Native American tribes & governing units

TopicBill numberAuthorsort iconInterest positionBecame law
An Act to Amend Section 13350 of the Water Code, Relating to Water Quality, Making an Appropriation Therefor, and Declaring the Urgency Thereof, to Take Effect Immediately. AB 1 (2013-2014) AlejoSupportNo
Under existing law, the State Water Resources Control Board and the California regional water quality control boards prescribe waste discharge requirements in accordance with the federal Clean Water… More
Under existing law, the State Water Resources Control Board and the California regional water quality control boards prescribe waste discharge requirements in accordance with the federal Clean Water Act and the Porter-Cologne Water Quality Control Act, referred to as the state act. The state act imposes various penalties for a violation of its requirements. The state act requires specified penalties be deposited into the Waste Discharge Permit Fund and separately accounted. The state act requires moneys in the fund, upon appropriation by the Legislature, to be expended by the state board to assist regional boards and prescribed other public agencies in cleaning up or abating the effects of waste on waters of the state or to assist a regional board attempting to remedy a significant unforeseen water pollution problem. This bill would appropriate $2,000,000 from the fund to the state board for use by the Greater Monterey County Regional Water Management Group, referred to as the management group, to develop an integrated plan to address the drinking water and wastewater needs of disadvantaged communities in the Salinas Valley whose waters have been affected by waste discharges, thereby making an appropriation. The bill would require the management group to consult with specified entities and to submit to the Legislature by January 1, 2016, the plan developed by the group. This bill would make legislative findings and declarations as to the necessity of a special statute for Monterey County. This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as an urgency statute. Hide
An Act to Add Section 116760.46 to the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Drinking Water, and Making an Appropriation Therefor. AB 21 (2013-2014) AlejoSupportYes
Existing law establishes the Safe Drinking Water State Revolving Fund, which is continuously appropriated to the department for the provision of grants and revolving fund loans to provide for the… More
Existing law establishes the Safe Drinking Water State Revolving Fund, which is continuously appropriated to the department for the provision of grants and revolving fund loans to provide for the design and construction of projects for public water systems that will enable suppliers to meet safe drinking water standards. Existing law requires the department to establish criteria to be met for projects to be eligible for consideration for this funding. This bill would authorize the department to assess a specified annual charge in lieu of interest on loans for water projects made pursuant to the Safe Drinking Water State Revolving Fund, and deposit that money into the Safe Drinking Water Small Community Emergency Grant Fund, which the bill would create in the State Treasury. The bill would limit the grant fund to a maximum of $50,000,000. The bill would authorize the department to expend the money for grants for specified water projects that serve disadvantaged and severely disadvantaged communities, thereby making an appropriation. Hide
An Act to Amend Sections 2851 and 2852 of the Public Utilities Code, Relating to Energy. AB 217 (2013-2014) BradfordSupportYes
Under existing law, the Public Utilities Commission has regulatory authority over public utilities, including electrical corporations. Decisions of the commission adopted the California Solar… More
Under existing law, the Public Utilities Commission has regulatory authority over public utilities, including electrical corporations. Decisions of the commission adopted the California Solar Initiative administered by the state’s 3 largest electrical corporations and subject to the commission’s supervision. Existing law requires the commission to ensure that not less than 10% of the funds for the California Solar Initiative are utilized for the installation of solar energy systems, as defined, on low-income residential housing, as defined. Pursuant to this requirement, the commission adopted decisions that established the Single-Family Affordable Solar Homes Program (SASH) and the Multifamily Affordable Solar Housing Program (MASH), pursuant to which the electrical corporations provide monetary incentives for the installation of solar energy systems on low-income residential housing. The SASH and MASH programs will operate until December 31, 2016, or until funds collected for the above purposes are exhausted, whichever occurs sooner. This bill would, upon the expenditure or reservation of those funds reserved for low-income residential housing, authorize the surcharge collected by the electrical corporations for the California Solar Initiative to continue to provide funding for the administration of the SASH and MASH programs. The bill would require the commission to ensure the total amount resulting from the continued collection of the charge does not exceed $108,000,000. The bill would extend the operation of the SASH and MASH programs to December 31, 2021, or until the exhaustion of that amount, whichever occurs sooner. The bill would require the SASH and MASH programs to meet specified requirements. The bill would make legislative findings and declarations that it is the goal of the state to install solar energy systems that have a generating capacity equivalent to 50 megawatts for low-income residential housing and that the commission designs a program that maximizes the overall benefit to ratepayers. Because a violation of any order, decision, rule, direction, demand, or requirement of the commission is a crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program by extending the application of a crime. This bill would incorporate additional changes in Section 2851 of the Public Utilities Code proposed in AB 102, SB 72, SB 84, and SB 96, to become operative if either AB 102, SB 72, SB 84, or SB 96, or any combination of those bills, and this bill become effective on or before January 1, 2014, and this bill is enacted last. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
SB 40 (2011-2012) CorreaOpposeNo
An Act to Amend Sections 65352 and 65352.5 Of, and to Add Section 65350.5 To, the Government Code, and to Amend Sections 348, 1120, 1552, 1831, 10721, 10726.4, and 10726.8 Of, to Add Sections 1529.5 and 10726.9 To, to Add Part 5.2 (Commencing with Section 5200) to Division 2 Of, and to Add Chapter 7 (Commencing with Section 10729), Chapter 8 (Commencing with Section 10730), Chapter 9 (Commencing with Section 10732), Chapter 10 (Commencing with Section 10733), and Chapter 11 (Commencing with Section 10735) to Part 2.74 of Division 6 Of, the Water Code, Relating to Groundwater. AB 1739 (2013-2014) DickinsonSupportYes
(1)Existing law authorizes local agencies to adopt and implement a groundwater management plan. Existing law requires a groundwater management plan to contain specified components and requires a… More
(1)Existing law authorizes local agencies to adopt and implement a groundwater management plan. Existing law requires a groundwater management plan to contain specified components and requires a local agency seeking state funds administered by the Department of Water Resources for groundwater projects or groundwater quality projects to do certain things, including, but not limited to, preparing and implementing a groundwater management plan that includes basin management objectives for the groundwater basin. This bill would provide specific authority to a groundwater sustainability agency, as defined in SB 1168 of the 2013–14 Regular Session, to impose certain fees. The bill would authorize the department or a groundwater sustainability agency to provide technical assistance to entities that extract or use groundwater to promote water conservation and protect groundwater resources. This bill would require the department, by January 1, 2017, to publish on its Internet Web site best management practices for the sustainable management of groundwater, and would require the department to prepare and release a report by December 31, 2016, on the department’s best estimate of water available for replenishment of groundwater in the state. This bill would require a groundwater sustainability agency to submit a groundwater sustainability plan to the department for review upon adoption. This bill would require the department to periodically review groundwater sustainability plans, and by June 1, 2016, would require the department to adopt certain regulations. This bill would authorize a local agency to submit to the department for evaluation and assessment an alternative that the local agency believes satisfies the objectives of these provisions. This bill would require the department to review any of the above-described submissions at least every 5 years after initial submission to the department. This bill would authorize the board to conduct inspections and would authorize the board to obtain an inspection warrant. Because the willful refusal of an inspection lawfully authorized by an inspection warrant is a misdemeanor, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program by expanding the application of a crime. This bill would authorize the board to designate a basin as a probationary basin if the board makes a certain determination. This bill would authorize the board to develop an interim plan for a probationary basin if the board, in consultation with the department, determines that a local agency has not remedied a deficiency that resulted in designating the basin as a probationary basin within a certain timeframe. This bill would authorize the board to adopt an interim plan for a probationary basin after notice and a public hearing and would require state entities to comply with an interim plan. This bill would specifically authorize the board to rescind all or a portion of an interim plan if the board determines at the request of specified petitioners that a groundwater sustainability plan or adjudication action is adequate to eliminate the condition of long-term overdraft or condition where groundwater extractions result in significant depletions of interconnected surface waters. This bill would provide that the board has authority to stay its proceedings relating to an interim plan or to rescind or amend an interim plan based on the progress made by a groundwater sustainability agency or in an adjudication action. (2)Existing law establishes the Water Rights Fund, which consists of various fees and penalties. The moneys in the Water Rights Fund are available, upon appropriation by the Legislature, for, among other things, the administration of the State Water Resource Control Board’s water rights program. This bill would provide that the moneys in the Water Rights Fund are available for expenditure, upon appropriation by the Legislature, for the purpose of state board enforcement of the provisions of this bill. This bill would require the board to adopt a schedule of fees in an amount sufficient to recover all costs incurred and expended from the Water Rights Fund by the board for this bill. Under existing law, a person who violates a cease and desist order of the board may be liable in an amount not to exceed $1,000 for each day in which the violation occurs. Revenue generated from these penalties is deposited in the Water Rights Fund. This bill would authorize the board to issue a cease and desist order in response to a violation or threatened violation of any decision or order of the board or any extraction restriction, limitation, order, or regulation adopted or issued under the provisions of this