Nursing homes

TopicBill numbersort iconAuthorInterest positionBecame law
An Act to Amend Section 11349.1.5 of the Government Code, Relating to State Government. AB 12 (2013-2014) CooleySupportNo
The Administrative Procedure Act governs the procedures for the adoption, amendment, or repeal of regulations by state agencies and for the review of those regulatory actions by the Office of… More
The Administrative Procedure Act governs the procedures for the adoption, amendment, or repeal of regulations by state agencies and for the review of those regulatory actions by the Office of Administrative Law. Existing law requires each state agency to prepare a standardized regulatory impact analysis, as specified, with respect to the adoption, amendment, or repeal of a major regulation, as defined, that is proposed on or after November 1, 2013. Existing law requires the Department of Finance and the office, from time to time, to review the standardized regulatory impact analyses for adherence to regulations adopted by the department. This bill would instead require the Department of Finance and the office to annually review the standardized regulatory impact analyses for adherence to the regulations adopted by the department. Existing law requires, on or before November 1, 2015, the office to submit to the Senate and Assembly Committees on Governmental Organization a report describing the extent to which submitted standardized regulatory impact analyses for proposed major regulations adhere to the regulations adopted by the department. This bill would instead require the office to annually prepare that report for the Senate Committee on Governmental Organization and the Assembly Committee on Accountability and Administrative Review and include recommendations for actions the Legislature might consider for improving state agency performance and compliance in the creation of the standardized regulatory impact analyses. This bill would also require the office to notify the Legislature of noncompliance by a state agency and to post the report and the notice of noncompliance on the office’s Internet Web site. Hide
An Act to Amend Sections 871.5 and 873 Of, to Add Sections 875.5 and 1001.7 To, to Repeal Sections 871.7, 879, 879.5, 880, 882, and 883 Of, and to Repeal and Add Sections 872, 874, 875, 876, 877, and 878 Of, the Public Utilities Code, Relating to Public Communications. AB 1407 (2013-2014) BradfordSupportNo
Existing law, the federal Telecommunications Act of 1996, establishes a program of cooperative federalism for the regulation of telecommunications to attain the goal of local competition, while… More
Existing law, the federal Telecommunications Act of 1996, establishes a program of cooperative federalism for the regulation of telecommunications to attain the goal of local competition, while implementing specific, predictable, and sufficient federal and state mechanisms to preserve and advance universal service, consistent with certain universal service principles. Under the act, universal service is an evolving level of telecommunications services that the Federal Communications Commission is required to establish periodically, taking into account advances in telecommunications and information technologies and services. Pursuant to the act, the Federal Communications Commission has established and revised a lifeline program that is available for qualifying low-income consumers. Under existing law, the Public Utilities Commission has regulatory authority over public utilities, including telephone corporations. The Moore Universal Telephone Service Act establishes the Universal Lifeline Telephone Service program in order to provide low-income households with access to affordable basic residential telephone service. Existing law establishes the Universal Lifeline Telephone Service Trust Administrative Committee Fund in the State Treasury. This bill would recast the Moore Universal Telephone Service Act so that it would provide a household, as defined, having an eligible customer, as defined, with high-quality voice communications service at affordable rates. The bill would state the intent of the Legislature to ensure that California residents have access to technologies and services and to promote technological neutrality by giving lifeline customers the ability to choose the communications provider and service that best meet their unique needs, while encouraging providers to participate in the lifeline program. The Moore Universal Telephone Service Act requires the Public Utilities Commission to annually designate a class of lifeline service necessary to meet minimum residential, as defined, communications needs, to set the rates and charges for that service, to develop eligibility criteria for that service, and to assess the degree of achievement of universal service, including telephone penetration rates by income, ethnicity, and geography. The bill would instead require the Public Utilities Commission to annually develop eligibility criteria for customers to participate in the program, assess the penetration rates for lifeline service by income, ethnicity, and geography, and to prepare and submit a report to the Legislature on the fiscal status of the lifeline program that includes a statement of the lifeline program surcharge level and revenues produced by the surcharge, the size of the Universal Lifeline Telephone Service Trust Administrative Committee Fund, the reason for a decline or increase in the size of the fund, if applicable, an accounting of program expenses, and an evaluation of options for controlling those expenses and increasing program efficiency. The Moore Universal Telephone Service Act requires that the Universal Lifeline Telephone Service rates be set at no more than 50% of either the basic rate for measured residential telephone service or the basic flat residential telephone rate service, as applicable, exclusive of federally mandated end user access charges that are available to the residential subscriber. Existing law requires that the lifeline telephone service installation or connection charge, or both, be not more than 50% of the charge for basic residential service installation or connection. The bill would repeal these requirements and instead require that through and including December 31, 2014, the nonrecurring service charge for commencing voice service for a single voice connection for a lifeline customer be no greater than $10. Until and including December 31, 2014, the lifeline provider would be eligible for reimbursement from the fund for the difference between the nonrecurring charge paid by a lifeline subscriber and the nonrecurring charge the lifeline provider charges for identical services in the ordinary course of business to subscribers that are not eligible customers, subject to the limitation that the reimbursement can be no more than $40 per connection. Beginning January 1, 2015, the Public Utilities Commission would be authorized to annually increase the nonrecurring service charge incurred by eligible customers, and the lifeline provider connection reimbursement, by an amount in proportion to the increase, if any, to the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U). The bill would authorize the commission to authorize a lifeline provider to be reimbursed pursuant to these provisions, for commencing voice service for an eligible customer, only if that provider is the customer’s carrier of last resort for basic service. The bill would require that every eligible customer be given a discount of $11.85 per month, in addition to any federally supported lifeline discount provided to customers of an eligible telecommunications carrier, and would, beginning January 1, 2015, authorize the commission to annually adjust the support amount in proportion to the increase, if any, in the CPI-U. The bill would provide that an eligible customer is not entitled to any combined monthly federal and state lifeline support in excess of the customer’s monthly rate. The bill would require that state lifeline support be provided only after federal lifeline support, if any, is received by an eligible customer.The bill would require that all providers participating in the California lifeline program offer lifeline service at the same rates that were in effect on July 1, 2013, through and including December 31, 2014. The bill would require every lifeline provider, on first contact by a prospective eligible customer, to inform the customer of the availability of the lifeline discount and how that customer may qualify for and obtain the discount. The bill would provide that a lifeline provider that is a prospective eligible customer’s carrier of last resort for basic service remains subject to any customer notification obligations applicable to the provision of basic service. The Public Utilities Act prohibits any telephone corporation from beginning the construction of, among other things, a line, plant, or system, or of any extension thereof, without having first obtained from the commission a certificate that the present or future public convenience and necessity require or will require that construction (certificate of public convenience and necessity). This bill would prohibit the commission from denying or revoking a certificate of public convenience and necessity applied for by or issued to a telephone corporation that provides retail or wholesale telecommunications services on the grounds that the telephone corporation also provides Voice over Internet Protocol service or any other unregulated service.Under existing law, a violation of the Public Utilities Act or any order, decision, rule, direction, demand, or requirement of the commission is a crime. Because the provisions of this bill would be a part of the act and would require action by the Public Utilities Commission to implement its requirements, and because the bill would expand the class of lifeline providers, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program by expanding the scope of a crime. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 2810.5 Of, and to Add Article 1.5 (Commencing with Section 245) to Chapter 1 of Part 1 of Division 2 Of, the Labor Code, Relating to Employment. AB 1522 (2013-2014) GonzalezOpposeYes
Existing law authorizes employers to provide their employees paid sick leave. This bill would enact the Healthy Workplaces, Healthy Families Act of 2014 to provide that an employee who, on or after… More
Existing law authorizes employers to provide their employees paid sick leave. This bill would enact the Healthy Workplaces, Healthy Families Act of 2014 to provide that an employee who, on or after July 1, 2015, works in California for 30 or more days within a year from the commencement of employment is entitled to paid sick days for prescribed purposes, to be accrued at a rate of no less than one hour for every 30 hours worked. An employee would be entitled to use accrued sick days beginning on the 90th day of employment. The bill would authorize an employer to limit an employee’s use of paid sick days to 24 hours or 3 days in each year of employment. The bill would prohibit an employer from discriminating or retaliating against an employee who requests paid sick days. The bill would require employers to satisfy specified posting and notice and recordkeeping requirements. The bill would define terms for those purposes. The bill would require the Labor Commissioner to enforce these requirements, including the investigation, mitigation, and relief of violations of these requirements. The bill would authorize the Labor Commissioner to impose specified administrative fines for violations and would authorize the commissioner or the Attorney General to recover specified civil penalties against an offender who violated these provisions on behalf of the aggrieved, as well as attorney’s fees, costs, and interest. The bill would not apply to certain categories of employees that meet specified requirements. Hide
An Act to Amend, Repeal, and Add Sections 1569.23, 1569.625, and 1569.626 of the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Care Facilities. AB 1570 (2013-2014) ChesbroSplitYes
Existing law provides for the licensure and regulation of residential care facilities for the elderly by the State Department of Social Services. Violation of these provisions is a misdemeanor.… More
