Attorneys & law firms (Legal Affairs related)

TopicBill numbersort iconAuthorInterest positionBecame law
An Act to Amend Section 594.6 of the Penal Code, Relating to Vandalism. AB 1325 (2013-2014) PerezSupportYes
Existing law makes every person who maliciously defaces with graffiti or other inscribed material, damages, or destroys any real or personal property not his or her own guilty of vandalism and… More
Existing law makes every person who maliciously defaces with graffiti or other inscribed material, damages, or destroys any real or personal property not his or her own guilty of vandalism and punishable by imprisonment, or fine, or both imprisonment and fine, as specified. Existing law further authorizes a court to impose, as a condition of probation, community service not to exceed 300 hours over a period not to exceed 240 days upon a person who has been convicted of vandalism or affixing graffiti or other inscribed material, as specified. This bill would extend the period of time a person has to complete his or her imposed hours of community service from 240 days to one year. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 647 of the Penal Code, Relating to Disorderly Conduct. AB 1791 (2013-2014) MaienscheinSplitNo
Existing law makes it a crime to engage in specified forms of disorderly conduct, including soliciting or agreeing to engage in, or engaging in, any act of prostitution and makes that crime a… More
Existing law makes it a crime to engage in specified forms of disorderly conduct, including soliciting or agreeing to engage in, or engaging in, any act of prostitution and makes that crime a misdemeanor punishable by imprisonment in a county jail not exceeding 6 months, or by a fine not exceeding $1,000, or by both that fine and imprisonment. This bill would make that crime punishable by imprisonment in a county jail not exceeding one year, or by a fine not exceeding $2,000, or by both that fine and imprisonment, if the person who was solicited by, or who agreed to engage in or engaged in any act of prostitution with, the person who committed that crime was a minor at the time of the offense. By increasing the penalty for an existing crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
An Act to Amend Sections 1405 and 1417.9 Of, and to Add Section 1405.1 To, the Penal Code, Relating to DNA Testing. SB 980 (2013-2014) LieuSupportNo
(1)Existing law allows an incarcerated person who has been convicted of a felony to make a written motion for the performance of forensic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) testing according to a specified… More
(1)Existing law allows an incarcerated person who has been convicted of a felony to make a written motion for the performance of forensic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) testing according to a specified procedure. Existing law allows the court to order a hearing on the motion in the court’s discretion. This bill would instead allow the court to order a hearing on the motion if the court determines the convicted person has met specified requirements and that the hearing is necessary. This bill would, upon request of the convicted person or the convicted person’s counsel, allow a court to order the prosecutor to make all reasonable efforts to obtain, and police agencies and law enforcement laboratories to make all reasonable efforts to provide, copies of DNA lab reports, copies of evidence logs, and other specified documents. (2)Existing law requires notice of a motion for DNA testing to be served on the Attorney General, the district attorney in the county of conviction, and, if known, the governmental agency or laboratory holding the evidence sought to be retested. Existing law requires the response, if any, to be filed within 60 days of the date on which the Attorney General and the district attorney are served with the motion, unless a continuance is granted for good cause. This bill would extend the time for filing a response to 90 days. The bill would also allow either party to request an additional 60 days to brief certain specified issues. (3)Existing law requires a court to grant the motion for DNA testing if it determines, among other things, that the convicted person has made a prima facie showing that the evidence sought to be tested is material to the issue of the convicted persons’ identity as the perpetrator of, or accomplice to, the crime that resulted in the conviction and that the requested DNA testing results would raise a reasonable probability that, in light of all the evidence, the convicted person’s verdict or sentence would have been more favorable if the results of DNA testing had been available at the time of conviction. This bill would state that the convicted person is only required to demonstrate that the DNA testing would be relevant to, rather than dispositive of, the issue of identity and is not required to show that a favorable test result would conclusively establish his or her innocence before the court may grant a motion for DNA testing. The bill would prohibit a court, in determining whether the convicted person is entitled to develop potentially exculpatory evidence, from deciding whether, assuming a DNA test result favorable to the convicted person, he or she is entitled to some form of ultimate relief. If the court grants a motion for DNA testing and a profile of an unknown contributor is generated, the bill would allow the court to conduct a hearing to determine if the DNA profile should be uploaded into the State Index System, and if appropriate, the Federal DNA Index System, if certain conditions are met, as specified. The bill would revise the requirements that a laboratory is required to meet in order to conduct testing pursuant to a motion for DNA retesting, as specified. (4)Existing law requires the appropriate governmental entity to retain all biological material that is secured in connection with a criminal case for the period of time that any person remains incarcerated in connection with the case. Existing law allows the governmental entity to dispose of biological material before the expiration of this time period if the governmental entity notifies the inmate and his or her counsel, and the notifying entity does not receive, within 90 days of sending the notification, a motion for DNA testing, a request that the material not be destroyed because a motion for DNA testing will be filed within 180 days, or a declaration of innocence that has been filed with the court within 180 days of the judgment of conviction. This bill would allow the governmental entity to dispose of biological material before the expiration of the time that the person remains incarcerated in connection with the case if the governmental entity notifies the inmate and his or her counsel, and the notifying entity does not receive, within 180 days of sending the notification, a motion for DNA testing, a request that the material not be destroyed because a motion for DNA testing will be filed within one year, or a declaration of innocence that has been filed with the court within one year of the judgment of conviction. By increasing the duties of local governmental entities in regard to the retention of biological material, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to these statutory provisions. Hide
AB 158 (2011-2012) HaldermanOpposeNo
An Act to Amend Section 904.1 of the Code of Civil Procedure, Relating to Appeals. AB 271 (2011-2012) NestandeOpposeNo
Existing law specifies the judgments and orders from which an appeal may be taken to the court of appeal. Existing law also provides that, if the consent of any person who should have been joined as… More
Existing law specifies the judgments and orders from which an appeal may be taken to the court of appeal. Existing law also provides that, if the consent of any person who should have been joined as a plaintiff cannot be obtained, the person may be made a defendant. This bill would require an appellate court to permit an appeal from an order granting or denying class action certification to join a defendant pursuant to those provisions if the petition to appeal is filed within 14 days of entry of the order. Hide
AB 559 (2011-2012) SwansonSupportNo
An Act to Repeal and Add Section 18901.3 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, Relating to Calfresh. AB 828 (2011-2012) SwansonOpposeNo
Existing law provides for the CalFresh program, under which supplemental nutrition assistance benefits allocated to the state by the federal government are distributed to eligible individuals by each… More
Existing law provides for the CalFresh program, under which supplemental nutrition assistance benefits allocated to the state by the federal government are distributed to eligible individuals by each county. Existing law provides that a person convicted of a drug-related felony, with certain exceptions, is eligible for aid under CalFresh, if any one of specified eligibility requirements is met. This bill instead would provide that a person convicted of any drug felony shall be eligible for aid under CalFresh, eliminate the above-referenced exceptions, and make related changes. The bill would authorize the State Department of Social Services to implement its provisions through an all-county letter or similar instruction from the director. By changing the eligibility standards under CalFresh, this bill would increase the responsibilities of counties in the administration of the program, thereby imposing a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to these statutory provisions. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 11362.785 Of, and to Add Section 11362.787 To, the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Medical Marijuana. SB 129 (2011-2012) LenoSupportNo
Existing law, the Compassionate Use Act of 1996, provides that a patient or a patient’s primary caregiver who possesses or cultivates marijuana for personal medical purposes of the patient upon the… More
Existing law, the Compassionate Use Act of 1996, provides that a patient or a patient’s primary caregiver who possesses or cultivates marijuana for personal medical purposes of the patient upon the written or oral recommendation or approval of a physician is not subject to conviction for offenses relating to possession and cultivation of marijuana. Existing law requires the State Department of Public Health to establish and maintain a voluntary program for the issuance of identification cards to patients qualified to use marijuana for their personal medical purposes, and to their primary caregivers, if any. Existing law states, however, that these provisions do not require any accommodation of any medical use of marijuana on the property or premises of any place of employment or during the hours of employment. This bill, notwithstanding existing law, would declare it unlawful for an employer to discriminate against a person in hiring, termination, or any term or condition of employment or otherwise penalize a person, if the discrimination is based upon the person’s status as a qualified patient or a positive drug test for marijuana, except as specified. The bill would authorize a person who has suffered discrimination in violation of the bill to institute and prosecute a civil action for damages, injunctive relief, reasonable attorney’s fees and costs, any other appropriate equitable relief, as specified, and any other relief the court may deem proper. The bill would not prohibit an employer from terminating the employment of, or taking other corrective action against, an employee who is impaired on the property or premises of the place of employment, or during the hours of employment, because of the medical use of marijuana. Hide
SB 490 (2011-2012) HancockSupportNo
An Act to Amend Section 1170 of the Penal Code, Relating to Sentencing. SB 9 (2011-2012) YeeSplitYes
Existing law provides that the Secretary of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation or the Board of Parole Hearings, or both, may, for specified reasons, recommend to the court that a… More
Existing law provides that the Secretary of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation or the Board of Parole Hearings, or both, may, for specified reasons, recommend to the court that a prisoner’s sentence be recalled, and that a court may recall a prisoner’s sentence. This bill would authorize a prisoner who was under 18 years of age at the time of committing an offense for which the prisoner was sentenced to life without parole to submit a petition for recall and resentencing to the sentencing court, and to the prosecuting agency, as specified. The bill would prohibit a prisoner who tortured his or her victim or whose victim was a public safety official, as defined, from filing a petition for recall and resentencing. The bill would require the petition to include a statement from the defendant that includes, among other things, his or her remorse and work towards rehabilitation. The bill would establish certain criteria, at least one of which shall be asserted in the petition, to be considered when a court decides whether to conduct a hearing on the petition for recall and resentencing and additional criteria to be considered by the court when deciding whether to grant the petition. The bill would require the court to hold a hearing if the court finds that the statements in the defendant’s petition are true, as specified. The bill would apply retroactively, as specified. Hide
An Act to Amend Sections 12650, 12651, 12652, and 12654 of the Government Code, Relating to the False Claims Act. AB 1196 (2009-2010) BlumenfieldSupportYes
Existing law, the False Claims Act, provides that a person who commits any one of several enumerated acts relating to the submission to the state or a political subdivision of the state a false claim… More
Existing law, the False Claims Act, provides that a person who commits any one of several enumerated acts relating to the submission to the state or a political subdivision of the state a false claim for money, property, or services, as specified, shall be liable to the state or political subdivision for certain damages and may be liable for a civil penalty. Existing law requires the Attorney General and a prosecuting authority of a political subdivision of the state to diligently investigate specific violations of the act. Existing law also authorizes the Attorney General or the prosecuting authority of a political subdivision of the state to intervene in an action filed by a qui tam plaintiff under these provisions. Existing law authorizes a court to award a defendant its reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses under certain circumstances that include when the court finds the claim was brought solely for purposes of harassment. This bill would define terms for purposes of these provisions, expand the definition of a claim, and require the imposition of a civil penalty on a person found liable for a violation. This bill would exclude from these provisions specified claims to the Commissioner of Insurance. This bill would require the written consent of the Attorney General or prosecuting authority of a political subdivision, or both, as appropriate under the allegations of the civil action, to dismiss an action filed by a qui tam plaintiff, and would prohibit the waiver or release of specified claims except as part of a settlement of a civil action filed under these provisions. The bill would also modify the statute of limitations to commence on the date of discovery by the Attorney General or prosecuting authority of a political subdivision. This bill would modify when a court is authorized to award a defendant reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses to when the court finds the claim was brought primarily, rather than solely, for purposes of harassment. This bill would state that the Attorney General or prosecuting authority of a political subdivision has a duty to investigate specific violations of the act. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 11357 of the Health and Safety Code, and to Amend Section 23222 of the Vehicle Code, Relating to Controlled Substances. SB 1449 (2009-2010) LenoSupportYes
Existing law provides that, except as authorized by law, every person who possesses not more than 28.5 grams of marijuana, other than concentrated cannabis, is guilty of a misdemeanor and shall be… More
Existing law provides that, except as authorized by law, every person who possesses not more than 28.5 grams of marijuana, other than concentrated cannabis, is guilty of a misdemeanor and shall be punished by a fine of not more than $100. This same penalty is imposed for the crime of possessing not more than 28.5 grams of marijuana while driving on a highway or on lands, as specified. Existing law provides with respect to these offenses that, under specified conditions, (1) the court shall divert and refer the defendant for education, treatment, or rehabilitation, as specified, and (2) an arrested person who gives satisfactory evidence of identity and a written promise to appear in court shall not be subjected to booking. This bill would provide that any person who commits any of the above offenses is instead guilty of an infraction punishable by a fine of not more than $100. This bill would eliminate the above-described provisions relating to booking and to diversion and referral for education, treatment, or rehabilitation. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 12022.1 of the Penal Code, Relating to Punishment. SB 185 (2009-2010) BenoitOpposeNo
Existing law defines the felony offense for which a person has been released on bail or his or her own recognizance, or for which release on bail or his or her own recognizance has been revoked prior… More
Existing law defines the felony offense for which a person has been released on bail or his or her own recognizance, or for which release on bail or his or her own recognizance has been revoked prior to final judgment, as a “primary offense,” and defines an offense committed while so released as a “secondary offense.” Under existing law, any person arrested for a secondary offense which was alleged to have been committed while that person was released from custody on a primary offense is subject to a penalty enhancement of an additional 2 years in state prison, as specified. This bill would include within the definition of “primary offense” a felony offense for which the person has been released from custody, other than on bail or on his or her own recognizance, prior to sentencing. By expanding the application of this enhancing allegation, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 1170 of the Penal Code, Relating to Sentencing. SB 399 (2009-2010) YeeSupportNo
Existing law provides that the Secretary of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation or the Board of Parole Hearings or both may, for specified reasons, recommend to the court that a… More
Existing law provides that the Secretary of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation or the Board of Parole Hearings or both may, for specified reasons, recommend to the court that a prisoner’s sentence be recalled, and that a court may recall a prisoner’s sentence. This bill would authorize a prisoner who was under 18 years of age at the time of committing an offense for which the prisoner was sentenced to life without parole to submit a petition for recall and resentencing to the sentencing court, and to the prosecuting agency, as specified. The bill would establish certain criteria, at least one of which shall be asserted in the petition, to be considered when a court decides whether to conduct a hearing on the petition for recall and resentencing and additional criteria to be considered by the court when deciding whether to grant the petition. The bill would require the court to hold a hearing if the court finds that the defendant’s statement is true, as specified. The bill would apply retroactively, as specified. This bill would incorporate amendments to Section 1170 of the Penal Code proposed by AB 2263, contingent on the prior enactment of that bill. Hide