bill. (3)Existing law, with certain exceptions, requires each person who diverts water after December 31, 1965, to file with the State Water Resources Control Board a prescribed statement of diversion and use. Existing law subjects a person to civil liability if that person fails to file, as required, a diversion and use statement for a diversion or use that occurs after January 1, 2009, tampers with any measuring device, or makes a material misstatement in connection with the filing of a diversion or use statement. Existing law provides that the making of any willful misstatement in connection with these provisions is a misdemeanor punishable as prescribed. This bill would establish groundwater reporting requirements for a person extracting groundwater in an area within a basin that is not within the management area of a groundwater sustainability agency or a probationary basin. The bill would require the reports to be submitted to the board or, in certain areas, to an entity designated as a local agency by the board, as specified. This bill would require each report to be accompanied by a specified fee. This bill would apply the above-described criminal and civil liability provisions to a report or measuring device required by this reporting requirement. By expanding the definition of a crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. Existing law authorizes the board or the Department of Water Resources to adopt emergency regulations providing for the filing of reports of water diversion or use that are required to be filed. This bill would authorize the board or the department to adopt emergency regulations providing for the filing of reports of water extraction. (4)Existing law requires the legislative body of each county and city to adopt a comprehensive, long-term general plan for the physical development of the county or city with specified elements, including, among others, land use and conservation elements. Existing law requires a city or county, upon the adoption or revision of its general plan, on or after January 1, 1996, to utilize as a source document any urban water management plan submitted to the city or county by a water agency. This bill would require, prior to the adoption or any substantial amendment of a general plan, the planning agency to review and consider a groundwater sustainability plan, groundwater management plan, groundwater management court order, judgment, or decree, adjudication of water rights, or a certain order or interim plan by the State Water Resources Control Board. This bill would require the planning agency to refer a proposed action to adopt or substantially amend a general plan to any groundwater sustainability agency that has adopted a groundwater sustainability plan or local agency that otherwise manages groundwater and to the State Water Resources Control Board if it has adopted an interim plan that includes territory within the planning area. Existing law requires a public water system to provide a planning agency with certain information upon receiving notification of a city’s or a county’s proposed action to adopt or substantially amend a general plan. This bill would also require a groundwater sustainability agency or an entity that submits an alternative to provide the planning agency with certain information as is appropriate and relevant, including a report on the anticipated effect of the proposed action on implementation of a groundwater sustainability plan. By imposing new duties on a city or county, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. (5)Senate Bill 1168 of the 2013–14 Regular Session, if enacted, would enact the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act, and would define “undesirable result” for purposes of those provisions. The act would grant specified authority to a groundwater sustainability agency relating to controlling groundwater extractions, and would specify that various provisions do not supersede the land use authority of cities and counties, as specified. This bill would revise the definition of “undesirable result,” and would specify that certain authority granted to a groundwater sustainability agency to control groundwater extractions shall be consistent with applicable elements of a city or county general plan, except as specified. The bill would provide that the provisions against superseding the land use authority of cities and counties apply to that authority within the overlying basin, including the city or county general plan, and would require a groundwater sustainability plan to take into account the most recent planning assumptions stated in local general plans overlying the basin. (6)The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that with regard to certain mandates no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. With regard to any other mandates, this bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs so mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above. (7)Existing constitutional provisions require that a statute that limits the right of access to the meetings of public bodies or the writings of public officials and agencies be adopted with findings demonstrating the interest protected by the limitation and the need for protecting that interest. This bill would make legislative findings to that effect. (8)This bill would make its operation contingent on the enactment of SB 1168 of the 2013–14 Regular Session. Hide
An Act to Add Section 106.3 to the Water Code, Relating to Water. AB 685 (2011-2012) EngSupportYes
Existing law establishes various state water policies, including the policy that the use of water for domestic purposes is the highest use of water. This bill would declare that it is the established… More
