Toiletries & cosmetics

TopicBill numbersort iconAuthorInterest positionBecame law
An Act to Add Chapter 5.9 (Commencing with Section 42360) to Part 3 of Division 30 of the Public Resources Code, Relating to Waste Management. AB 1699 (2013-2014) BloomOpposeNo
The Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986 (Proposition 65) prohibits any person, in the course of doing business, from knowingly and intentionally exposing any individual to a… More
The Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986 (Proposition 65) prohibits any person, in the course of doing business, from knowingly and intentionally exposing any individual to a chemical known to the state to cause cancer or reproductive toxicity without giving a specified warning, or from discharging or releasing such a chemical into any source of drinking water, except as specified. Existing law prohibits the sale of expanded polystyrene packaging material by a wholesaler or manufacturer. Existing law prohibits a person from selling a plastic product in this state that is labeled with the term “compostable,” “home compostable,” or “marine degradable” unless, at the time of sale, the plastic product meets the applicable American Society for Testing and Materials standard specification. This bill would prohibit, after January 1, 2019, a person, as defined, from selling or offering for promotional purposes in this state a personal care product containing synthetic plastic microbeads, as specified, unless the personal care product is an over-the-counter drug, and would prohibit a person, after January 1, 2020, from selling or offering a personal care product containing synthetic plastic microbeads, including a personal care product that is an over-the-counter drug. The bill would exempt from those prohibitions the sale or promotional offer of a product containing less than 1 part per million (ppm) by weight of synthetic plastic microbeads, as provided. The bill would make a violator liable for a civil penalty not to exceed $2,500 per day for each violation. The bill would authorize the penalty to be assessed and recovered in a civil action brought in any court of competent jurisdiction by the Attorney General or local officials, as provided. The bill would require the civil penalties collected in an action brought pursuant to the act to be retained by the office of the Attorney General or local official who brought the action. The bill would declare that its provisions occupy the whole field of regulation of the sale or offering for promotional purposes of personal care products containing synthetic plastic microbeads. The bill would prohibit a city, county, or other local public agency, on or after January 1, 2019, from adopting, enforcing, or otherwise implementing, an ordinance, resolution, regulation, or rule, or any amendment thereto, relating to the sale or offering for promotional purposes of personal care products that are not over-the-counter drugs and that contain synthetic plastic microbeads, and would prohibit a city, county, or other local public agency from taking similar actions, on or after January 1, 2020, relating to the sale or offering for promotional purposes of personal care products, including, but not limited to, over-the-counter drugs, that contain synthetic plastic microbeads, except as expressly authorized. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 653o of the Penal Code, Relating to Crimes. AB 2075 (2013-2014) AlejoSupportYes
Existing law makes it a misdemeanor, after January 1, 2015, to import into the state for commercial purposes, to possess with intent to sell, or to sell within the state, the dead body, or any part… More
Existing law makes it a misdemeanor, after January 1, 2015, to import into the state for commercial purposes, to possess with intent to sell, or to sell within the state, the dead body, or any part or product thereof, of an alligator or crocodilian species. This bill would delay the effective date of this provision until January 1, 2020. Hide
An Act to Add Section 12211.5 to the Business and Professions Code, Relating to Weights and Measures. AB 2589 (2013-2014) BloomOpposeNo
Existing law governing weights and measures provides that there is in each county the office of county sealer, as defined, of weights and measures to administer those provisions, as specified.… More
Existing law governing weights and measures provides that there is in each county the office of county sealer, as defined, of weights and measures to administer those provisions, as specified. Existing law requires a county sealer to weigh and measure packages, containers, or amounts of commodities sold, or in the process of delivery, in order to determine whether they contain the quantity or amount represented and whether they are being sold in accordance with law. In order to recover the actual costs of carrying out these provisions, this bill would authorize a county board of supervisors to charge an annual registration fee, not to exceed $640. The bill would require any adopted registration fee to be imposed only on a business location operating in the county that packs, imports, warehouses, or distributes more than 10,000 packages or containers per year that intends to sell or distribute for sale those packages or containers and to exempt any person or entity operating a business location at which both retail sales and commodity packing operations are conducted if the retail sales activities constitute the significant majority of its business operations. Hide
