Freight & delivery services

TopicBill numbersort iconAuthorInterest positionBecame law
An Act to Amend Section 365.1 Of, to Add Section 395.5 To, and to Add and Repeal Section 769.1 Of, the Public Utilities Code, Relating to Electricity. SB 286 (2015-2016) HertzbergSupportNo
The Public Utilities Act requires the Public Utilities Commission, pursuant to electrical restructuring, to authorize and facilitate direct transactions between electricity suppliers and retail… More
The Public Utilities Act requires the Public Utilities Commission, pursuant to electrical restructuring, to authorize and facilitate direct transactions between electricity suppliers and retail end-use customers. Existing law, enacted during the energy crisis of 2000–01, authorized the Department of Water Resources, until January 1, 2003, to enter into contracts for the purchase of electricity, and to sell electricity to retail end-use customers at not more than the department’s acquisition costs and to recover those costs through the issuance of bonds to be repaid by ratepayers. That law suspended the right of retail end-use customers, other than community choice aggregators and a qualifying direct transaction customer, as defined, to acquire service through a direct transaction until the Department of Water Resources no longer supplies electricity under that law. Existing law continues the suspension of direct transactions except as expressly authorized, until the Legislature, by statute, repeals the suspension or otherwise authorizes direct transactions. Existing law requires the commission to authorize direct transactions for nonresidential end-use customers subject to a reopening schedule that will phase in over a period of not less than 3 years and not more than 5 years, and is subject to an annual maximum allowable total kilowatthour limit established, as specified, for each electrical corporation. The California Renewables Portfolio Standard Program requires a retail seller, as defined, and local publicly owned electric utilities to purchase specified minimum quantities of electricity products from eligible renewable energy resources, as defined, for specified compliance periods. The program, consistent with the goals of procuring the least-cost and best-fit eligible renewable energy resources that meet project viability principles, requires that all retail sellers procure a balanced portfolio of electricity products from eligible renewable energy resources, meeting specified portfolio content categories. This bill would require the commission to adopt and implement a schedule that implements a 2nd phase-in period for expanding direct transactions for individual retail nonresidential end-use customers over a period of not more than 3 years, raising the allowable limit of kilowatthours that can be supplied by other providers in each electrical corporation’s distribution service territory by that electrical corporation’s share of an aggregate of 8,000 gigawatthours, apportioned as specified. The bill would require that 75% of an electric service provider’s retail sales associated with each 2nd phase direct transaction to be procured from eligible renewable energy resources during 2016, increasing to 100% by December 31, 2020, and would require the commission to enforce the bill’s renewables procurement requirements as part of the California Renewables Portfolio Standard Program. The bill would require nonresidential retail end-use customers engaging in direct transactions to be responsible for their proportionate share of the costs of specified programs. The bill would require that an electrical corporation continue to construct, own, and operate distribution system equipment, as specified, and continue to provide support functions, as specified, through its own employees, except that construction of distribution system equipment and line clearance tree trimming may be performed under contract. The bill would prohibit an electric service provider from offering full consolidated billing beginning January 1, 2016. Under existing law, a violation of the Public Utilities Act or any order, decision, rule, direction, demand, or requirement of the commission is a crime. Because the provisions of this bill would be a part of the act and because a violation of an order or decision of the commission implementing its requirements would be a crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program by expanding the operation of a crime. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
An Act to Amend Sections 245.5, 246, and 1182.12 of the Labor Code, Relating to Labor. SB 3 (2015-2016) LenoOpposeYes
(1)Under existing law, the Healthy Workplaces, Healthy Families Act of 2014, an employee who, on or after July 1, 2015, works in California for the same employer for 30 or more days within a year… More
(1)Under existing law, the Healthy Workplaces, Healthy Families Act of 2014, an employee who, on or after July 1, 2015, works in California for the same employer for 30 or more days within a year from the commencement of employment is entitled to paid sick days, as specified. Existing law requires an employee to accrue paid sick days at the rate of not less than one hour per every 30 hours worked subject to specified use and accrual limitations. For the purposes of the act, an “employee” does not include a provider of in-home supportive services, as described. This bill, on and after July 1, 2018, would entitle a provider of in-home supportive services who works in California for 30 or more days within a year from the commencement of employment to paid sick days, subject to specified full amount of leave time amounts and that rate of accrual. The bill would require the State Department of Social Services, in consultation with stakeholders, to convene a workgroup to implement paid sick leave for in-home supportive services providers and to issue guidance in that regard by December 1, 2017. The bill would authorize the department to implement that paid sick leave without complying with the Administrative Procedure Act. (2)On and after July 1, 2014, existing law requires the minimum wage for all industries to be not less than $9 per hour. On and after January 1, 2016, existing law requires the minimum wage for all industries to be not less than $10 per hour. This bill would require the minimum wage for all industries to not be less than specified amounts to be increased from January 1, 2017, to January 1, 2022, inclusive, for employers employing 26 or more employees and from January 1, 2018, to January 1, 2023, inclusive, for employers employing 25 or fewer employees, except when the scheduled increases are temporarily suspended by the Governor, based on certain determinations. The bill would also require the Director of Finance, after the last scheduled minimum wage increase, to annually adjust the minimum wage under a specified formula. On or before July 28, 2017, and on or before every July 28 thereafter until the minimum wage is a specified amount for employers employing 26 or more employees, the bill would require the Director of Finance to annually determine, based on certain factors, whether economic conditions can support a scheduled minimum wage increase and certify that determination to the Governor and the Legislature. The bill would also require the State Board of Equalization to publish specified retail sales and use tax information on its Internet Web site to be used by the Director of Finance in making that determination. On or before July 28, 2017, and on or before every July 28 thereafter until the minimum wage is a specified amount for employers employing 26 or more employees, in order to ensure that the General Fund can support the next scheduled minimum wage increase, the bill would also require the Director of Finance to annually determine and certify to the Governor and the Legislature whether the General Fund would be in a deficit in the current fiscal year, or in either of the following 2 fiscal years. Hide
An Act to Add Section 44258.5 to the Health and Safety Code, to Amend Section 1720 of the Labor Code, to Amend Sections 25310 and 25943 Of, and to Add Sections 25302.2 and 25327 To, the Public Resources Code, and to Amend Sections 359, 399.4, 399.11, 399.12, 399.13, 399.15, 399.16, 399.18, 399.21, 399.30, 454.55, 454.56, 701.1, 740.8, 9505, and 9620 Of, to Amend and Repeal Sections 337 and 352 Of, to Add Sections 237.5, 365.2, 366.3, 454.51, 454.52, 740.12, 9621, and 9622 To, to Add Article 17 (Commencing with Section 400) to Chapter 2.3 of Part 1 of Division 1 Of, to Add and Repeal Article 5.5 (Commencing with Section 359.5) of Chapter 2.3 of Part 1 of Division 1 Of, and to Repeal Article 5 (Commencing with Section 359) of Chapter 2.3 of Part 1 of Division 1 Of, the Public Utilities Code, Relating to Energy. SB 350 (2015-2016) De LeonOpposeYes
(1)Under existing law, the Public Utilities Commission (PUC) has regulatory jurisdiction over public utilities, including electrical corporations, community choice aggregators, and electric service… More
(1)Under existing law, the Public Utilities Commission (PUC) has regulatory jurisdiction over public utilities, including electrical corporations, community choice aggregators, and electric service providers, while local publicly owned electric utilities are under the direction of their governing boards. Existing law imposes various regulations on public utilities and local publicly owned electric utilities. Existing law establishes the California Renewables Portfolio Standards (RPS) Program, which is codified in the Public Utilities Act, with the target to increase the amount of electricity generated per year from eligible renewable energy resources to an amount that equals at least 33% of the total electricity sold to retail customers per year by December 31, 2020. Under existing law, a violation of the Public Utilities Act is a crime. This bill would require that the amount of electricity generated and sold to retail customers per year from eligible renewable energy resources be increased to 50% by December 31, 2030, as provided. The bill would make other revisions to the RPS Program and to certain other requirements on public utilities and publicly owned electric utilities. Because certain of the above provisions are codified in the Public Utilities Act, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program by expanding the definition of a crime or establishing a new crime. (2)Existing law requires the PUC to identify cost-effective electricity efficiency savings and establish efficiency targets for an electrical corporation to achieve, and to identify cost-effective natural gas efficiency savings and establish efficiency targets for a gas corporation to achieve. Existing law requires a local publicly owned electric utility to identify all potential achievable cost-effective electricity efficiency savings and to establish annual targets for energy efficiency savings and demand reduction for the next 10-year period. This bill would require the State Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission to establish annual targets for statewide energy efficiency savings and demand reduction that will achieve a cumulative doubling of statewide energy efficiency savings in electricity and natural gas final end uses of retail customers by January 1, 2030. The bill would require the PUC to establish efficiency targets for electrical and gas corporations