Beer

TopicBill numbersort iconAuthorInterest positionBecame law
An Act to Amend Section 2810.5 Of, and to Add Article 1.5 (Commencing with Section 245) to Chapter 1 of Part 1 of Division 2 Of, the Labor Code, Relating to Employment. AB 1522 (2013-2014) GonzalezOpposeYes
Existing law authorizes employers to provide their employees paid sick leave. This bill would enact the Healthy Workplaces, Healthy Families Act of 2014 to provide that an employee who, on or after… More
Existing law authorizes employers to provide their employees paid sick leave. This bill would enact the Healthy Workplaces, Healthy Families Act of 2014 to provide that an employee who, on or after July 1, 2015, works in California for 30 or more days within a year from the commencement of employment is entitled to paid sick days for prescribed purposes, to be accrued at a rate of no less than one hour for every 30 hours worked. An employee would be entitled to use accrued sick days beginning on the 90th day of employment. The bill would authorize an employer to limit an employee’s use of paid sick days to 24 hours or 3 days in each year of employment. The bill would prohibit an employer from discriminating or retaliating against an employee who requests paid sick days. The bill would require employers to satisfy specified posting and notice and recordkeeping requirements. The bill would define terms for those purposes. The bill would require the Labor Commissioner to enforce these requirements, including the investigation, mitigation, and relief of violations of these requirements. The bill would authorize the Labor Commissioner to impose specified administrative fines for violations and would authorize the commissioner or the Attorney General to recover specified civil penalties against an offender who violated these provisions on behalf of the aggrieved, as well as attorney’s fees, costs, and interest. The bill would not apply to certain categories of employees that meet specified requirements. Hide
An Act to Repeal and Add Section 113961 of the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Food Safety, and Declaring the Urgency Thereof, to Take Effect Immediately. AB 2130 (2013-2014) PanSupportYes
Under existing law, the California Retail Food Code, the State Department of Public Health establishes uniform health and sanitation standards for retail food facilities and local health agencies are… More
Under existing law, the California Retail Food Code, the State Department of Public Health establishes uniform health and sanitation standards for retail food facilities and local health agencies are required to enforce these provisions. A person who violates any provision of the code is guilty of a misdemeanor. Existing law requires food employees to wash their hands in accordance with specified provisions and prohibits food employees from contacting exposed, ready-to-eat food with their bare hands, except under certain conditions, including when washing fruits and vegetables and when not serving a highly susceptible population, as specified. This bill would instead require that food employees minimize bare hand and arm contact with nonprepackaged food that is in a ready-to-eat form. The bill would require food employees to use utensils, as specified, to assemble ready-to-eat food or to place ready-to-eat food on tableware or in other containers. The bill would authorize food employees to assemble or place on tableware or in other containers ready-to-eat food in an approved food preparation area without using utensils if hands are cleaned in accordance with specified provisions. The bill would require that food that has been served to the consumer and then wrapped or prepackaged at the direction of the consumer be handled only with utensils. The bill would require these utensils to be properly sanitized before reuse. By revising the standards that are required to be enforced by local health agencies and changing the scope of an existing crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that with regard to certain mandates no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. With regard to any other mandates, this bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs so mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above. This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as an urgency statute. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 25249.7 of the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Toxic Substances, and Declaring the Urgency Thereof, to Take Effect Immediately. AB 227 (2013-2014) GattoSupportYes
(1)The existing Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986 (Proposition 65) prohibits any person, in the course of doing business, from knowingly and intentionally exposing any individual… More
(1)The existing Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986 (Proposition 65) prohibits any person, in the course of doing business, from knowingly and intentionally exposing any individual to a chemical known to the state to cause cancer or reproductive toxicity without giving a specified warning, or from knowingly discharging or releasing such a chemical into water or any source of drinking water, except as specified. The act imposes civil penalties of not more than $2,500 per day upon persons who violate those prohibitions, and provides for the enforcement of those prohibitions by the Attorney General, a district attorney, or specified city attorneys or prosecutors, and by any person in the public interest. The act requires any person bringing an action in the public interest, or any private person filing an action in which a violation of the act is alleged, to notify the Attorney General, the district attorney, city attorney, or prosecutor in whose jurisdiction the violation is alleged to have occurred, and the alleged violator that such an action has been filed. This bill would require a person filing an enforcement action in the public interest for certain specified exposures to provide a notice in a specified proof of compliance form. The bill would prohibit an enforcement action from being filed by that person, and would prohibit the recovery of certain payments or reimbursements, if the notice to the alleged violator alleges a failure to provide a clear and reasonable warning for those specified exposures and, within 14 days after receiving the notice, the alleged violator corrects the alleged violation, pays a civil penalty in the amount of $500 per facility or premises, and notifies the person bringing the action that the violation has been corrected pursuant to the specified proof of compliance form. The bill would specify that the alleged violator may correct the violation, pay the civil penalty, and serve a correction notice on the person who served notice of the violation only one time for a violation arising from the same exposure in the same facility or on the same premises. The bill would require the Judicial Council, on April 1, 2019, and at each 5-year interval thereafter, to adjust that civil penalty, as specified. (2)Proposition 65 provides that it may be amended by a statute, passed in each house by 23 vote, to further its purposes. This bill would find and declare that it furthers the purposes of Proposition 65 and would make other findings regarding the purposes of the bill. The bill would declare that a specified provision of the bill is independent and severable from the other changes made by this bill. (3)This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as an urgency statute. Hide
An Act to Amend Sections 23012, 25200, and 25503.3 of the Business and Professions Code, Relating to Alcoholic Beverages. AB 647 (2013-2014) ChesbroSupportYes
(1)Existing law defines a “beer manufacturer” as any person engaged in the manufacture of beer, and requires a license or permit to manufacture beer, unless the beer is manufactured for personal… More
(1)Existing law defines a “beer manufacturer” as any person engaged in the manufacture of beer, and requires a license or permit to manufacture beer, unless the beer is manufactured for personal or family use under specified conditions. This bill would revise the definition of “beer manufacturer” to include only those persons that have facilities and equipment for the purposes of, and are engaged in, the commercial manufacture of beer. (2)The Alcoholic Beverage Control Act, administered by the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control, prescribes requirements for licenses for the manufacture, distribution, and sale of alcoholic beverages. The act requires that all beer sold in the state have a label affixed to its package or container with the true and correct name and address of the manufacturer of the beer and the true and correct name of the bottler of the beer if other than the manufacturer. The act provides that a violation of its provisions is a misdemeanor if not otherwise specified. This bill would require a beer label to include the brand and type of beer and would also require a beer manufacturer that refills any container supplied by a consumer to affix a label, as specified, on the container prior to its resale to the consumer. The bill would require information concerning any beer previously packaged in the container, including, but not limited to, information regarding the manufacturer and bottler of the beer, to be removed or completely obscured in a manner not readily removable by the consumer prior to resale. The bill would specify that this provision does not authorize a beer manufacturer to refill a container supplied by a consumer with a capacity of 5 liquid gallons or more. By expanding the definition of a crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. (3)Existing provisions of the Alcoholic Beverage Control Act, known as tied-house restrictions, generally prohibit manufacturers, winegrowers, bottlers, importers, wholesalers, and others from performing certain activities, with specified exceptions. Existing law allows specified licensees to serve and provide, free of charge, food, alcoholic beverages, and other items to retail licensees and their guests attending meetings, conventions, combined conventions, and trade shows, as provided. This bill would also allow a beer manufacturer or brewpub-restaurant licensee to serve beer produced by the manufacturer or brewpub-restaurant licensee to attendees at a meeting of a bona fide beer manufacturer or brewers’ guild held on the premises of a beer manufacturer. (4)The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
AB 1583 (2011-2012) HernandezSupportYes
SB 653 (2011-2012) SteinbergOpposeNo
SBX1 2 (2011-2012) SimitianOpposeYes
SBX1 23 (2011-2012) OpposeNo
An Act to Add Division 10.56 (Commencing with Section 11972.10) to the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Alcohol Abuse Programs, and Making an Appropriation Therefor. AB 1694 (2009-2010) BeallOpposeNo
Existing law requires the State Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs to perform various functions and duties with respect to the development and implementation of state and local substance abuse… More
Existing law requires the State Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs to perform various functions and duties with respect to the development and implementation of state and local substance abuse treatment programs. This bill would, in addition, establish the Alcohol-Related Services Program and the Alcohol-Related Services Program Fund and would authorize the State Board of Equalization to assess and collect specified fees from every person who is engaged in business in this state and sells alcoholic beverages for resale, as prescribed. The bill would require the fees to be deposited into the fund and would continuously appropriate those moneys exclusively for the alcohol-related services programs established pursuant to this bill. The bill would authorize the State Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs to establish, contract for, or provide grants for the establishment of component services under the program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide