Steel manufacturing

TopicBill numbersort iconAuthorInterest positionBecame law
An Act to Add Sections 25150.82, 25150.84, and 25150.86 To, and to Repeal Section 25143.6 Of, the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Hazardous Waste. SB 1249 (2013-2014) HillOpposeYes
(1)The California Integrated Waste Management Act of 1989 requires materials that require special handling, as defined, to be removed from major appliances and vehicles in which they are contained… More
(1)The California Integrated Waste Management Act of 1989 requires materials that require special handling, as defined, to be removed from major appliances and vehicles in which they are contained before crushing for transport or transferring to a baler or shredder for recycling. The hazardous waste control laws prohibit a person who is not a certified appliance recycler from removing materials that require special handling from major appliances and imposes specified requirements regarding transporting, delivering, or selling discarded major appliances to a scrap recycling facility. The Department of Toxic Substances Control is authorized to grant a variance from the requirements of the hazardous waste control laws, under specified conditions and if the department makes one of specified findings. A violation of the hazardous waste control laws is a crime. This bill would authorize, until January 1, 2018, the Department of Toxic Substances Control, in consultation with the Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery, the State Water Resources Control Board, and affected local air quality management districts, to adopt regulations establishing alternative management standards for metal shredding facilities for hazardous waste management activities within the jurisdiction of the Department of Toxic Substances Control, that would apply in lieu of the hazardous waste management standards if the department performs specified actions. The bill would include among those department actions preparing a preliminary analysis and a final analysis evaluating the hazardous waste management activities to which the alternative management standards would apply. The bill would require the department to provide notice that it proposes to adopt alternative management standards. The bill would prohibit the department from adopting alternative management standards that are less stringent than applicable standards under federal law. The bill would require the disposal of treated metal shredder waste to be regulated pursuant to the hazardous waste control laws, unless the department adopts those alternative management standards, and would authorize treated metal shredder waste to be used at a specified type of disposal unit as alternative daily cover or for beneficial reuse or placed in that specified type of disposal unit, if the alternative management standards result in the treated metal shredder waste being classified as nonhazardous waste. The bill would require the department to complete the analysis of the hazardous waste management activities and the subsequent regulatory action before January 1, 2018, and would make all hazardous waste classifications and policies, procedures, or guidance issued by the department before January 1, 2014, relating to metal shredder waste or treated metal shredder waste inoperative on January 1, 2018, if the department has completed that analysis and either rescinds the conditional nonhazardous waste classification of that waste or adopts alternative management standards pursuant to this bill. Because a violation of these requirements would be a crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The bill would authorize the department to collect an annual fee from metal shredding facilities and would require the department to establish and adopt regulations necessary to administer the fee and to establish a fee schedule at a rate sufficient to cover the costs of the department to implement these provisions. The bill would establish a separate subaccount in the Hazardous Waste Control Account, and would require that the fees be deposited into the subaccount, to be available upon appropriation by the Legislature. The bill would exempt a metal shredder facility which pays this annual fee from certain hazardous waste control law fees as those fees pertain to metal shredding activities and the generation, handling, management, transportation, and disposal of metal shredder waste. (2)Existing law provides that, in general, regulations shall be adopted pursuant to the Administrative Procedure Act. Existing law requires emergency regulations be approved by the Office of Administrative Law and prohibits an emergency regulation from being in effect more than 180 days unless certain procedures are followed. The bill would authorize a regulation adopted pursuant to the above-described fee provisions to be adopted as an emergency regulation, as specified. The bill would require that such an emergency regulation be filed with, but not be repealed by, the Office of Administrative Law, and would require that the regulation remain in effect for 2 years or until revised by the department, whichever occurs sooner. (3)Existing law, on or before February 15, 1988, required specified regional water quality control boards to prepare a list of specified types of landfills that are authorized to accept and dispose of shredder waste. This bill would repeal this provision. (4)The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
An Act to Add Section 1782 to the Labor Code, Relating to Public Works. SB 7 (2013-2014) SteinbergSupportYes
Existing law requires that, except as specified, not less than the general prevailing rate of per diem wages, determined by the Director of Industrial Relations, be paid to workers employed on public… More