Existing law provides for the licensure and regulation of residential care facilities for the elderly by the State Department of Social Services. Violation of these provisions is a misdemeanor. Existing law requires, as a requirement for licensure, that the applicant demonstrate that he or she has successfully completed a certification program approved by the department that includes, at a minimum, 40 hours of classroom instruction, and provides that successful completion of the certification program shall be demonstrated by passing a written test and submitting a $100 fee to the department for the issuance of a certificate of completion. Existing law also requires the department to adopt regulations to require staff members of residential care facilities for the elderly who assist residents with personal activities of daily living to receive appropriate training, which includes 10 hours within the first 4 weeks of employment and 4 hours annually thereafter. Existing law requires all residential care facilities for the elderly that advertise or promote special care, special programming, or a special environment for persons with dementia to meet additional training requirements for all direct staff. This bill would, effective January 1, 2016, instead, require the certification program for an applicant for licensure to consist of 80 hours of coursework and a state-administered examination of no less than 100 questions. The bill would require the examination to reflect the uniform core of knowledge required and would require the department, no later than July 1, 2016, and every other year thereafter, to review and revise the examination in order to ensure the rigor and quality of the examination. The bill would require staff members of residential care facilities for the elderly who assist residents with personal activities of daily living to receive 20 hours of training before working independently with residents, an additional 20 hours within the first 4 weeks of employment, and an additional 20 hours annually, as prescribed. The bill would also apply the training requirements specific to dementia care to all residential care facilities for the elderly. By expanding the scope of a crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. This bill would incorporate additional changes to Section 1569.625 of the Health and Safety Code proposed by AB 2044 that would become operative if this bill and AB 2044 are both enacted and this bill is enacted last. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. This bill would become operative only if SB 911 is enacted and takes effect on or before January 1, 2015. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 1771.8 of the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Continuing Care. AB 1751 (2013-2014) BloomOpposeYes
(1)Existing law provides for the regulation by the State Department of Social Services of activities relating to continuing care contracts that govern care provided to an elderly resident in a… More
(1)Existing law provides for the regulation by the State Department of Social Services of activities relating to continuing care contracts that govern care provided to an elderly resident in a continuing care retirement community for the duration of the resident’s life or a term in excess of one year. Existing law declares the Legislature’s finding that the residents of continuing care retirement communities have a unique and valuable perspective on the operations of, and services provided in, the community in which they live and should have input into decisions made by the provider. Existing law requires every continuing care retirement community provider to make available to the resident association or its governing body, or if neither exists, to a committee of residents, a financial statement of activities for that facility comparing actual costs to budgeted costs broken down by expense category, not less than semiannually. Existing law also requires a provider to provide a copy of the annual report at a central and conspicuous location in the community. Under existing law, an entity that issues, delivers, or publishes, or as manager or officer or in any other administrative capacity, assists in the issuance, delivery, or publication of, any printed matter, oral representation, or advertising material that does not comply with the requirements of the law relating to continuing care contracts is guilty of a misdemeanor. This bill would instead require the financial statement to be provided not less than quarterly, and would require it to include a written explanation of all significant budget variances. This bill would additionally require a provider to make a copy of the annual report available on its Internet Web site. By expanding the scope of a crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. (2)Existing law requires the governing body of a provider that is not part of a multifacility organization with more than one continuing care retirement community in the state to accept at least one resident of the continuing care retirement community it operates to participate as a nonvoting resident representative to the governing body. Existing law requires the governing body of a multifacility organization to either have at least one nonvoting resident representative to the provider’s governing body for each California-based continuing care retirement community the provider operates or to have a resident-elected committee composed of representatives of the residents of each California-based continuing care retirement community that the provider operates select or nominate at least one nonvoting resident representative to the provider’s governing body for every 3 California-based continuing care retirement communities, or fraction thereof, that the provider operates. This bill would additionally require the governing body of all providers to accept at least one resident, or 2 residents for a governing body with 21 or more members, from the continuing care retirement community or communities it operates to participate as voting members of the provider’s governing body, and would make other technical and conforming changes. The bill would require a resident member to be nominated to participate on the provider’s governing body by the resident association or, if a resident association does not exist, a committee of residents, and would authorize the resident association or committee of residents to nominate multiple nominees from which the provider’s governing body may approve a resident member. If the governing body disapproves of the resident association’s nominations, the bill would require the resident association or committee of residents to nominate additional resident members until the vacancy is filled. This bill would authorize a provider that has at least one continuing care retirement community in the state and does not have a governing body within the state to, in lieu of appointing a resident to be a voting member of its governing body, appoint a select committee of its governing body members to meet with the resident association or a resident elected committee of residents, as specified, no less frequently than at a reasonable period prior to any regularly scheduled meeting of the governing body at each of its facilities in the state to address concerns of the residents and to ensure that the opinions of residents are relayed to all governing body members of the provider. The bill would also provide for alternative representation options for a provider that is a sole proprietorship, general partnership, limited partnership, limited liability company, or a closely held corporation in lieu of appointing a resident as a voting member of the provider’s governing body, as specified. (3)The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
An Act to Add Section 14105.194 to the Welfare and Institutions Code, Relating to Medi-Cal, and Declaring the Urgency Thereof, to Take Effect Immediately. AB 1805 (2013-2014) SkinnerSupportNo
Existing law establishes the Medi-Cal program, administered by the State Department of Health Care Services, under which basic health care services are provided to qualified low-income persons. The… More
Existing law establishes the Medi-Cal program, administered by the State Department of Health Care Services, under which basic health care services are provided to qualified low-income persons. The Medi-Cal program is, in part, governed and funded by federal Medicaid Program provisions. Existing law requires, except as otherwise provided, Medi-Cal provider payments to be reduced by 1% or 5%, and provider payments for specified non-Medi-Cal programs to be reduced by 1%, for dates of service on and after March 1, 2009, and until June 1, 2011. Existing law requires, except as otherwise provided, Medi-Cal provider payments and payments for specified non-Medi-Cal programs to be reduced by 10% for dates of service on and after June 1, 2011. This bill would, instead, prohibit the application of those reductions for payments to providers for dates of service on or after June 1, 2011. The bill would also require payments for managed care health plans for dates of service following the effective date of the bill to be determined without application of some of those reductions. The bill would require the Director of Health Care Services to implement this provision to the maximum extent permitted by federal law and for the maximum time period for which the director obtains federal approval for federal financial participation for those payments. This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as an urgency statute. Hide
An Act to Amend Sections 1569.618 and 1569.625 of the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Care Facilities. AB 2044 (2013-2014) RodriguezSplitYes
Existing law provides for the licensure and regulation of residential care facilities for the elderly by the State Department of Social Services. A violation of these provisions is a… More
Existing law provides for the licensure and regulation of residential care facilities for the elderly by the State Department of Social Services. A violation of these provisions is a misdemeanor. Existing law requires the administrator designated by the licensee to be present at the facility during normal working hours and requires a facility manager, as defined, to be responsible for the operation of the facility when the administrator is temporarily absent from the facility. This bill would require that at least one administrator, facility manager, or designated substitute who is at least 21 years of age and has adequate qualifications, as specified, be on the premises of the facility 24 hours per day. The bill would also require the facility to employ, and the administrator to schedule, a sufficient number of staff members, as prescribed. Existing law requires the department to adopt regulations to require staff members who assist residents with personal activities of daily living to receive appropriate training, which consists of 10 hours of training within the first 4 weeks and 4 hours annually thereafter. Existing law requires that the training include specified topics. This bill would require that this training also include building and fire safety and the appropriate response to emergencies. By expanding the scope of a crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. This bill would incorporate additional changes to Section 1569.625 of the Health and Safety Code proposed by AB 1570 that would become operative if this bill and AB 1570 are both enacted and this bill is enacted last. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
An Act to Add Article 2.5 (Commencing with Section 1569.261) to Chapter 3.2 of Division 2 of the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Care Facilities. AB 2171 (2013-2014) WieckowskiOpposeYes
Existing law, the Residential Care Facilities for the Elderly Act, provides for the licensure and regulation of residential care facilities for the elderly by the State Department of Social Services.… More
Existing law, the Residential Care Facilities for the Elderly Act, provides for the licensure and regulation of residential care facilities for the elderly by the State Department of Social Services. A violation of these provisions is a misdemeanor. This bill would establish specified rights for residents of privately operated residential care facilities for the elderly, including, among other things, to be accorded dignity in their personal relationships with staff, to be granted a reasonable level of personal privacy of accommodations, medical treatment, personal care and assistance, and to confidential treatment of their records and personal information, as specified. The bill would require, at admission, a facility staff person to personally advise a resident and the resident’s representative, as described, of these and other specified rights and to provide them with a written copy of these rights. By expanding the scope of a crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 25249.7 of the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Toxic Substances, and Declaring the Urgency Thereof, to Take Effect Immediately. AB 227 (2013-2014) GattoSupportYes
(1)The existing Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986 (Proposition 65) prohibits any person, in the course of doing business, from knowingly and intentionally exposing any individual… More