Existing law establishes various state water policies, including the policy that the use of water for domestic purposes is the highest use of water. This bill would declare that it is the established policy of the state that every human being has the right to safe, clean, affordable, and accessible water adequate for human consumption, cooking, and sanitary purposes. The bill would require all relevant state agencies, including the Department of Water Resources, the State Water Resources Control Board, and the State Department of Public Health, to consider this state policy when revising, adopting, or establishing policies, regulations, and grant criteria when those policies, regulations, and grant criteria are pertinent to the uses of water described above. Hide
An Act to Add Section 5653.2 To, and to Repeal and Add Section 5653.1 Of, the Fish and Game Code, Relating to Fish and Wildlife, and Declaring the Urgency Thereof, to Take Effect Immediately. SB 657 (2011-2012) GainesOpposeNo
The California Environmental Quality Act requires a lead agency, as defined, to prepare, or cause to be prepared by contract, and certify the completion of, an environmental impact report on a… More
The California Environmental Quality Act requires a lead agency, as defined, to prepare, or cause to be prepared by contract, and certify the completion of, an environmental impact report on a project, as defined, that it proposes to carry out or approve that may have a significant effect on the environment, or to adopt a negative declaration if it finds that the project will not have that effect. The act exempts from its provisions, among other things, certain types of ministerial projects proposed to be carried out or approved by public agencies, and emergency repairs to public service facilities necessary to maintain service. Existing law prohibits the use of any vacuum or suction dredge equipment by any person in any river, stream, or lake of this state without a permit issued by the Department of Fish and Game. Existing law designates the issuance of permits to operate vacuum or suction dredge equipment to be a project under the California Environmental Quality Act, and suspends the issuance of permits, and mining pursuant to a permit, until the department has completed an environmental impact report for the project as ordered by the court in a specified court action. Existing law prohibits the use of any vacuum or suction dredge equipment in any river, stream, or lake, for instream mining purposes, until the director of the department certifies to the Secretary of State that (1) the department has completed the environmental review of its existing vacuum or suction dredge equipment regulations as ordered by the court, (2) the department has transmitted for filing with the Secretary of State a certified copy of new regulations, as necessary, and (3) the new regulations are operative. This bill would repeal the prohibition on the use of vacuum or suction dredge equipment, and would exempt the issuance of permits to operate vacuum or suction dredge equipment from the California Environmental Quality Act until January 1, 2014. The bill would require the department to refund a specified portion of the permit fee paid by a person issued a vacuum or suction dredge equipment permit and subject to the prohibition on the use of vacuum or suction dredge equipment. The bill would require the department, on or before January 1, 2014, to complete an economic impact report on the prohibition on the use of vacuum and suction dredge equipment. This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as an urgency statute. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 5097.94 Of, and to Add Sections 21073, 21074, 21080.3.1, 21080.3.2, 21082.3, 21083.09, 21084.2, and 21084.3 To, the Public Resources Code, Relating to Native Americans. AB 52 (2013-2014) GattoSupportNo
Existing law, the Native American Historic Resource Protection Act, establishes a misdemeanor for unlawfully and maliciously excavating upon, removing, destroying, injuring, or defacing a Native… More
Existing law, the Native American Historic Resource Protection Act, establishes a misdemeanor for unlawfully and maliciously excavating upon, removing, destroying, injuring, or defacing a Native American historic, cultural, or sacred site, that is listed or may be eligible for listing in the California Register of Historic Resources. The California Environmental Quality Act, referred to as CEQA, requires a lead agency, as defined, to prepare, or cause to be prepared, and certify the completion of, an environmental impact report on a project that it proposes to carry out or approve that may have a significant effect on the environment or to adopt a negative declaration if it finds that the project will not have that effect. CEQA also requires a lead agency to prepare a mitigated negative declaration for a project that may have a significant effect on the environment if revisions in the project would avoid or mitigate that effect and there is no substantial evidence that the project, as revised, would have a significant effect on the environment. CEQA requires the lead agency to provide a responsible agency with specified notice and opportunities to comment on a proposed project. CEQA requires the Office of Planning and Research to prepare and develop, and the Secretary of the Natural Resources Agency to certify and adopt, guidelines for the implementation of CEQA that include, among other things, criteria for public agencies to following in determining whether or not a proposed project may have a significant effect on the environment. This bill would specify that a project with an effect that may cause a substantial adverse change in the significance of a tribal cultural resource, as defined, is a project that may have a significant effect on the environment. The bill would require a lead agency to begin consultation with a California Native American tribe that is traditionally and culturally affiliated with the geographic area of the proposed project, if the tribe requested to the lead agency, in writing, to be informed by the lead agency of proposed projects in that geographic area and the tribe requests consultation, prior to determining