Existing law requires that, except as specified, not less than the general prevailing rate of per diem wages, determined by the Director of Industrial Relations, be paid to workers employed on public works projects. Existing law defines “public works” to include, among other things, construction, alteration, demolition, installation, or repair work done under contract and paid for, in whole or in part, out of public funds, and street, sewer, or other improvement work done under the direction and supervision or by the authority of any officer or public body of the state, or of any political subdivision or district thereof, whether the political subdivision or district operates under a freeholder’s charter or not. This bill would prohibit a charter city from receiving or using state funding or financial assistance for a construction project if the city has a charter provision or ordinance that authorizes a contractor to not comply with prevailing wage provisions on any public works contract. The bill would, except as specified, prohibit a charter city from receiving or using state funding or financial assistance for a construction project if the city has awarded, within the prior 2 years, a public works contract without requiring the contractor to comply with prevailing wage provisions. This bill would authorize charter cities to receive or use state funding or financial assistance if the city has a local prevailing wage ordinance, applicable to all of its public works contracts, that includes requirements that are equal to or greater than the state’s prevailing wage requirements, as specified. This bill would exclude contracts for projects of $25,000 or less for construction work, or projects of $15,000 or less for alteration, demolition, repair, or maintenance work. This bill would require the Director of Industrial Relations to maintain a list of charter cities that may receive and use state funding or financial assistance for their construction projects. This bill would provide that it does not restrict a charter city from receiving or using state funding or financial assistance that was awarded to the city prior to January 1, 2015, or from receiving or using state funding or financial assistance to complete a contract that was awarded prior to January 1, 2015, and that a charter city would not be disqualified from receiving or using state funding or financial assistance for its construction projects based on the city’s failure to require a contractor to comply with prevailing wage provisions in performing a contract the city advertised for bid or awarded prior to January 1, 2015. Hide
An Act to Add Section 2503 to the Public Contract Code, Relating to Public Contracts. SB 829 (2011-2012) RubioOpposeYes
Existing law sets forth the requirements for the solicitation and evaluation of bids and the awarding of contracts by public entities and authorizes a public entity to use, enter into, or require… More
Existing law sets forth the requirements for the solicitation and evaluation of bids and the awarding of contracts by public entities and authorizes a public entity to use, enter into, or require contractors to enter into, a project labor agreement for a construction project if the agreement includes specified taxpayer protection provisions. Existing law also provides that if a charter provision, initiative, or ordinance of a charter city prohibits the governing board’s consideration of a project labor agreement for a project to be awarded by the city, or prohibits the governing board from considering whether to allocate funds to a city-funded project covered by such an agreement, state funding or financial assistance may not be used to support that project, as specified. This bill would additionally provide that if a charter provision, initiative, or ordinance of a charter city prohibits, limits, or constrains in any way the governing board’s authority or discretion to adopt, require, or utilize a project labor agreement that includes specified taxpayer protection provisions for some or all of the construction projects to be awarded by the city, state funding or financial assistance may not be used to support any construction projects awarded by the city, as specified. Hide
SBX1 2 (2011-2012) SimitianOpposeYes
An Act to Amend Section 512 of the Labor Code, Relating to Employment. AB 569 (2009-2010) EmmersonOpposeYes
Existing law prohibits, subject to certain exceptions, an employer from requiring an employee to work more than 5 hours per day without providing a meal period and, notwithstanding that provision,… More
Existing law prohibits, subject to certain exceptions, an employer from requiring an employee to work more than 5 hours per day without providing a meal period and, notwithstanding that provision, authorizes the Industrial Welfare Commission to adopt a working condition order permitting a meal period to commence after 6 hours of work if the order is consistent with the health and welfare of affected employees. This bill would exempt from these provisions employees in a construction occupation, commercial drivers, employees in the security services industry employed as security officers, and employees of electrical and gas corporations or local publicly owned electric utilities, as defined, if those employees are covered by a valid collective bargaining agreement containing specified terms, including meal period provisions. It would specify that its provisions do not affect the requirements for meal periods for certain other employees or employers. Hide
Relative to the Colombia-United States Free Trade Agreement. AJR 27 (2009-2010) TorricoOpposeYes
This measure would urge the United States Congress to oppose a free trade agreement between the United States and Colombia.