(1)The existing Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986 (Proposition 65) prohibits any person, in the course of doing business, from knowingly and intentionally exposing any individual to a chemical known to the state to cause cancer or reproductive toxicity without giving a specified warning, or from knowingly discharging or releasing such a chemical into water or any source of drinking water, except as specified. The act imposes civil penalties of not more than $2,500 per day upon persons who violate those prohibitions, and provides for the enforcement of those prohibitions by the Attorney General, a district attorney, or specified city attorneys or prosecutors, and by any person in the public interest. The act requires any person bringing an action in the public interest, or any private person filing an action in which a violation of the act is alleged, to notify the Attorney General, the district attorney, city attorney, or prosecutor in whose jurisdiction the violation is alleged to have occurred, and the alleged violator that such an action has been filed. This bill would require a person filing an enforcement action in the public interest for certain specified exposures to provide a notice in a specified proof of compliance form. The bill would prohibit an enforcement action from being filed by that person, and would prohibit the recovery of certain payments or reimbursements, if the notice to the alleged violator alleges a failure to provide a clear and reasonable warning for those specified exposures and, within 14 days after receiving the notice, the alleged violator corrects the alleged violation, pays a civil penalty in the amount of $500 per facility or premises, and notifies the person bringing the action that the violation has been corrected pursuant to the specified proof of compliance form. The bill would specify that the alleged violator may correct the violation, pay the civil penalty, and serve a correction notice on the person who served notice of the violation only one time for a violation arising from the same exposure in the same facility or on the same premises. The bill would require the Judicial Council, on April 1, 2019, and at each 5-year interval thereafter, to adjust that civil penalty, as specified. (2)Proposition 65 provides that it may be amended by a statute, passed in each house by 23 vote, to further its purposes. This bill would find and declare that it furthers the purposes of Proposition 65 and would make other findings regarding the purposes of the bill. The bill would declare that a specified provision of the bill is independent and severable from the other changes made by this bill. (3)This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as an urgency statute. Hide
An Act to Add Part 4.5 (Commencing with Section 1450) to Division 2 Of, and to Repeal Section 1454 Of, the Labor Code, Relating to Domestic Work Employees. AB 241 (2013-2014) AmmianoOpposeYes
(1)Existing law regulates the wages, hours, and working conditions of any man, woman, and minor employed in any occupation, trade, or industry, whether compensation is measured by time, piece, or… More
(1)Existing law regulates the wages, hours, and working conditions of any man, woman, and minor employed in any occupation, trade, or industry, whether compensation is measured by time, piece, or otherwise, except as specified. Existing law creates the Industrial Welfare Commission and authorizes it to adopt rules, regulations, and orders to ensure that employers comply with those provisions. Wage Order No. 15-2001 of the commission regulates wages, hours, and working conditions for household occupations. Existing law makes violations of certain of these provisions a misdemeanor. This bill would enact the Domestic Worker Bill of Rights to, until January 1, 2017, regulate the hours of work of certain domestic work employees and provide an overtime compensation rate for those employees. The bill would define various terms for the purposes of the act, including defining domestic work to mean services related to the care of persons in private households or maintenance of private households or their premises, which would include childcare providers, caregivers of people with disabilities, sick, convalescing, or elderly persons, house cleaners, housekeepers, maids, and other household occupations. The bill would, until January 1, 2017, require the Governor to convene a committee to study and report to the Governor on the effects of this act. By expanding the definition of a crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. (2)The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
An Act to Amend Sections 51.7, 52, and 52.1 of the Civil Code, Relating to Civil Rights. AB 2617 (2013-2014) WeberOpposeYes
Existing civil rights provisions provide that all persons within the jurisdiction of this state have the right to be free from any violence, or intimidation by threat of violence, committed against… More
Existing civil rights provisions provide that all persons within the jurisdiction of this state have the right to be free from any violence, or intimidation by threat of violence, committed against their persons or property because of political affiliation, or on account of position in a labor dispute, or sex, race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, disability, or medical condition, or because another person perceives them to have one or more of those characteristics. Those civil rights provisions provide civil remedies for violations of their provisions. This bill would prohibit a person from requiring a waiver of the protections afforded under those provisions as a condition of entering into a contract for the provision of goods or services, including the right to file and pursue a civil action or complaint with, or otherwise notify, the Attorney General or any other public prosecutor, or law enforcement agency, the Department of Fair Employment and Housing, or any court or other governmental entity. This bill would require any waiver of the protections afforded under those provisions to be knowing and voluntary, and in writing, and expressly not made as a condition of entering into the contract or as a condition of providing or receiving goods or services. This bill would provide that any person seeking the enforcement of a waiver of the protections afforded under those civil rights provisions shall have the burden of proving that the waiver was knowing and voluntary and not made as a condition of the contract or of providing or receiving the goods or services. The bill’s provisions would apply to contracts entered into, altered, modified, renewed, or extended on and after January 1, 2015. This bill would provide that its provisions shall not be construed to negate other specified provisions. This bill would include legislative findings and declarations with respect to the public policy underlying its provisions. This bill would incorporate additional changes to Section 52.1 of the Civil Code proposed by AB 2634 that would become operative only if this bill and AB 2634 are both chaptered and this bill is chaptered last. Hide
An Act to Amend Sections 1522, 1568.09, 1569.17, and 1596.871 of the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Care Facilities. AB 2632 (2013-2014) MaienscheinSupportYes
Under existing law, the State Department of Social Services licenses and regulates, among other things, community care facilities, foster family home or certified family home, residential care… More
Under existing law, the State Department of Social Services licenses and regulates, among other things, community care facilities, foster family home or certified family home, residential care facilities for persons with a chronic, life-threatening illness, residential care facilities for the elderly, and child day cares. Existing law requires the department, prior to issuing a license or special permit to operate any of those facilities, to secure from an appropriate law enforcement agency a criminal record to determine whether the applicant or any other person, as specified, has been convicted of a crime other than a minor traffic violation, or arrested for certain crimes, or for any crime for which the department cannot grant an exemption if the person was convicted and the person has not been exonerated. Existing law requires an individual to obtain either a criminal record clearance or a criminal record exemption from the department prior to his or her employment, residence, or initial presence in those facilities listed above. Existing law prohibits the department from using a record of arrest to deny, revoke, or terminate any application, license, employment, or residence unless the department investigates the incident and secures evidence that is admissible in an administrative hearing to establish conduct by the person that may pose a risk to the health and safety of any person who is or may become a client. This bill would prohibit the department, with regard to those facilities, from issuing a criminal record clearance to a person who has violated or who has been arrested for specified crimes or for any crime for which the department is prohibited from granting a criminal record exemption prior to the department’s completion of an investigation of the incident to establish conduct by the person that may pose a risk to the health and safety of any person who is or may become a client. The bill would also require the department, subsequent to licensing but prior to a person’s employment, residence, or initial presence in a specified facility, to secure from an appropriate law enforcement agency a criminal record to determine whether a person not exempt from fingerprinting or other person, as specified, has been convicted of a crime other than a minor traffic violation, arrested for certain crimes, or for any crime for which the department cannot grant an exemption. Hide
An Act to Amend Sections 382, 399.15, 739.1, 2827, and 2827.10 Of, to Amend and Renumber Section 2827.1 Of, to Add Sections 769 and 2827.1 To, and to Repeal and Add Sections 739.9 and 745 Of, the Public Utilities Code, Relating to Energy. AB 327 (2013-2014) PereaSupportYes
Under existing law, the Public Utilities Commission has regulatory authority over public utilities, including electrical and gas corporations, as defined. Existing law authorizes the commission to… More
Under existing law, the Public Utilities Commission has regulatory authority over public utilities, including electrical and gas corporations, as defined. Existing law authorizes the commission to fix the rates and charges for every public utility, and requires that those rates and charges be just and reasonable. Existing law requires the commission to designate a baseline quantity of electricity and gas necessary to supply a significant portion of the reasonable energy needs of the average residential customer and requires that electrical and gas corporations file rates and charges, to be approved by the commission, providing baseline rates. Existing law requires the commission, in establishing the baseline rates, to avoid excessive rate increases for residential customers. Existing law requires the commission to establish a program of assistance to low-income electric and gas customers, referred to as the California Alternate Rates for Energy (CARE) program. The CARE program provides lower rates to low-income customers that are financed through a separate rate component, which is required to be a nonbypassable element of the local distribution service and collected on the basis of usage. Eligibility for the CARE program is for those electric and gas customers with annual household incomes that are no greater than 200% of the federal poverty guideline levels. Existing law revises certain prohibitions upon raising residential electrical rates adopted during the energy crisis of 2000–01, to authorize the commission to increase the rates charged residential customers for electricity usage up to 130% of the baseline quantities by the annual percentage change in the Consumer Price Index from the prior year plus 1%, but not less than 3% and not more than 5% per year. Existing law additionally authorizes the commission to increase the rates in effect for CARE program participants for electricity usage up to 130% of baseline quantities by the annual percentage increase in benefits under the CalWORKs program, as defined, not to exceed 3%, and subject to the limitation that the CARE rates not exceed 80% of the corresponding rates charged to residential customers not participating in the CARE program. Existing law states the intent of the Legislature that CARE program participants be afforded the lowest possible electric and gas rates and, to the extent possible, be exempt from additional surcharges attributable to the energy crisis of 2000–01. This bill would repeal the limitations upon increasing the electric service rates of residential customers, including the rate increase limitations applicable to electric service provided to CARE customers, but would require the commission, in establishing rates for CARE program participants, to ensure that low-income ratepayers are not jeopardized