consistent with this goal. The bill would require local publicly owned electric utilities to establish annual targets for energy efficiency savings and demand reduction consistent with this goal. (3)The existing restructuring of the electrical industry within the Public Utilities Act provides for the establishment of the Independent System Operator (ISO) and requires the ISO to ensure efficient and reliable operation of the electrical transmission grid. Existing law prohibits the ISO from entering into a multistate entity or regional organization unless the ISO receives approval from the Electricity Oversight Board. Existing law states the intent of the Legislature to provide for the evolution of the ISO into a regional organization to promote the development of regional electricity transmission markets in the western states. This bill would provide for the transformation of the ISO into a regional organization, with the approval of the Legislature, pursuant to a specified process. (4)The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
An Act to Amend Sections 64, 480.1, 480.2, and 482 Of, and to Add Sections 480.9, 486, 486.5, and 488 To, the Revenue and Taxation Code, Relating to Taxation, to Take Effect Immediately, Tax Levy. AB 188 (2013-2014) AmmianoOpposeNo
The California Constitution generally limits ad valorem taxes on real property to 1% of the full cash value of that property. For purposes of this limitation, “full cash value” is defined as the… More
The California Constitution generally limits ad valorem taxes on real property to 1% of the full cash value of that property. For purposes of this limitation, “full cash value” is defined as the assessor’s valuation of real property as shown on the 1975–76 tax bill under “full cash value” or, thereafter, the appraised value of that real property when purchased, newly constructed, or a change in ownership has occurred. Existing property tax law specifies those circumstances in which the transfer of ownership interests in a corporation, partnership, limited liability company, or other legal entity results in a change in ownership of the real property owned by that entity, and generally provides that a change in ownership as so described occurs if a legal entity or other person obtains a controlling or majority ownership interest in the legal entity. Existing law also specifies other circumstances in which certain transfers of ownership interests in legal entities result in a change in ownership of the real property owned by those legal entities. This bill would instead specify that if 100% of the ownership interests in a legal entity, as defined, are sold or transferred in a single transaction, as specified, the real property owned by that legal entity has changed ownership, whether or not any one legal entity or person that is a party to the transaction acquires more than 50% of the ownership interests. The bill would require the State Board of Equalization to notify assessors if a change in ownership as so described occurs. Existing law requires a person or legal entity that obtains a controlling or majority ownership interest in a legal entity, or an entity that makes specified transfers of ownership interests in the legal entity, to file a change in ownership statement signed under penalty of perjury with the State Board of Equalization, as specified. Existing law requires a penalty of 10% of the taxes applicable to the new base year value, as specified, or 10% of the current year’s taxes on the property, as specified, to be added to the assessment made on the roll if a person or legal entity required to file a change in ownership statement fails to do so. This bill would require a person or legal entity acquiring ownership interests in a legal entity, if 100% of the ownership interests in the legal entity are sold or transferred, as described above, to file a change in ownership statement signed under penalty of perjury with the State Board of Equalization. This bill would increase the penalties for failure to file a change in ownership statement, as described above, from 10% to 20%. This bill would also require a person or legal entity that acquires the ownership interest of a legal entity to report the change in ownership interests to the State Board of Equalization if any change in the ownership interests in a legal entity holding an interest in real property in this state occurs, as provided. This bill would require a legal entity to report subsequent changes in the ownership interests of the legal entity to the county assessor if a specified transfer between an individual or individuals and a legal entity or between legal entities occurs, as provided. This bill would also require a deed to be recorded with the county recorder by the owner of the real property, even if the owner of the real property does not change, if a change of an ownership interest in a legal entity holding an interest in real property occurs. By expanding the crime of perjury and by imposing new duties upon local county officials with respect to changes in ownership, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that with regard to certain mandates no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. With regard to any other mandates, this bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs so mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above. This bill would include a change in state statute that would result in a taxpayer paying a higher tax within the meaning of Section 3 of Article XIIIA of the California Constitution, and thus would require for passage the approval of 23 of the membership of each house of the Legislature. This bill would take effect immediately as a tax levy. Hide