whether a negative declaration, mitigated negative declaration, or environmental impact report is required for a project. The bill would specify examples of mitigation measures that may be considered to avoid or minimize impacts on tribal cultural resources. The bill would make the above provisions applicable to projects that have a notice of preparation or a notice of negative declaration filed or mitigated negative declaration on or after July 1, 2015. The bill would require the Office of Planning and Research to revise on or before July 1, 2016, the guidelines to separate the consideration of tribal cultural resources from that for paleontological resources and add consideration of tribal cultural resources. By requiring the lead agency to consider these effects relative to tribal cultural resources and to conduct consultation with California Native American tribes, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. Existing law establishes the Native American Heritage Commission and vests the commission with specified powers and duties. This bill would additionally require the commission to provide each California Native American tribe, as defined, on or before July 1, 2016, with a list of all public agencies that may be a lead agency within the geographic area in which the tribe is traditionally and culturally affiliated, the contact information of those agencies, and information on how the tribe may request those public agencies to notify the tribe of projects within the jurisdiction of those public agencies for the purposes of requesting consultation. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
An Act to Add Section 12012.56 to the Government Code, Relating to Tribal Gaming, and Declaring the Urgency Thereof, to Take Effect Immediately. AB 517 (2011-2012) HallSplitYes
Existing federal law, the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988, provides for the negotiation and execution of tribal-state gaming compacts for the purpose of authorizing certain types of gaming on… More
Existing federal law, the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988, provides for the negotiation and execution of tribal-state gaming compacts for the purpose of authorizing certain types of gaming on Indian lands within a state. The California Constitution authorizes the Governor to negotiate and conclude compacts, subject to ratification by the Legislature. Existing law expressly ratifies a number of tribal-state gaming compacts, and amendments of tribal-state gaming compacts, between the State of California and specified Indian tribes. The California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) requires a lead agency to prepare, or cause to be prepared, and certify the completion of, an environmental impact report on a project, as defined, that it proposes to carry out or approve that may have a significant effect on the environment, as defined, or to adopt a negative declaration if it finds that the project will not have that effect. This bill would ratify the tribal-state gaming compact entered into between the State of California and the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, executed on March 27, 2012. The bill would provide that, in deference to tribal sovereignty, certain actions may not be deemed projects for purposes of CEQA. By imposing additional duties on a lead agency with regard to the implementation of CEQA requirements, this bill would increase the service provided by a local agency, thereby creating a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as an urgency statute. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 3960 Of, to Add Sections 3032, 3960.2, 3960.4, and 3960.6 To, and to Repeal Section 4756 Of, the Fish and Game Code, Relating to Mammals. SB 1221 (2011-2012) LieuSupportYes
Existing law makes it unlawful to permit or allow a dog to pursue any big game mammal, as defined, during the closed season, or any fully protected, rare, or endangered mammal at any time. Existing… More
Existing law makes it unlawful to permit or allow a dog to pursue any big game mammal, as defined, during the closed season, or any fully protected, rare, or endangered mammal at any time. Existing law authorizes employees of the Department of Fish and Game to capture any dog not under the reasonable control of its owner or handler, that is in violation of that provision, or that is inflicting, or immediately threatening to inflict, injury in violation of this provision. Existing law generally prohibits a person from using dogs to hunt, pursue, or molest bears,, but allows the use of one dog per hunter for the hunting of bears during open deer season, and the use of more than one dog per hunter during the open bear season except during the period when archery deer seasons or regular deer seasons are open. Under existing law, except as excluded, violations of the Fish and Game Code are misdemeanors. This bill, except as specified, would generally make it unlawful to permit or allow a dog to pursue a bear, as defined, or bobcat at any time. The bill would exempt from that prohibition the use of dogs by federal, state, or local law enforcement officers, or their agents or employees, when carrying out official duties as required by law. The bill would eliminate existing provisions allowing for the use of dogs to hunt bears, and would, instead, authorize the use of not more than 3 dogs to pursue bears or bobcats pursuant to a depredation permit issued by the department. The bill would authorize the department to authorize specified entities to use dogs to pursue bears or bobcats for the purpose of scientific research, under certain conditions. The bill would also authorize the pursuit of bears or bobcats by dogs that are guarding or protecting livestock or crops on property owned, leased, or rented by the owner of the dogs, if the dogs are maintained with, and remain in reasonable proximity to, the livestock or crops being guarded or protected. The bill would authorize the Fish and Game Commission to establish a hound tag program, imposing prescribed requirements on the licensure and use of hounds, as defined, to pursue mammals. By changing the definition of a crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
AB 742 (2011-2012) LowenthalSupportNo
An Act to Amend Sections 10927, 10933, and 12924 Of, to Add Sections 113 and 10750.1 To, and to Add Part 2.74 (Commencing with Section 10720) to Division 6 Of, the Water Code, Relating to Groundwater. SB 1168 (2013-2014) PavleySupportYes
(1)The California Constitution requires the reasonable and beneficial use of water. Existing law establishes various state water policies, including the policy that the people of the state have a… More
(1)The California Constitution requires the reasonable and beneficial use of water. Existing law establishes various state water policies, including the policy that the people of the state have a paramount interest in the use of all the water of the state and that the state is required to determine what water of the state, surface and underground, can be converted to public use or be controlled for public protection. This bill would state the policy of the state that groundwater resources be managed sustainably for long-term reliability and multiple economic, social, and environmental benefits for current and future beneficial uses. This bill would state that sustainable groundwater management is best achieved locally through the development, implementation, and updating of plans and programs based on the best available science. (2)Existing law requires the Department of Water Resources, in conjunction with other public agencies, to conduct an investigation of the state’s groundwater basins and to report its findings to the Legislature not later than January 1, 2012, and thereafter in years ending in 5 and 0. Existing law requires the department to identify the extent of monitoring of groundwater elevations that is being undertaken within each basin or subbasin and to prioritize groundwater basins and subbasins based on specified considerations, including any information determined to be relevant by the department. This bill would specify that this relevant information may include adverse impacts on local habitat and local streamflows. This bill would require the department to categorize each basin as high-, medium-, low-, or very low priority and would require the initial priority for each basin to be established no later than January 31, 2015. This bill would authorize a local agency to request that the department revise the boundaries of a basin and would require the department, by January 1, 2016, to adopt regulations on the methodology and criteria to be used to evaluate the proposed revision. This bill would require the department to provide a copy of its draft revision of a basin’s boundaries to the California Water Commission and would require the commission to hear and comment on the draft revision. (3)Existing law authorizes local agencies to adopt and implement a groundwater management plan. Existing law requires a groundwater management plan to contain specified components and requires a local agency seeking state funds administered by the Department of Water Resources for groundwater projects or groundwater quality projects to do certain things, including, but not limited to, preparing and implementing a groundwater management plan that includes basin management objectives for the groundwater basin. This bill, with certain exceptions, would prohibit, beginning January 1, 2015, a new groundwater management plan from being adopted or an existing groundwater management plan from being renewed. This bill would require all groundwater basins designated as high- or medium-priority basins by the Department of Water Resources that are designated as basins subject to critical conditions of overdraft to be managed under a groundwater sustainability plan or coordinated groundwater sustainability plans by January 31, 2020, and would require all other groundwater basins designated as high- or medium-priority basins to be managed under a groundwater sustainability plan or coordinated groundwater sustainability plans by January 31, 2022, except as specified. This bill would require a groundwater sustainability plan to be developed and implemented to meet the sustainability goal, established as prescribed, and would require the plan to include prescribed components. This bill would encourage and authorize basins designated as low- or very low priority basins to be managed under groundwater sustainability plans. This bill would authorize any local agency, as defined, or combination of local agencies to elect to be a groundwater sustainability agency and would require, within 30 days of electing to be or forming a groundwater sustainability agency, the groundwater sustainability agency to inform the department of its election or formation and its intent to undertake sustainable groundwater management. This bill would provide that a county within which an area unmanaged by a groundwater sustainability agency lies is presumed to be the groundwater sustainability agency for that area and would require the county to provide a prescribed notification to the department. This bill would provide specific authority to a groundwater sustainability agency, including, but not limited to, the ability to require registration of a groundwater extraction facility, to require that a groundwater extraction facility be measured with a water-measuring device, and to regulate groundwater extraction. This bill would authorize a groundwater sustainability agency to conduct inspections and would authorize a groundwater sustainability agency to obtain an inspection warrant. Because the willful refusal of an inspection lawfully authorized by an inspection warrant is a misdemeanor, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program by expanding the application of a crime. (4)The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. (5)This bill would make its operation contingent on the enactment of both AB 1739 and SB 1319 of the 2013–14 Regular Session. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 13477.6 of the Water Code, Relating to Water Quality. AB 30 (2013-2014) PereaSupportYes
Existing law, the Porter-Cologne Water Quality Control Act or the state act, establishes the State Water Pollution Control Revolving Fund program pursuant to which state and federal funds are… More
Existing law, the Porter-Cologne Water Quality Control Act or the state act, establishes the State Water Pollution Control Revolving Fund program pursuant to which state and federal funds are continuously appropriated from the State Water Pollution Control Revolving Fund to the State Water Resources Control Board for loans and other financial assistance for the construction of publicly owned treatment works by a municipality, the implementation of a management program, the development and implementation of a conservation and management plan, and other related purposes in accordance with the Federal Water Pollution Control Act and the state act. Existing law authorizes the board, until 2014, to assess a specified annual charge in connection with any financial assistance made pursuant to the revolving fund program in lieu of interest that otherwise would be charged and requires the proceeds generated from the imposition of that charge to be deposited in the State Water Pollution Control Revolving Fund Small Community Grant Fund or grant fund, along with any interest earned upon the moneys in the grant fund. Existing law provides that the charge remain unchanged until 2014, at which time it will terminate and be replaced by an identical interest rate, and prohibits the deposit of more than $50,000,000 into the grant fund. Existing law authorizes the board to expend the moneys in the grant fund, upon appropriation by the Legislature, for grants for eligible projects under the revolving fund program that serve small communities, as defined. This bill would eliminate the requirement that the charge remain unchanged until 2014 and instead would authorize the board to assess the charge without change unless the board makes a prescribed determination. This bill would require the board to replace the charge with an identical interest rate if the board ceases collecting the charge before the repayment is complete. This bill would eliminate the prohibition on the deposit of more than $50,000,000 collected by the charge into the grant fund. This bill would require the board to expend moneys appropriated from the grant fund within a period of 4 years from the date of encumbrance. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 3004.5 of the Fish and Game Code, Relating to Hunting. AB 711 (2013-2014) RendonOpposeYes
(1)Existing law requires the Fish and Game Commission, by July 1, 2008, to establish by regulation a public process to certify centerfire rifle and pistol ammunition as nonlead ammunition, and to… More
(1)Existing law requires the Fish and Game Commission, by July 1, 2008, to establish by regulation a public process to certify centerfire rifle and pistol ammunition as nonlead ammunition, and to define by regulation nonlead ammunition as including only centerfire rifle and pistol ammunition in which there is no lead content. Existing law requires the commission to establish and annually update a list of certified centerfire rifle and pistol ammunition. Existing law requires that nonlead centerfire rifle and pistol ammunition, as determined by the commission, be used when taking big game with a rifle or pistol, as defined by the Department of Fish and Wildlife’s hunting regulations, and when taking coyote, within specified deer hunting zones, but excluding specific counties and areas. A violation of these provisions is a crime. Existing law requires the commission to establish a process, to the extent that funding is available, that will provide hunters in these specified deer hunting zones with nonlead ammunition at no or reduced charge. This bill would instead require, as soon as is practicable, but by no later than July 1, 2019, the use of nonlead ammunition for the taking of all wildlife, including game mammals, game birds, nongame birds, and nongame mammals, with any firearm. The bill would require the commission to certify, by regulation, nonlead ammunition for these purposes. The bill would require that the list of certified ammunition include any federally approved nontoxic shotgun ammunition. The bill would make conforming changes. The bill would provide that these provisions do not apply to government officials or their agents when carrying out a statutory duty required by law. The bill would require the commission to promulgate regulations by July 1, 2015, that phase in the requirements of these provisions. The bill would require that these requirements be fully implemented statewide by no later than July 1, 2019. The bill would require the commission to implement any of these requirements that can be implemented practicably, in whole or in part, in advance of July 1, 2019. The bill would also require that the commission not reduce or eliminate any existing regulatory restrictions on the use of lead ammunition in California condor range, as described, unless or until the additional requirements for use of nonlead ammunition as required by these provisions are implemented. By expanding and changing the definition of a crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. (2)Existing federal law restricts the importing, manufacturing, or sale of armor-piercing ammunition, as specified. This bill would temporarily suspend the required use of nonlead ammunition for a specific hunting season and caliber upon a finding by the Director of Fish and Wildlife that nonlead ammunition of a specific caliber is not commercially available from any manufacturer because of federal prohibitions relating to armor-piercing ammunition. The bill would require, notwithstanding a suspension, that nonlead ammunition be used when taking big game mammals, nongame birds, or nongame mammals in the California condor range. (3)The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
An Act to Add and Repeal Section 123222.3 of the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Mammograms. SB 1538 (2011-2012) SimitianSupportYes
Existing law requires specified information to be provided to patients regarding their health care. Existing federal law requires a written report of the results of each mammography examination and… More
Existing law requires specified information to be provided to patients regarding their health care. Existing federal law requires a written report of the results of each mammography examination and requires a summary of that report to be sent to the patient within a specified time period. This bill, from April 1, 2013, until January 1, 2019, would require, under specified circumstances, a health facility at which a mammography examination is performed to include in the summary of the written report that is sent to the patient a prescribed notice on breast density. Hide
An Act to Add Section 44000.6 to the Public Resources Code, Relating to Solid Waste. SB 833 (2011-2012) VargasSupportNo
(1)The California Integrated Waste Management Act of 1989 regulates the management of solid waste. Existing law prohibits the operation of a solid waste facility without a solid waste facilities… More
(1)The California Integrated Waste Management Act of 1989 regulates the management of solid waste. Existing law prohibits the operation of a solid waste facility without a solid waste facilities permit and prohibits a person from disposing of solid waste, causing solid waste to be disposed of, arranging for the disposal of solid waste, transporting solid waste, or accepting solid waste for disposal, except at a permitted solid waste disposal facility. A violation of the provisions prohibiting the disposal of solid waste is a crime. This bill would prohibit a person from constructing or operating a solid waste landfill disposal facility located in the County of San Diego if that disposal facility is located within 1,000 feet of the San Luis Rey River or an aquifer that is hydrologically connected to that river and is within 1,000 feet of a site that is considered sacred or of spiritual or cultural importance to a tribe and is listed in the California Native American Heritage Commission Sacred Lands Inventory. The bill would require the enforcement agency to enforce a violation of this prohibition by the immediate issuance of a cease and desist order, thereby imposing a state-mandated local program by imposing a new duty upon local agencies. The bill would make a declaration of legislative findings regarding why a general statute cannot be made applicable within the meaning of Section 16 of Article IV of the California Constitution. Because a violation of this bill’s requirements would be a crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. (2)The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for specified reasons. Hide
SB 1390 (2011-2012) WrightOpposeNo
An Act to Add Chapter 5.2 (Commencing with Section 19990.01) to Division 8 of the Business and Professions Code, Relating to Internet Gambling, and Declaring the Urgency Thereof, to Take Effect Immediately. SB 1485 (2009-2010) WrightOpposeNo
The Gambling Control Act provides for the licensure of certain individuals and establishments that conduct controlled games, as defined, and for the regulation of these gambling activities by the… More
The Gambling Control Act provides for the licensure of certain individuals and establishments that conduct controlled games, as defined, and for the regulation of these gambling activities by the California Gambling Control Commission. Existing law provides for the enforcement of those regulations by the Department of Justice. Any violation of these provisions is punishable as a misdemeanor, as specified. This bill would establish a framework to authorize intrastate Internet gambling, as specified. The bill would require the department to issue a request for proposals to enter into contracts with up to 3 hub operators, as defined, to provide lawful Internet gambling games to registered players in California for a period of 20 years, as specified. The bill would provide that it would make it a misdemeanor for any person to offer or play any gambling game provided over the Internet that is not authorized by the state pursuant to this bill. By creating a new crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The bill would require a hub operator to remit an agreed-upon percentage but no less than 10%, of its gross revenues to the Treasurer on a monthly basis. The bill would also create the Internet Gambling Fund which would be administered by the Controller subject to annual appropriation by the Legislature, and which would not be subject to the formulas established by statute directing expenditures from the General Fund, for appropriation by the Legislature to state agencies, as specified. Existing law provides that a statute that imposes a requirement that a state agency submit a periodic report to the Legislature is inoperative on a date 4 years after the date the first report is due. This bill would require the commission, notwithstanding that requirement, in consultation with the department, Treasurer, and Franchise Tax Board, to issue a report to the Legislature describing the state’s efforts to meet the policy goals articulated in this bill within one year of the effective date of this bill and, annually, thereafter. The bill would also require the Bureau of State Audits, 3 years after the commencement date of any hub operations contract with the state, but no later than 4 years after that date, to issue a report to the Legislature detailing the bureau’s implementation of this bill, as specified. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as an urgency statute. Hide