or overburdened by monthly energy expenditures and to adopt CARE rates in which the level of discount for low-income electricity and gas ratepayers correctly reflects their level of need, as determined by a specified needs assessment. The bill would require that this needs assessment be performed not less often than every 3rd year. The bill would revise the CARE program eligibility requirements to provide that for one-person households, program eligibility would be based on 2-person household guideline levels. The bill would require the commission, when establishing the CARE discounts for an electrical corporation with 100,000 or more customer accounts in California, to ensure that the average effective CARE discount be no less than 30% and no more than 35% of the revenues that would have been produced for the same billed usage by non-CARE customers and that the entire discount be provided in the form of a reduction in the overall bill for the eligible CARE customer. The bill would require that increases to rates and charges in rate design proceedings, including any reduction in the CARE discount, be reasonable and subject to a reasonable phase-in schedule relative to the rates and charges in effect prior to January 1, 2014. The bill would authorize the commission to approve new, or expand existing, fixed charges, as defined, for an electrical corporation for the purpose of collecting a reasonable portion of the fixed costs of providing service to residential customers. The bill would require the commission to ensure that any new or expanded fixed charges reasonably reflect an appropriate portion of the different costs of serving small and large customers, do not unreasonably impair incentives for conservation and energy efficiency, and do not overburden low-income and moderate-income customers. The bill would impose a $10 limit per residential customer account per month for customers not enrolled in the CARE program, would impose a $5 per month limit per residential customer account per month for customers enrolled in the CARE program, and would, beginning January 1, 2016, authorize the commission to adjust this maximum allowable fixed charge by no more than the annual percentage increase in the Consumer Price Index for the prior calendar year. The bill would authorize the commission to consider whether minimum bills are an appropriate substitute for any fixed charges. Existing law prohibits the commission from requiring or permitting an electrical corporation to do any of the following: (1) employ mandatory or default time-variant pricing, as defined, with or without bill protection, as defined, for residential customers prior to January 1, 2013, (2) employ mandatory or default time-variant pricing, without bill protection, for residential customers prior to January 1, 2014, or (3) employ mandatory or default real-time pricing, without bill protection, for residential customers prior to January 1, 2020. Existing law authorizes the commission to authorize an electrical corporation to offer residential customers the option of receiving service pursuant to time-variant pricing and to participate in other demand response programs. Existing law requires the commission to only approve an electrical corporation’s use of default time-variant pricing for residential customers, beginning January 1, 2014, if those residential customers have the option to not receive service pursuant to time-variant pricing and incur no additional charges, as specified, as a result of the exercise of that option. Existing law exempts certain customers from being subject to default time-variant pricing. This bill would delete these provisions and instead prohibit the commission from requiring or permitting an electrical corporation from employing mandatory or default time-variant pricing, as defined, for any residential customer, except that beginning January 1, 2018, the commission may require or authorize an electrical corporation to employ default time-of-use pricing to residential customers, subject to specified limitations and conditions. The bill would permit the commission to authorize an electrical corporation to offer residential customers the option of receiving service pursuant to time-variant pricing and to participate in other demand response programs. The bill would provide that a residential customer would have the option to not receive service pursuant to time-variant pricing and not incur any additional charge as a result of the exercise of that option. Unless the commission has authorized an electrical corporation to employ default time-of-use pricing, the bill would require the commission to require each electrical corporation to offer default rates to residential customers with at least 2 usage tiers and would require that the first tier include electricity usage of no less than the baseline quantity established by the commission. The bill would authorize the commission to modify the baseline seasonal definitions and applicable percentage of average consumption for one or more climate zones. Existing law requires every electric utility, defined to include an electrical corporation, local publicly owned electric utility, or an electrical cooperative, to develop a standard contract or tariff providing for net energy metering, as defined, and to make this contract or tariff available to eligible customer generators, as defined, upon request for generation by a renewable electrical generation facility, as defined. An electric utility, upon request, is required to make available to eligible customer generators contracts or tariffs for net energy metering on a first-come-first-served basis until the time that the total rated generating capacity used by eligible customer generators exceeds 5% of the electric utility’s aggregate customer peak demand. Existing law authorizes a local publicly owned electric utility to elect to instead offer co-energy metering, which uses a generation-to-generation energy and time-of-use credit formula, as specified. This bill would require a large electrical corporation, defined as an electrical corporation with more than 100,000 service connections in California, to provide net energy metering to additional eligible customer-generators in its service area through July 1, 2017, or until the corporation reaches its net energy metering program limit, as specified. The bill would require the commission, no later than December 31, 2015, to develop a standard contract or tariff for eligible customer-generators with a renewable electrical generation facility that is a customer of a large electrical corporation. In developing the standard contract or tariff for large electrical corporations, the commission would be required to take specified actions. The bill would require the large electrical corporation to offer the standard contract or tariff to an eligible customer-generator beginning July 1, 2017, or prior to that date if ordered to do so by the commission because it has reached the net energy metering program limit established for the corporation. The bill would provide that there shall be no limitation on the number of new eligible customer-generators entitled to receive service pursuant to the new standard contract or tariff developed by the commission for a large electrical corporation. Existing law provides that a fuel cell electrical generation facility is not eligible for the tariff unless it commences operation before January 1, 2015. This bill would instead provide that a fuel cell electrical generation facility is not eligible for the tariff unless it commences operation before January 1, 2017. The Public Utilities Act requires each electrical corporation, as a part of its distribution planning process, to consider specified nonutility owned distributed energy resources as an alternative to investments in its distribution system to ensure reliable electric services at the lowest possible costs. This bill would require an electrical corporation, by July 1, 2015, to submit to the commission a distribution resources plan proposal, as specified, to identify optimal locations for the deployment of distributed resources, as defined. The bill would require the commission to review each distribution resources plan proposal submitted by an electrical corporation and approve, or modify and approve, a distribution resources plan for the corporation. The bill would require that any electrical corporation spending on distribution infrastructure necessary to accomplish the distribution resources plan be proposed and considered as part of the next general rate case for the corporation and would authorize the commission to approve this proposed spending if it concludes that ratepayers would realize net benefits and the associated costs are just and reasonable. The California Renewables Portfolio Standard Program requires the Public Utilities Commission to establish a rewewables portfolio standard requiring all retail sellers, as defined, to procure a minimum quantity of electricity products from eligible renewable energy resources, as defined, at specified percentages of the total kilowatthours sold to their retail end-customers during specified compliance periods. The program additionally requires each local publicly owned electric utility, as defined, to procure a minimum quantity of electricity products from eligible renewable energy resources to achieve the targets established by the program. Existing law prohibits the commission from requiring the procurement of eligible renewable energy resources in excess of the specified quantities. This bill would authorize the commission to require a retail seller to procure eligible renewable energy resources in excess of the specified quantities. Under existing law, a violation of the Public Utilities Act or any order, decision, rule, direction, demand, or requirement of the commission is a crime. Because portions of this bill are within the act and require action by the commission to implement their requirements, a violation of these provisions would impose a state-mandated local program by creating a new crime or expanding an existing crime. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
An Act to Add Section 14105.194 to the Welfare and Institutions Code, Relating to Medi-Cal, and Declaring the Urgency Thereof, to Take Effect Immediately. AB 900 (2013-2014) AlejoSupportNo
Existing law provides for the Medi-Cal program, which is administered by the State Department of Health Care Services, under which qualified low-income individuals receive health care services. The… More
Existing law provides for the Medi-Cal program, which is administered by the State Department of Health Care Services, under which qualified low-income individuals receive health care services. The Medi-Cal program is, in part, governed and funded by federal Medicaid Program provisions. Existing law requires, except as otherwise provided, Medi-Cal provider payments to be reduced by 1% or 5%, and provider payments for specified non-Medi-Cal programs to be reduced by 1%, for dates of service on and after March 1, 2009, and until June 1, 2011. Existing law requires, except as otherwise provided, Medi-Cal provider payments and payments for specified non-Medi-Cal programs to be reduced by 10% for dates of service on and after June 1, 2011. This bill would instead require that this payment reduction not apply to skilled nursing facilities that are a distinct part of a general acute care hospital, for dates of service on or after July 1, 2013, subject to necessary federal approvals. This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as an urgency statute. Hide
An Act to Add Section 27388.1 to the Government Code, and to Add Chapter 2.5 (Commencing with Section 50470) to Part 2 of Division 31 of the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Housing, Making an Appropriation Therefor, and Declaring the Urgency Thereof, to Take Effect Immediately. SB 391 (2013-2014) DeSaulnierSupportNo
Under existing law, there are programs providing assistance for, among other things, emergency housing, multifamily housing, farmworker housing, home ownership for very low and low-income households,… More
Under existing law, there are programs providing assistance for, among other things, emergency housing, multifamily housing, farmworker housing, home ownership for very low and low-income households, and downpayment assistance for first-time homebuyers. Existing law also authorizes the issuance of bonds in specified amounts pursuant to the State General Obligation Bond Law. Existing law requires that proceeds from the sale of these bonds be used to finance various existing housing programs, capital outlay related to infill development, brownfield cleanup that promotes infill development, and housing-related parks. This bill would enact the California Homes and Jobs Act of 2013. The bill would make legislative findings and declarations relating to the need for establishing permanent, ongoing sources of funding dedicated to affordable housing development. The bill would impose a fee, except as provided, of $75 to be paid at the time of the recording of every real estate instrument, paper, or notice required or permitted by law to be recorded. By imposing new duties on counties with respect to the imposition of the recording fee, the bill would create a state-mandated local program. The bill would require that revenues from this fee be sent quarterly to the Department of Housing and Community Development for deposit in the California Homes and Jobs Trust Fund, which the bill would create within the State Treasury. The bill would provide that moneys in the fund may be expended for supporting affordable housing, administering housing programs, and the cost of periodic audits, as specified. The bill would impose certain auditing and reporting requirements. Existing law requires the Department of Industrial Relations to monitor and enforce compliance with applicable prevailing wage requirements for specified public works projects that are funded by state bond proceeds. Moneys collected for this purpose are continuously appropriated to the department from the State Public Works Enforcement Fund to cover the costs of these monitoring and enforcement duties. This bill would require the Department of Industrial Relations to monitor and enforce prevailing wage requirements for construction contracts for certain public works projects over $1,000,000, that are funded, in whole or in part, by the bill. The bill would authorize the department to charge each person or entity awarding a construction contract for the reasonable and directly related costs of the monitoring and enforcement activities, and would require the department to deposit the moneys collected into the State Public Works Enforcement Fund. The bill would exempt projects with a collective bargaining agreement with a mechanism for resolution of wage disputes from this requirement. By establishing a new source of revenue for a continuously appropriated fund, this bill would make an appropriation. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as an urgency statute. Hide
An Act to Amend Sections 20010, 20020, and 20035 Of, and to Add Article 2.5 (Commencing with Section 20016) to Chapter 5.5 of Division 8 Of, the Business and Professions Code, Relating to Franchises. SB 610 (2013-2014) JacksonOpposeNo
The California Franchise Relations Act sets forth certain requirements related to the termination, nonrenewal, and transfer of franchises between a franchisor, subfranchisor, and franchisee, as those… More
The California Franchise Relations Act sets forth certain requirements related to the termination, nonrenewal, and transfer of franchises between a franchisor, subfranchisor, and franchisee, as those terms are defined. Existing law provides that any condition purporting to bind any person to waive compliance with the act is contrary to public policy and void. This bill would provide that a condition of a franchise agreement requiring the franchisee to waive the implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing is contrary to public policy and void. The bill would prohibit a franchise agreement from restricting the right of a franchisee to join or participate in an association of franchisees to the extent the restriction is prohibited by existing law. The bill would prohibit a franchise agreement from preventing a franchisee from selling or transferring a franchise or a part of the interest of a franchise to another person, except as provided. The bill would prohibit a franchise agreement from giving a franchisee a right to sell, transfer, or assign the franchise, or a right thereunder, without the consent of the franchisor, as provided. The bill would prohibit a franchise agreement from allowing the transferring franchisee to fail to notify the franchisor of the franchisee’s decision to sell, transfer, or assign the franchise, as provided. Existing law prohibits a franchisor from terminating a franchise agreement prior to the expiration of its term, except for good cause, as defined, and upon the occurrence of specified events. This bill would prohibit a franchisor from terminating a franchise agreement prior to the expiration of its term unless there is a substantial and material breach on the part of the franchisee of a lawful requirement of the franchise agreement, except as otherwise provided. Existing law requires a franchisor that terminates or fails to renew a franchise, other than in accordance with specified provisions of law, to offer to repurchase from the franchisee the franchisee’s resalable current inventory, as specified. This bill would require a franchisor that terminates or fails to allow the sale, transfer, or assignment of a franchise, other than in accordance with specified provisions of law, to, at the election of the franchisee, either reinstate the franchisee and pay specified damages or pay to the franchisee the fair market value of the franchise and franchise assets, as provided. Hide
An Act to Amend Sections 1569.33 and 1569.335 Of, and to Add Section 1569.331 To, the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Residential Care Facilities for the Elderly. SB 895 (2013-2014) CorbettOpposeYes
(1)Existing law, the California Residential Care Facilities for the Elderly Act, provides for the licensure and regulation of residential care facilities for the elderly by the State Department of… More
(1)Existing law, the California Residential Care Facilities for the Elderly Act, provides for the licensure and regulation of residential care facilities for the elderly by the State Department of Social Services. Violation of these provisions is a misdemeanor. Existing law requires that every licensed residential care facility for the elderly be subject to unannounced visits by the department and requires the department to visit these facilities as often as necessary to ensure the quality of care provided, but no less often than once every 5 years. Existing law requires the department to notify the residential care facility for the elderly in writing of all deficiencies and to set a reasonable length of time for compliance by the facility. Existing law requires inspection reports, consultation reports, lists of deficiencies, and plans of correction to be open to public inspection. This bill would require residential care facilities for the elderly to remedy the deficiencies within 10 days of the notification, except as specified. By expanding the scope of a crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The bill would require the department to post on its Internet Web site information on how to obtain an inspection report, and would state the intent of the Legislature that the department make inspection reports available on its Internet Web site by January 1, 2020. The bill would also require the department to design, or cause to be designed, a poster that contains information on the appropriate reporting agency in case of a complaint or emergency. The bill would require a residential care facility for the elderly to post this poster in the main entryway of its facility. By expanding the scope of a crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. (2)Existing law states the intent of the Legislature that increased staffing and funding resources for the State Department of Social Services Community Care Licensing Division (CCLD) appropriated in the Budget Act of 2014 be used to enhance the CCLD’s structure and improve its operations. Existing law also states the intent of the Legislature to increase the frequency of facility inspections resulting in annual inspections for some or all facility types, including residential care facilities for the elderly. Existing law requires the State Department of Social Services, during the 2015–16 legislative budget subcommittee hearings, to update the Legislature on the status of the structural and quality enhancement improvements. This bill would require the department to also report the projected costs of conducting annual inspections of residential care facilities for the elderly beginning January 1, 2018. (3)Existing law requires the department to notify affected placement agencies and the Office of the State Long-Term Care Ombudsman whenever the department substantiates that a violation has occurred that poses a serious threat to the health and safety of any resident when the violation results in the assessment of any penalty or causes an accusation to be filed for the revocation of a license. This bill would additionally require the department to provide the Office of the State Long-Term Care Ombudsman with a precautionary notification if the department begins to prepare to issue a temporary suspension or revocation of any license. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 1182.12 of the Labor Code, Relating to Wages. SB 935 (2013-2014) LenoOpposeNo
Existing law requires that, on and after July 1, 2014, the minimum wage for all industries be not less than $9 per hour. Existing law further increases the minimum wage, on and after January 1, 2016,… More
Existing law requires that, on and after July 1, 2014, the minimum wage for all industries be not less than $9 per hour. Existing law further increases the minimum wage, on and after January 1, 2016, to not less than $10 per hour. This bill would increase the minimum wage, on and after January 1, 2015, to not less than $11 per hour, on and after January 1, 2016, to not less than $12 per hour, and on and after January 1, 2017, to not less than $13 per hour. The bill would require the automatic adjustment of the minimum wage annually thereafter, to maintain employee purchasing power diminished by the rate of inflation during the previous year. The adjustment would be calculated using the California Consumer Price Index, as specified. The bill would prohibit the Industrial Welfare Commission (IWC) from reducing the minimum wage and from adjusting the minimum wage if the average percentage of inflation for the previous year was negative. The bill would require the IWC to publicize the automatically adjusted minimum wage. The bill would provide that its provisions not be construed to preclude the IWC from increasing the minimum wage to an amount greater than the calculation would provide or to preclude or supersede an increase of the minimum wage that is greater than the state minimum wage by any local government or tribal government. The bill would apply to all industries, including public and private employment. Hide
AB 10 (2011-2012) AlejoOpposeNo
AB 1062 (2011-2012) DickinsonOpposeNo
AB 158 (2011-2012) HaldermanSupportNo
An Act to Amend Sections 20516 and 31461 of the Government Code, Relating to Public Employees’ Retirement. AB 197 (2011-2012) BuchananOpposeYes
The Public Employees’ Retirement Law establishes the Public Employees’ Retirement System (PERS) for the purpose of providing pension benefits to specified public employees. PERS is funded by… More
The Public Employees’ Retirement Law establishes the Public Employees’ Retirement System (PERS) for the purpose of providing pension benefits to specified public employees. PERS is funded by investment returns and employer and employee contributions. Existing law authorizes a contracting agency and its employees to agree in writing to share the costs of any optional benefit that is inapplicable to a contracting agency until the agency elects to be subject to the benefit. This bill would instead authorize a contracting agency and its employees to agree in writing to share the costs of the employer contribution with or without a change in benefits, as specified. The bill would prohibit an employer from using impasse procedures to impose member cost sharing on any contribution amount above that which is authorized by law. The County Employees Retirement Law of 1937 (CERL) authorizes counties and districts, as defined, to provide a system of retirement benefits to their employees. CERL defines compensation earnable for the purpose of calculating benefits as the average compensation for the period under consideration with respect to the average number of days ordinarily worked by persons in the same grade or class of positions during the period, and at the same rate of pay, as determined by the retirement board. This bill would exclude from the definition of compensation earnable any compensation determined by the board to have been paid to enhance a member’s retirement benefit. The bill would also exclude various payments from the definition of compensation earnable, including payments for unused vacation, annual leave, personal leave, sick leave, and compensatory time off, as well as payments made at the termination of employment, except what may be earned and payable in each 12-month period during the final average salary period. Hide
AB 2039 (2011-2012) SwansonOpposeNo
An Act to Amend Section 904.1 of the Code of Civil Procedure, Relating to Appeals. AB 271 (2011-2012) NestandeSupportNo
Existing law specifies the judgments and orders from which an appeal may be taken to the court of appeal. Existing law also provides that, if the consent of any person who should have been joined as… More
Existing law specifies the judgments and orders from which an appeal may be taken to the court of appeal. Existing law also provides that, if the consent of any person who should have been joined as a plaintiff cannot be obtained, the person may be made a defendant. This bill would require an appellate court to permit an appeal from an order granting or denying class action certification to join a defendant pursuant to those provisions if the petition to appeal is filed within 14 days of entry of the order. Hide
AB 40 (2011-2012) YamadaOpposeYes
An Act to Amend Section 226 Of, and to Add Article 1.5 (Commencing with Section 245) to Chapter 1 of Part 1 of Division 2 Of, the Labor Code, Relating to Employment. AB 400 (2011-2012) MaOpposeNo
Existing law authorizes employers to provide their employees paid sick leave. This bill would provide that an employee who works in California for 7 or more days in a calendar year is entitled to… More
Existing law authorizes employers to provide their employees paid sick leave. This bill would provide that an employee who works in California for 7 or more days in a calendar year is entitled to paid sick days, as defined, which shall be accrued at a rate of no less than one hour for every 30 hours worked. An employee would be entitled to use accrued sick days beginning on the 90th calendar day of employment. The bill would require employers to provide paid sick days, upon the request of the employee, for diagnosis, care, or treatment of health conditions of the employee or an employee’s family member, or for leave related to domestic violence or sexual assault. An employer would be prohibited from discriminating or retaliating against an employee who requests paid sick days. The bill would require employers to satisfy specified posting and notice and recordkeeping requirements. The bill would also make conforming changes. This bill would require the Labor Commissioner to administer and enforce these requirements, including the promulgation of regulations, investigation, mitigation, and relief of violations of these requirements. This bill would authorize the Labor Commissioner to impose specified administrative fines for violations and would authorize an aggrieved person, the commissioner, the Attorney General, or an entity a member of which is aggrieved to bring an action to recover specified civil penalties against an offender, as well as attorney’s fees, costs, and interest. The bill would specify that it does not apply to employees covered by a collective bargaining agreement that provides for paid sick days, nor does it lessen any other obligations of the employer to employees. This bill would further specify that it does not apply to employees in the construction industry covered by a collective bargaining agreement if the agreement expressly waives the requirements of this article in clear and unambiguous terms. However, the bill would specify that it applies to certain public authorities, established to deliver in-home supportive services, except where a collective bargaining agreement provides for an incremental wage increase sufficient to satisfy the bill’s requirements for accrual of sick days. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 1386 Of, and to Add Article 6.1 (Commencing with Section 1385.001) to Chapter 2.2 of Division 2 Of, the Health and Safety Code, and to Add Article 4.4 (Commencing with Section 10180.1) to Chapter 1 of Part 2 of Division 2 of the Insurance Code, Relating to Health Care Coverage. AB 52 (2011-2012) FeuerOpposeNo
Existing law, the Knox-Keene Health Care Service Plan Act of 1975, provides for the licensure and regulation of health care service plans by the Department of Managed Health Care and makes a willful… More
Existing law, the Knox-Keene Health Care Service Plan Act of 1975, provides for the licensure and regulation of health care service plans by the Department of Managed Health Care and makes a willful violation of the act a crime. Existing law provides for the regulation of health insurers by the Department of Insurance. Under existing law, no change in premium rates or coverage in a health care service plan or a health insurance policy may become effective without prior written notification of the change to the contractholder or policyholder. Existing law prohibits a health care service plan or health insurer during the term of a group plan contract or policy from changing the rate of the premium, copayment, coinsurance, or deductible during specified time periods. Existing law requires a health care service plan or health insurer that issues individual or group contracts or policies to file with the Department of Managed Health Care or the Department of Insurance specified rate information at least 60 days prior to the effective date of any rate change. This bill would further require a health care service plan or health insurer that issues individual or group contracts or policies to file with the Department of Managed Health Care or the Department of Insurance, on and after January 1, 2012, a complete rate application for any proposed rate, as defined, or rate change, and would prohibit the Department of Managed Health Care or the Department of Insurance from approving any rate or rate change that is found to be excessive, inadequate, or unfairly discriminatory. The bill would require the rate application to include certain rate information. The bill would authorize the Department of Managed Health Care or the Department of Insurance to approve, deny, or modify any proposed rate or rate change, and would authorize the Department of Managed Health Care and the Department of Insurance to review any rate or rate change that went into effect between January 1, 2011, and January 1, 2012, and to order refunds, subject to these provisions. The bill would authorize the imposition of fees on health care service plans and health insurers for purposes of implementation, for deposit into newly created funds, subject to appropriation. The bill would impose civil penalties on a health care service plan or health insurer, and subject a health care service plan to discipline, for a violation of these provisions, as specified. The bill would establish proceedings for the review of any action taken under those provisions related to rate applications and would require the Department of Managed Health Care and the Department of Insurance, and plans and insurers, to disclose specified information on the Internet pertaining to rate applications and those proceedings. The bill would require the Department of Managed Health Care or the Department of Insurance, or the court, to award reasonable advocate’s fees, including expert witness fees, and other reasonable costs in those proceedings under specified circumstances, to be paid by the plan or insurer. Because a willful violation of these provisions by a health care service plan would be a crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
AB 889 (2011-2012) AmmianoSplitNo
SB 1186 (2011-2012) SteinbergOpposeYes
An Act to Amend Section 11362.785 Of, and to Add Section 11362.787 To, the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Medical Marijuana. SB 129 (2011-2012) LenoOpposeNo
Existing law, the Compassionate Use Act of 1996, provides that a patient or a patient’s primary caregiver who possesses or cultivates marijuana for personal medical purposes of the patient upon the… More
Existing law, the Compassionate Use Act of 1996, provides that a patient or a patient’s primary caregiver who possesses or cultivates marijuana for personal medical purposes of the patient upon the written or oral recommendation or approval of a physician is not subject to conviction for offenses relating to possession and cultivation of marijuana. Existing law requires the State Department of Public Health to establish and maintain a voluntary program for the issuance of identification cards to patients qualified to use marijuana for their personal medical purposes, and to their primary caregivers, if any. Existing law states, however, that these provisions do not require any accommodation of any medical use of marijuana on the property or premises of any place of employment or during the hours of employment. This bill, notwithstanding existing law, would declare it unlawful for an employer to discriminate against a person in hiring, termination, or any term or condition of employment or otherwise penalize a person, if the discrimination is based upon the person’s status as a qualified patient or a positive drug test for marijuana, except as specified. The bill would authorize a person who has suffered discrimination in violation of the bill to institute and prosecute a civil action for damages, injunctive relief, reasonable attorney’s fees and costs, any other appropriate equitable relief, as specified, and any other relief the court may deem proper. The bill would not prohibit an employer from terminating the employment of, or taking other corrective action against, an employee who is impaired on the property or premises of the place of employment, or during the hours of employment, because of the medical use of marijuana. Hide
An Act to Add Division 16.6 (Commencing with Section 38750) to the Vehicle Code, Relating to Vehicles. SB 1298 (2011-2012) PadillaSupportYes
Existing law requires the Department of the California Highway Patrol to adopt rules and regulations that are designed to promote the safe operation of specific vehicles, including, among other… More
Existing law requires the Department of the California Highway Patrol to adopt rules and regulations that are designed to promote the safe operation of specific vehicles, including, among other things, schoolbuses and commercial motor vehicles. Existing law also requires the Department of Motor Vehicles to register vehicles that are being operated in this state and to issue a license plate to an applicant for the operation and identification of that person’s vehicle. This bill would authorize the operation of an autonomous vehicle, as defined, on public roads for testing purposes, by a driver who possesses the proper class of license for the type of vehicle being operated if specified requirements are met, including that the driver be seated in the driver’s seat, monitoring the safe operation of the autonomous vehicle, and capable of taking over immediate manual control of the autonomous vehicle in the event of an autonomous technology failure or other emergency. The bill would prohibit, except as provided for testing purposes, the operation of such a vehicle on public roads until the manufacturer submits an application to the department that includes various certifications, including a certification that the autonomous technology satisfies certain requirements, and the application is approved by the department pursuant to the regulations that the department would be required to adopt. The bill would require one of the certifications to specify that the autonomous vehicle’s technology meets Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards for the vehicle’s model year and all other applicable safety standards and performance requirements set forth in state and federal law and the regulations promulgated pursuant to those laws. The bill would require that the Department of Motor Vehicles adopt regulations as soon as practicable, but no later than January 1, 2015, setting forth requirements for the submission of evidence of insurance, surety bond, or self-insurance required by the bill and requirements for the submission or approval of an application to operate an autonomous vehicle, including any testing, equipment, or performance standards, as specified, and to hold public hearings on the adoption of any regulation applicable to the operation of an autonomous vehicle without the presence of a driver inside the vehicle. The bill would provide that federal regulations promulgated by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration supersede state law or regulation when found to be in conflict. The bill would require the department to approve an application submitted by a manufacturer upon making specified findings and would authorize the department to impose additional requirements if the application seeks approval for autonomous vehicles where there is no person in the driver’s seat. The bill would also require the department to notify the Legislature of the receipt of an application from a manufacturer seeking approval to operate an autonomous vehicle capable of operating without the presence of a driver inside the vehicle and the approval of the application. The bill would provide that approval of the application is effective no sooner than 180 days after the date the application is submitted. The department would be authorized to charge a fee for the application in an amount necessary to recover all costs reasonably incurred by the department. Hide
An Act to Add Section 3284 to the Civil Code, to Amend Sections 23004.1 and 23004.2 of the Government Code, and to Amend Section 14124.70 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, Relating to Medical Services. SB 1528 (2011-2012) SteinbergOpposeNo
Existing law establishes, as a general rule, that compensation is the relief or remedy provided by law for a violation of private rights. Existing law provides that a person suffering detriment from… More
Existing law establishes, as a general rule, that compensation is the relief or remedy provided by law for a violation of private rights. Existing law provides that a person suffering detriment from the unlawful act or omission of another may recover damages from the person at fault. Existing law provides for the Medi-Cal program, which is administered by the State Department of Health Care Services, under which qualified low-income individuals receive health care services. The Medi-Cal program is, in part, governed and funded by federal Medicaid Program provisions. Under existing law, when benefits are provided or will be provided to a Medi-Cal beneficiary for which another person or insurer is liable, the Director of Health Care Services may recover from that person or insurer the reasonable value of benefits provided, as defined and as prescribed. This bill would provide that an injured person whose health care is provided through a public or private capitated health care service plan shall be entitled to recover as damages the reasonable and necessary value of medical services. This bill would provide that a Medi-Cal beneficiary shall be entitled to recover from the person or party responsible the reasonable and necessary value of medical services. Existing law provides procedures under which, in any case in which a 3rd person is liable to pay for health services provided by a county to an injured or diseased person, the county may recover from that 3rd person or be subrogated to any right or claim that the injured or diseased person, including identified parties in interest, have against that 3rd person. Under these procedures, the county’s right of action abates during the pendency of an action brought for damages against the 3rd person by the injured or diseased person and continues as a first lien against any judgment recovered by the injured or diseased person. This bill would provide that the county’s right of action would continue under this provision as a first lien against any judgment, settlement, compromise, arbitration award, mediation settlement, or other recovery for past medical expenses obtained by the injured or diseased person. The bill would make that lien subject to any liens for attorney’s fees and costs incurred by the person or person’s representative, estate, or survivors. Existing law authorizes a county to compromise, or settle and execute a release of, any claim, as provided. Existing law also authorizes a county to waive that claim, as provided. This bill would require specified factors to be considered when a county is requested to compromise or waive any claim, as provided. This bill would also make a related statement of legislative intent regarding damages for medical services. Hide
SB 396 (2011-2012) HuffSupportNo
An Act to Add Section 1276.45 to the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Health Facilities. SB 554 (2011-2012) YeeOpposeNo
Under existing law, the Board of Registered Nursing in the Department of Consumer Affairs regulates the licensing of registered nurses. Existing law requires the State Department of Public Health to… More
Under existing law, the Board of Registered Nursing in the Department of Consumer Affairs regulates the licensing of registered nurses. Existing law requires the State Department of Public Health to license and regulate health facilities, including hospitals, and establish minimum hospital nurse-to-patient ratios by licensed nurse classification and by hospital unit. Under existing law, specified hospitals are required to adopt written policies and procedures for training and orientation of nursing staff. These provisions prohibit a registered nurse from being assigned to a nursing unit or clinical area until that nurse has received the specified orientation and demonstrated sufficient competency. A violation of these health facility provisions is a crime.This bill would require each direct care registered nurse to receive and complete an orientation to the hospital and patient care unit in which he or she will be working and to have demonstrated competency, as specified. It would preclude a nurse who has not completed this orientation and had validation of competency from being assigned direct patient care. This bill would specify that, until the nurse completes orientation and has validation of competency, he or she would not be counted as staff in computing the nurse-to-patient ratio. This bill would exempt a state inpatient mental health hospital, a state developmental center, a state veterans’ home, or a state correctional institution from those provisions of the bill requiring specified observation of the nurse. By creating a new crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
SB 558 (2011-2012) SimitianOpposeNo
An Act to Amend Section 6404.5 of the Labor Code, Relating to Employment. SB 575 (2011-2012) DeSaulnierOpposeNo
Existing law prohibits smoking of tobacco products inside an enclosed space, as defined, at a place of employment. The violation of the prohibition against smoking in enclosed spaces of places of… More
Existing law prohibits smoking of tobacco products inside an enclosed space, as defined, at a place of employment. The violation of the prohibition against smoking in enclosed spaces of places of employment is an infraction punishable by a specified fine. This bill would expand the prohibition on smoking in a place of employment to include an owner-operated business, as defined. This bill would also eliminate most of the specified exemptions that permit smoking in certain work environments, such as hotel lobbies, bars and taverns, banquet rooms, warehouse facilities, private residences used as family day care homes, and employee break rooms. By expanding the scope of an infraction, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
An Act to Amend Sections 2827 and 2827.10 of the Public Utilities Code, Relating to Energy. SB 594 (2011-2012) WolkSupportYes
Existing law relative to private energy producers requires every electric utility, as defined, to make available to an eligible customer‑generator, as defined, a standard contract or tariff for net… More
Existing law relative to private energy producers requires every electric utility, as defined, to make available to an eligible customer‑generator, as defined, a standard contract or tariff for net energy metering on a first-come-first-served basis until the time that the total rated generating capacity used by eligible customer‑generators exceeds 5% of the electric utility’s aggregate customer peak demand. Existing law requires the electric utility, upon an affirmative election by the eligible customer-generator to receive service pursuant to this contract or tariff, to either: (1) provide net surplus electricity compensation for any net surplus electricity generated in the 12-month period, or (2) allow the eligible customer-generator to apply the net surplus electricity as a credit for kilowatthours subsequently supplied by the electric utility to the surplus customer-generator. This bill would authorize an eligible customer-generator with multiple meters to elect to aggregate the electrical load of the meters located on the property where the generation facility is located and on all property adjacent or contiguous to the property on which the generation facility is located, if those properties are solely owned, leased, or rented by the eligible customer-generator, as provided. For an electric utility that is an electrical corporation, the bill would condition this authorization upon the commission making a determination that permitting eligible customer-generators to aggregate their load from multiple meters will not result in an increase in the expected revenue obligations of customers who are not eligible customer-generators. For an electric utility that is a local publicly owned electric utility or electrical cooperative, the bill would condition this authorization upon the utility’s ratemaking authority, as defined, making a determination that permitting aggregation will not result in an increase in the expected revenue obligations of customers who are not eligible customer-generators. The bill would prohibit an eligible customer-generator that chooses to aggregate from receiving net surplus electricity compensation and require the electric utility to retain kilowatthours, as prescribed. Existing law establishes a net energy metering program that is available to an eligible fuel cell customer-generator, as defined. Existing law requires that the net metering calculation be made by measuring the difference between the electricity supplied to the eligible fuel cell customer-generator and the electricity generated by the eligible fuel cell customer-generator and fed back to the electrical grid over a 12-month period. Existing law requires that an electrical corporation determine if the eligible fuel cell customer-generator was a net consumer or producer of electricity during the 12-month period. For purposes of making this determination, existing law requires that the electrical corporation aggregate the electrical load of the eligible fuel cell customer-generator under the same ownership. This bill would require that in making the determination whether the eligible fuel cell customer-generator is a net consumer or producer of electricity during the 12-month period, the electrical corporation is to aggregate the electrical load of the meters located on the property where the eligible fuel cell electrical generation facility is located and on all property adjacent or contiguous to the property on which the facility is located, if those properties are solely owned, leased, or rented by the eligible fuel cell customer-generator. Under existing law, a violation of the Public Utilities Act or any order, decision, rule, direction, demand, or requirement of the commission is a crime. Because the bill would require an expansion of the above-described net energy metering programs and would require an order or decision of the commission to implement, a violation of these provisions would impose a state-mandated local program by expanding the definition of a crime. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. This bill would incorporate additional changes in Section 2827.10 of the Public Utilities Code, proposed by AB 2165, to be operative only if AB 2165 and this bill are both chaptered and become effective on or before January 1, 2013, and this bill is chaptered last. Hide
An Act to Amend Sections 12301.25, 12301.6, and 12305.86 Of, and to Repeal Sections 12305.73 and 12305.85 Of, the Welfare and Institutions Code, Relating to Public Social Services. SB 930 (2011-2012) EvansSupportYes
Existing law provides for the county-administered In-Home Supportive Services (IHSS) program, under which qualified aged, blind, and disabled persons are provided with services in order to permit… More
Existing law provides for the county-administered In-Home Supportive Services (IHSS) program, under which qualified aged, blind, and disabled persons are provided with services in order to permit them to remain in their own homes and avoid institutionalization. Existing law authorizes services to be provided under the IHSS program either through the employment of individual providers, a contract between the county and an entity for the provision of services, the creation by the county of a public authority, or a contract between the county and a nonprofit consortium. Existing law requires a county, public authority, or nonprofit consortium, as applicable, to conduct an investigation of the qualifications and background of an IHSS provider applicant, including specified criminal background checks. This bill would require the county, public authority, or nonprofit consortium to send the State Department of Social Services a copy of the state-level criminal offender record information search response that is provided to that entity by the Department of Justice for any individual who has requested an appeal of a denial of placement on the registry of IHSS personnel or denial of eligibility to provide supportive services to an IHSS recipient. Existing law provides for the Medi-Cal program, administered by the State Department of Health Care Services, under which health care services are provided to qualified low-income persons. Under existing law, IHSS recipients who are eligible for the Medi-Cal program, are provided with personal care option services, as defined, in lieu of receiving these services under the IHSS program. Under existing law, the State Department of Social Services, in consultation with the county welfare departments, is required to develop protocols and procedures for obtaining fingerprint images of all individuals who are being assessed or reassessed to receive supportive services, as specified. Existing law also requires the standardized time provider timesheet used to track the work performed by providers of in-home supportive services to contain specified information, including, effective July 1, 2011, designated spaces for the index fingerprints of the provider and recipient. This bill would delete the requirements pertaining to obtaining fingerprint images of IHSS recipients, and the requirement that the provider timesheet include spaces for provider and recipient fingerprints. Existing law requires an IHSS provider enrollment form to be completed using the provider’s physical residence address, and prohibits the use of a post office box address. Existing law also prohibits a county from mailing a provider’s paycheck to a post office box address, unless the county approves a provider request to do so, as specified. This bill would delete these requirements, and the prohibitions relating to the use of a post office box address by an IHSS provider. Hide
An Act to Amend Sections 215 and 225.5 Of, and to Add Section 213.5 To, the Labor Code, Relating to Employment. SB 931 (2011-2012) EvansOpposeNo
Existing law prohibits an employer from issuing in payment of wages due certain instruments, including an order, check, draft, note, memorandum, scrip, coupon, card, or other acknowledgment of… More
Existing law prohibits an employer from issuing in payment of wages due certain instruments, including an order, check, draft, note, memorandum, scrip, coupon, card, or other acknowledgment of indebtedness or redeemable instrument, unless specified requirements are satisfied. This bill would authorize an employer to pay an employee’s wages by means of a payroll card, as defined, provided that specified requirements are satisfied. In addition, the bill would make a violation of its provisions a misdemeanor and would subject a violator to specified civil penalties. By creating new crimes, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 1790 of the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Continuing Care Contracts. AB 1169 (2009-2010) RuskinSplitYes
Existing law establishes the State Department of Social Services and sets forth its various powers and duties, including, but not limited to, its licensure and regulation of community care… More
Existing law establishes the State Department of Social Services and sets forth its various powers and duties, including, but not limited to, its licensure and regulation of community care facilities, including, but not limited to, residential care facilities for the elderly. Existing law provides for the regulation by the department of continuing care contracts and providers of continuing care and requires providers to submit an annual report of their financial condition. Existing law requires the report to include, among other things, a disclosure of funds accumulated for identified projects or purposes, and any funds maintained or designated for specific contingencies. Violation of certain of these provisions is a crime. This bill would require that the report also disclose funds that are expended for identified projects or purposes. The bill would also specify that the disclosure requirement includes, but is not limited to, projects designated to meet the needs of the continuing care retirement community as permitted by a provider’s nonprofit status. This bill would require a disclosure made by a nonprofit provider to state how the project or purpose is consistent with the provider’s tax-exempt status. The bill would also require a disclosure made by a for-profit provider to identify amounts accumulated for specific projects or purposes and amounts maintained for contingencies. By expanding the scope of an existing crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
An Act to Add Sections 19852.2, and 19852.4 to the Government Code, Relating to Public Employment. AB 1215 (2009-2010) De La TorreSupportNo
Existing law authorizes the Governor to require that the 40-hour workweek be worked in 4 days in any state agency or part thereof when the Governor determines that the best interests of the state… More
Existing law authorizes the Governor to require that the 40-hour workweek be worked in 4 days in any state agency or part thereof when the Governor determines that the best interests of the state would be served thereby. Existing law vests the Department of Personnel Administration with the duties and responsibilities exercised by the State Personnel Board with respect to the administration of salaries, hours, and other personnel-related matters. This bill would exempt employees of the Franchise Tax Board and employees of the State Board of Equalization from furloughs implemented by any state agencies, boards, and commissions. The bill would also prohibit a state agency, board, or commission from directly or indirectly implementing or assisting in implementing a furlough of those employees. The bill would define “employee” for the purpose of those provisions and would also specify that nothing in those provisions shall be construed as legal authorization for the imposition of furloughs on employees through Executive order. The bill would also make related findings and declarations. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 6203 of the Revenue and Taxation Code, Relating to Taxation. AB 178 (2009-2010) SkinnerOpposeNo
The Sales and Use Tax Law imposes a tax on the gross receipts from the sale in this state of, or the storage, use, or other consumption in this state of, tangible personal property. That law imposes… More
The Sales and Use Tax Law imposes a tax on the gross receipts from the sale in this state of, or the storage, use, or other consumption in this state of, tangible personal property. That law imposes the sales tax upon “retailers,” and defines a “retailer engaged in business in this state” to include specified entities. Existing law also provides that every retailer engaged in business in this state and making sales of tangible personal property for storage, use, or other consumption in this state, that engages in specified activities in this state shall, at the time of sale or at the time the storage, use, or other consumption becomes taxable, collect the tax from the purchaser. This bill would include in the definition of a “retailer engaging in business in this state” a retailer entering into an agreement with a resident of this state under which the resident, for a commission or other consideration, directly or indirectly refers potential customers, whether by a link or an Internet Web site or otherwise, to the retailer, if the cumulative gross receipts or sales price from sales by the retailer to customers in this state who are referred pursuant to these agreements is in excess of $10,000 during the preceding 4 calendar quarterly periods, except as specified. Hide
An Act to Add Sections 124121 and 124122 to the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Public Health. AB 2072 (2009-2010) MendozaOpposeNo
Existing law, the Newborn and Infant Hearing Screening, Tracking, and Intervention Act, requires every general acute care hospital with licensed perinatal services to offer every newborn a hearing… More
Existing law, the Newborn and Infant Hearing Screening, Tracking, and Intervention Act, requires every general acute care hospital with licensed perinatal services to offer every newborn a hearing screening test for the identification of hearing loss, as specified, and provide written information on the availability of community resources and services for children with hearing loss to the parents of those who are diagnosed with a hearing loss. Existing law, the California Early Intervention Services Act, commonly known as the Early Start Program, provides various early intervention services for infants and toddlers who have disabilities to enhance their development and to minimize the potential for developmental delays. This bill would also require that the State Department of Education develop an informational pamphlet, as specified, for newborns and infants identified as deaf or hard of hearing, that is about visual and auditory communication and language options and that would help a parent make informed decisions for his or her child. This bill would require the department to convene an advisory stakeholder panel, composed as prescribed, to develop and revise the informational pamphlet, as specified, until January 1, 2017. This bill would require that the informational pamphlet be provided to parents of all newborns and infants identified as deaf or hard of hearing by an audiologist immediately upon identification of a newborn or infant as deaf or hard of hearing, and by a local provider for the Early Start Program upon initial contact with the parents of a newborn or infant newly identified as deaf or hard of hearing. This bill would require the audiologist to note in the newborn’s or infant’s record that the parent has received the informational pamphlet and, during the course of evaluation and treatment, to inform and counsel the parent of all available communication options. This bill would require the informational pamphlet to be made available in Cantonese, English, Spanish, and Vietnamese, and be made available on the department’s Internet Web site, as prescribed. This bill would provide that these provisions would be implemented only upon determination by the Director of Finance that sufficient donations have been collected and deposited into the Language and Communication for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children Fund, which this bill would create in the State Treasury, and upon the appropriation of that fund. This bill would provide that no state funds shall be used to implement these provisions. This bill would also state the intent of the Legislature that every newborn or infant who does not pass his or her preliminary hearing screening test receive a followup hearing screening no later than 3 months of age, and that the Legislature strongly encourages the State Department of Health Care Services to work toward this goal. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 512 of the Labor Code, Relating to Employment. SB 287 (2009-2010) CalderonSupportNo
Existing law requires an employer to provide an employee who works more than 5 hours in a workday with a meal period of not less than 30 minutes, unless the employee works no more than 6 hours in a… More
Existing law requires an employer to provide an employee who works more than 5 hours in a workday with a meal period of not less than 30 minutes, unless the employee works no more than 6 hours in a workday and the meal period is waived by mutual consent. An employer also is required to provide an employee who works more than 10 hours in a workday with a 2nd meal period of not less than 30 minutes, unless the employee works no more than 12 hours, the first meal period was not waived, and the 2nd meal period is waived by mutual consent. The Industrial Welfare Commission (IWC) of the Department of Industrial Relations adopts and amends wage orders that, among other things, specify how meal periods are required to be provided to covered employees within various industries, including the procedures for providing employees with on-duty meal periods. This bill would revise the statutory requirements for the provision of meal periods to specify that the requirements apply only to employees subject to the meal period provisions of an order of the IWC. The statutory requirements for providing the meal periods would be revised to specify that a meal period based on working more than 5 hours in a workday is required to be provided before the employee completes 6 hours of work, unless the existing waiver provision is invoked. The waiver provision for the 2nd meal period would be changed to provide an exception for different provisions within IWC wage orders in effect as of January 1, 2009, and to permit the employer and employee to agree to waive either the first or the 2nd meal period if the employee otherwise is entitled to 2 meal periods. The bill also would specify conditions under which on-duty meal periods are permitted rather than meal periods in which the employee is relieved of all duty. The meal period provisions of a valid collective bargaining agreement would be required to be implemented for covered employees rather than the statutory requirements. The bill would require that orders of the IWC be interpreted in a manner consistent with this section, and would require the Department of Industrial Relations to amend and republish specified IWC wage orders to be consistent with the revised meal period requirements. Hide