An Act to Amend Sections 11346.2, 11346.3, 11346.5, 11346.9, 11347.3, 11349.1, 13401, 13402, 13403, 13404, 13405, 13406, and 13407 Of, and to Add Sections 11342.548, 11346.36, and 11349.1.5 To, the Government Code, Relating to State Government. SB 617 (2011-2012) CalderonSupportYes
(1)The Administrative Procedure Act governs the procedures for the adoption, amendment, or repeal of regulations by state agencies and for the review of those regulatory actions by the Office of… More
(1)The Administrative Procedure Act governs the procedures for the adoption, amendment, or repeal of regulations by state agencies and for the review of those regulatory actions by the Office of Administrative Law. Existing law establishes procedures for notifying interested persons of the proposed adoption, amendment, or repeal of a regulation. Existing law establishes procedures a state agency is required to use to make a determination of whether a proposed administrative regulation or proposed amendment to an administrative regulation has the potential for significant, statewide adverse economic impact directly affecting California business enterprises. This bill would revise various provisions of the act with respect to the duties of the Office of Administrative Law and state agencies in the adoption, amendment, or repeal of regulations. The bill would also require each state agency to prepare a standardized regulatory impact analysis, as specified, with respect to the adoption, amendment, or repeal of a major regulation, as defined, that is proposed on or after November 1, 2013. The bill would require that the agency submit the analysis to the Department of Finance for review and comments, as specified, which would be required to be included with the notice of proposed action. This bill would require the Department of Finance, in consultation with other state entities, to adopt regulations for conducting the standardized regulatory impact analyses, as specified, to be utilized by state agencies when promulgating major regulations pursuant to the act, and, in particular, in developing the standardized regulatory impact analysis. The bill would require, on or before November 1, 2013, the department to submit these adopted regulations to the Senate and Assembly Committees on Governmental Organization and publish the adopted regulations in the State Administrative Manual. (2)The Financial Integrity and State Manager’s Accountability Act of 1983 provides that state agency heads are responsible for the establishment and maintenance of a system or systems of internal accounting and administrative control within their agencies, as specified. This bill would require that effective, independent, and ongoing monitoring of the internal accounting and administrative controls of state agencies be included within that system or systems. (3)The act requires that the Director of Finance establish a general framework to guide state agencies in conducting internal reviews of their systems of internal accounting and administrative controls. This bill would require that the Director of Finance also establish a general framework of recommended practices to guide state agencies in conducting active ongoing monitoring of processes for internal accounting and administrative control. Hide
An Act to Add Division 24 (Commencing with Section 81000) to the Food and Agricultural Code, and to Amend Section 11018 Of, and to Add Section 11018.5 To, the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Industrial Hemp. SB 676 (2011-2012) LenoSupportNo
Existing law makes it a crime to engage in any of various transactions relating to marijuana, as defined, except as otherwise authorized by law, such as the Medical Marijuana Program. For the… More
Existing law makes it a crime to engage in any of various transactions relating to marijuana, as defined, except as otherwise authorized by law, such as the Medical Marijuana Program. For the purposes of these provisions, marijuana is defined as not including the mature stalks of the plant, fiber produced from the stalks, oil or cake made from the seeds of the plant, any other compound, manufacture, salt, derivative, mixture, or preparation of the mature stalks, except the resin extracted therefrom, and fiber, oil, or cake, or the sterilized seed of the plant which is incapable of germination. This bill would revise the definition of “marijuana” so that the term would exclude industrial hemp, as defined, except where the plant is cultivated or processed for purposes not expressly allowed. The bill would define industrial hemp as a fiber or oilseed crop, or both, that is limited to the nonpsychoactive types of the plant Cannabis sativa L. and the seed produced therefrom, having no more than 310 of 1% tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) contained in the dried flowering tops, and that is cultivated and processed exclusively for the purpose of producing the mature stalks of the plant, fiber produced from the stalks, oil or cake made from the seeds of the plant, any other compound, manufacture, salt, derivative, mixture, or preparation of the mature stalks, except the resin or flowering tops extracted therefrom, fiber, oil, or cake, or the sterilized seed of the plant which is incapable of germination. The bill would enact certain provisions relating to growing industrial hemp which would apply only in Imperial, Kern, Kings, and San Joaquin Counties, except when grown by an established agricultural institution, and which would be operative only until January 1, 2020. The bill would require industrial hemp to be cultivated only from seeds imported in accordance with laws of the United States or from seeds grown in California from industrial hemp plants or grown from industrial hemp plants grown by an established agricultural research institution. The bill would require, except as specified, the person growing the industrial hemp to obtain, prior to the harvest of each crop, a laboratory test of a random sample of the crop to determine the amount of THC in the crop. The bill would require that samples to perform the testing be taken in the presence of, and be collected and transported only by, an employee or agent of a laboratory that is registered with the federal Drug Enforcement Administration. The bill would require that the test report contain specified language, that the testing laboratory provide not less than 10 original signed copies to the cultivator, and that the testing laboratory and cultivator retain an original signed copy for a minimum of 2 years. The report would be required to be made available to law enforcement officials and provided to purchasers, as specified. The bill would require all industrial hemp seed sold for planting in California to be from a crop having no more than 310 of 1% THC contained in a random sampling of the dried flowering tops and tested under these provisions, and would require the destruction of crops exceeding that content, as specified. The bill would provide that growing industrial hemp shall not be construed to authorize the possession, outside of a field of lawful cultivation, of resin, flowering tops, or leaves that have been removed from the hemp plant, except to perform required testing by an employee or agent of the testing laboratory or any cultivation of the industrial hemp plant that is not grown by an established agricultural research institution. This bill would require the Attorney General and the Hemp Industries Association to submit reports to the Legislature by January 1, 2018, regarding the economic and law enforcement impacts of industrial hemp cultivation. The bill would state the findings and declarations of the Legislature relating to industrial hemp. By revising the scope of application of existing crimes relating to marijuana, this bill would impose a state‑mandated local program. By specifying the conditions of cultivation, the violation of which would be a misdemeanor pursuant to other provisions of existing law, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
SB 977 (2011-2012) YeeSupportNo
An Act to Add Article 10.10 (Commencing with Section 25219.5) to Chapter 6.5 of Division 20 of the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Consumer Product Safety. SB 928 (2009-2010) SimitianOpposeNo
Existing law regulates the labeling and use of various consumer products, including toys and toxic household products. Existing law, administered by the Department of Toxic Substances Control,… More
Existing law regulates the labeling and use of various consumer products, including toys and toxic household products. Existing law, administered by the Department of Toxic Substances Control, prohibits the management of hazardous waste, except in accordance with the hazardous waste laws or the regulations adopted by the department. A violation of these laws is a crime. This bill would prohibit the manufacture, sale, or distribution of a designated consumer product, as defined, unless the manufacturer discloses each ingredient, as defined, contained in the product, identified in a prescribed manner, by posting that information on the manufacturer’s Internet Web site, and provides the Web site and page address on the product label, along with a prescribed statement. The bill would, under specified circumstances, allow nondisclosure of ingredients defined as trade secrets.Existing law requires the department to establish the Toxics Information Clearinghouse, to provide a decentralized, Web-based system for the collection, maintenance, and distribution of specific chemical hazard trait and environmental and toxicological end-point data. This bill would specify that it does not limit, supersede, duplicate, or otherwise conflict with the authority of the department to fully implement prescribed provisions relating to the operation of the clearinghouse.The bill would declare that its provisions are severable and if any provision of the bill is held invalid, that invalidity would not affect other provisions or applications that can be given effect without the invalid provision or application. By creating a new crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide