appropriated from the fund and would be required to establish criteria and procedures, and meet other requirements in connection with implementation, as provided. Hide
An Act to Add Division 27.5 (Commencing with Section 44570) to the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Product Labeling. AB 19 (2009-2010) RuskinOpposeNo
The California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 designates the State Air Resources Board as the state agency charged with monitoring and regulating sources of emissions of greenhouse gases that… More
The California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 designates the State Air Resources Board as the state agency charged with monitoring and regulating sources of emissions of greenhouse gases that cause global warming in order to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases. This bill would enact the Carbon Labeling Act of 2009. The act would require the state board to develop and implement a program for the voluntary assessment, verification, and standardized labeling of the carbon footprint, as defined, of consumer products sold in this state. Hide
An Act to Add Chapter 5 (Commencing with Section 48800) to Part 7 of Division 30 of the Public Resources Code, Relating to Solid Waste. AB 2139 (2009-2010) ChesbroOpposeNo
The California Integrated Waste Management Act of 1989, administered by the Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery, requires a pharmaceutical manufacturer that sells or distributes medication… More
The California Integrated Waste Management Act of 1989, administered by the Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery, requires a pharmaceutical manufacturer that sells or distributes medication that is self-injected at home through the use of hypodermic needles and other similar devices to submit a plan to the department that describes how the manufacturer supports the safe collection and proper disposal of the waste devices. This bill would create the California Product Stewardship Act and would require the department, by January 1, 2012, in consultation with specified state agencies, to submit a report to the Legislature recommending that one or more consumer products be included as a covered product for purposes of the act. The bill would require a producer of a covered product, one year after the effective date of a statute designating a product as a covered product, or the product stewardship organization created by one or more producers of that covered product to act as an agent on their behalf, to submit a product stewardship plan to the department, which would be required to include specified elements, including performance goals, a collection rate, and product goals. The department would be required to review and either deem the product stewardship plan submitted to the department as complete or incomplete, within 45 days after receiving the plan. The bill would prohibit the producer of a covered product from selling a covered product 6 months after the plan is deemed complete unless the producer or product stewardship organization of the covered product has submitted a plan to the department that is deemed complete by the department. The bill would require the department, 6 months after a plan is deemed complete, and on January 1 and July 1 annually thereafter, to post on its Internet Web site the covered products that are not in compliance and the bill would require a wholesaler or retailer that distributes or sells covered products to monitor the department’s Internet Web site to determine if a covered product is in compliance. The act would require a producer of a covered product to collect the covered product pursuant to the product stewardship plan and to meet the performance goals included in the product stewardship plan. The bill would provide that a product stewardship program is in compliance with the act only if it achieves the collection rate specified in the product stewardship plan. Each producer or product stewardship organization implementing a product stewardship plan would be required to prepare and submit to the department an annual report describing the activities carried out pursuant to the product stewardship plan. A producer or product stewardship organization submitting a product stewardship plan would be required to pay the department an annual fee that would be set by the department. The bill would provide for the imposition of administrative civil penalties upon a producer who does not comply with the act’s requirements. The bill would create in the existing Integrated Waste Management Fund the Product Stewardship Account and would require that the administrative fees be deposited into that account and that the penalties be deposited into the Product Stewardship Penalty Subaccount that the bill would create in that account. The bill would authorize the fees and penalties to be expended, upon appropriation by the Legislature, to cover the board’s program implementation costs and as incentives to enhance recyclability and redesign efforts and to reduce environmental and safety impacts of covered products. Hide
An Act to Add Chapter 9 (Commencing with Section 119420) to Part 15 of Division 104 of the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Flushable Products. AB 2256 (2009-2010) HuffmanOpposeNo
Existing law regulates the labeling requirements on various consumer products. This bill would prohibit, on or after January 1, 2012, a person from packaging or labeling a consumer product, as… More
Existing law regulates the labeling requirements on various consumer products. This bill would prohibit, on or after January 1, 2012, a person from packaging or labeling a consumer product, as defined, for distribution or sale in California if that product is contained in a package, or has an affixed label, that states that the product is flushable, sewer and septic safe, or other like term or phrase unless the product meets specified criteria. The bill would require a person who has packaged or labeled a consumer product for distribution or sale in California that is labeled as flushable, sewer and septic safe, or other like term or phrase, to maintain, in written form, documentation of the testing substantiating the validity of the claim, except as specified. The bill would exempt certain retailers and wholesalers from these provisions. The bill would make violation of this provision punishable by a fine of up to $2,500. Hide
An Act to Add Section 1714.43 to the Civil Code, and to Add Section 19547.5 to the Revenue and Taxation Code, Relating to Human Trafficking. SB 657 (2009-2010) SteinbergOpposeYes
The federal Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 establishes an Interagency Task Force to Monitor and Combat Trafficking, as specified. Existing state law makes human… More
The federal Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 establishes an Interagency Task Force to Monitor and Combat Trafficking, as specified. Existing state law makes human trafficking a crime. Existing state law also allows a victim of human trafficking to bring a civil action for actual damages, compensatory damages, punitive damages, injunctive relief, any combination of those, or any other appropriate relief. Existing law generally regulates various business activities and practices, including those of retail sellers and manufacturers of products. This bill would enact the California Transparency in Supply Chains Act of 2010, and would, beginning January 1, 2012, require retail sellers and manufacturers doing business in the state to disclose their efforts to eradicate slavery and human trafficking from their direct supply chains for tangible goods offered for sale, as specified. That provision would not apply to a retail seller or manufacturer having less than $100,000,000 in annual worldwide gross receipts. The bill would also make a specified statement of legislative intent regarding slavery and human trafficking. The bill would also require the Franchise Tax Board to make available to the Attorney General a list of retail sellers and manufacturers required to disclose efforts to eradicate slavery and human trafficking pursuant to that provision, as specified. Hide
An Act to Add and Repeal Chapter 12 (Commencing with Section 108940) of Part 3 of Division 104 of the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Product Safety. SB 797 (2009-2010) PavleyOpposeNo
Existing law prohibits the manufacture, sale, or distribution in commerce of certain toys and child care articles, as defined, if those products contain specified types of phthalates in… More
Existing law prohibits the manufacture, sale, or distribution in commerce of certain toys and child care articles, as defined, if those products contain specified types of phthalates in concentrations exceeding 110 of 1%. Existing law also requires manufacturers to use the least toxic alternative when replacing phthalates in their products and would prohibit manufacturers from replacing phthalates with certain carcinogens and reproductive toxicants. The bill would enact the Toxin-Free Infants and Toddlers Act, which would, except as specified, prohibit, on and after January 1, 2012, the manufacture, sale, or distribution in commerce of any bottle, cup, or liquid, food, or beverage in a can, jar, or plastic bottle that contains bisphenol A, or that is lined with a material that contains bisphenolA, at a level above 0.1 parts per billion (ppb). It would also, except as specified, prohibit, on and after July 1, 2012, the manufacture, sale, or distribution of liquid infant formula in a can or plastic bottle containing bisphenolA or lined with a material containing it. The bill would also require manufacturers to use the least toxic alternative when replacing bisphenolA in containers in accordance with this bill. This bill would repeal these provisions if the Department of Toxic Substances Control adopts a specified regulatory response. Hide